Work From the Beach? Hawaii is Handing Out Free Trips to New Yorkers

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iStock

If the big-city grind is burning you out, perhaps what you need is a change of scenery. Here to help is Hawaii’s tourism department, which is offering a one-week, all-inclusive residency to six hardworking professionals from New York City, as Travel+Leisure spotted.

The new program, called Work From Hawaii, is run by Hawaii Tourism United States (HTUSA), the marketing contractor for the Hawaii Tourism Authority. The package—valued at $10,000—includes round-trip airfare from New York City, an eight-day stay in one of six locations in Hawaii, access to a workspace, and additional activities related to food, culture, and adventure.

Slated for September 2018, each of the residencies is tailored to a different profession. App developers can get inspired at a high-tech lab overlooking Maui, while musicians can record from a sound studio on the Big Island of Hawaii, and writers can take respite in quiet Molokai. There are also opportunities for designers, photographers, and entrepreneurs located on Oahu, Kauai, and Lanai.

In addition to living and working in one of New York City’s five boroughs, qualified applicants must be between the ages of 24 and 36. They also need to have a public Instagram account, as they will be asked to share their experiences on social media. According to the official rules, the six winners will be chosen by a panel of judges based on categories like their social media presence, enthusiasm about the prize, and "suitability for promotional use." The application form asks about your work background, what projects you would work on if chosen, and “why working from Hawaii would help you come back better at your craft.”

A poll by HTUSA of 1000 Americans revealed that 60 percent of millennials have worked while on vacation, and 83 percent say they feel more productive when they work outside of a traditional office setting. The Work From Hawaii program “celebrates the career-minded traveler —especially New Yorkers, who do everything in service of their hustle,” Jay Talwar, Senior Vice President of Hawaii Tourism United States, said in a statement.

While the pilot program is limited to residents of New York City, the tourism agency hopes it could someday be adopted in other cities. Until then, all of the suggested itineraries can be booked by the general public starting in October.

Ready to say aloha to a new office near the beach? You can apply online here. Applications close June 4.

[h/t Travel+Leisure]

10 Travel Hacks That Will Save You Time and Money

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iStock.com/a_namenko

Traveling can be one of life's greatest experiences, but if things go wrong, you might wish you had stayed at home. In an effort to help you spend less and stress less on your next vacation, the London Luton Airport has created an infographic containing helpful travel advice.

Some of the tips are gentle reminders—like book your flights early, avoid peak traveling seasons, and please be nice to the airline staff—while others are less obvious. For instance, it's best to avoid flying over a seven-night block of time. If you book flights over a period of six or eight nights instead, "you've got a better chance of scoring a lower fare," the airport claims. (Also worth noting: If you're flying domestic in the U.S., the cheapest days to travel are usually Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Saturdays, according to Fare Compare. For international flights, weekdays are typically cheaper, although it depends on the exact route.)

In general, anything you can take care of in advance is a good idea. Check to see if you can get a better parking rate by pre-paying online, and take the time to apply for a TSA PreCheck. It's easy to do, and when it's all said and done, you'll be able to join the express line at airport security. If only Starbucks had a fast lane, too.

Keep scrolling to read more advice from the London Luton Airport, and for more travel tips, check out Mental Floss's guides to booking flights, packing a suitcase, and crafting the perfect itinerary.

10 TRAVEL HACKS TO SAVE YOU TIME AND MONEY

Climate Change Is Threatening Nearly All UNESCO Sites Around the Mediterranean

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iStock.com/tunart

The Mediterranean is home to some of the world's most famous cultural wonders, with 49 UNESCO-recognized world heritage sites in the region in total. Now, the organization warns that all but two of these sites are threatened by flooding and erosion linked to climate change, Artnet News reports.

For a recent study, published in the journal Nature Communications, a team of researchers looked at how various possible outcomes of rising sea levels could impact the Mediterranean coast between now and 2100. They found that even if global temperatures rise just 2°C (about 3.6°F) above pre-industrial numbers, the area's most treasured sites will still be at risk.

The places most vulnerable to rising sea levels include the Patriarchal Basilica of Aquileia, the Renaissance city of Ferrara, and the city of Venice. When it comes to erosion, Tyre in Lebanon, the archaeological sites of Tárraco in Spain, and the Ephesus in Turkey face the most pressing danger.

A handful of world heritage sites along the Mediterranean Sea, like the Early Christian Monuments of Ravenna and the Cathedral of St. James, could potentially be relocated as an extreme final option. Only two sites on the list—Medina of Tunis and Xanthos-Letoon—would be safe from the flooding and erosion spurred by climate change.

Rising global temperatures are on track to reshape coasts, not just in the Mediterranean, but around the world. In addition to historic sites, homes and airports are also under threat.

[h/t Artnet News]

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