Disney on Ice: The Truth About Walt Disney and Cryogenics

Keystone/Getty Images
Keystone/Getty Images

Walt Disney passed away on December 15, 1966, at the age of 65. Though he kept his habit away from the eyes of the children at his parks, Disney was a lifelong, three-pack-a-day smoker. The habit caught up with him on November 2, 1966, when an X-ray revealed a tumor on his left lung. On November 11, surgeons removed Walt’s left lung and gave him the bad news that the tumor had metastasized. Though they gave him six months to two years to live, Walt lasted just 34 days, succumbing to lung cancer on December 15.

Contrary to popular belief, Disney was cremated two days later—not frozen. After decades of speculation, his family finally decided they were tired of the rumor mill. In 2012, Disney’s daughter, Diane Disney Miller, told the Daily Mail that part of the reason the Disneys opened the Walt Disney Family Museum in San Francisco was to combat some of the ridiculous rumors about her father’s life, including the Walt-cicle tall tale. “Other little kids would say to my kids, ‘Your grandfather is frozen, isn’t he?’ And I couldn’t let that stand,” Disney Miller said.

That little myth probably got started in 1972, when Bob Nelson, then the president of the Cryonics Society of California, gave an interview to the Los Angeles Times. Though what he specifically said was that Walt was not cryogenically frozen, even going so far as to say, “They had him cremated. I personally have seen his ashes,” what people likely remembered from the article was his statement that Walt wanted to be frozen.

He based this theory on the fact that Walt Disney Studios called Nelson prior to Disney’s death and asked elaborate questions about the process, the facilities, the staff, and their history. “The truth is, Walt missed out,” Nelson said. “He never specified it in writing, and when he died the family didn’t go for it. ... Two weeks later we froze the first man. If Disney had been the first it would have made headlines around the world and been a real shot in the arm for cryonics.”

So, mystery solved. Walt is not on ice; he's at Forest Lawn Cemetery in Glendale, California, buried with his wife, daughter, and son-in-law.

Facebook Is Now Fact-Checking Your Memes

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iStock

Keanu Reeves once gave a stranger an envelope full of cash to pay for his son’s kidney transplant. A shark was seen swimming down the freeway during Hurricane Florence in New Bern, North Carolina. NASA has confirmed that the Earth will go dark for 15 days due to a solar storm. If these stories seem too absurd to be true, it’s because they’re not true.

That hasn’t stopped them from being spread across social media, though. Misinformation on the internet is rampant, and it’s often shared in bite-sized meme format. Now, as CNBC reports, Facebook is taking measures to stop it.

The social media behemoth has announced plans to fact-check information found within memes, pictures, and videos—formats that have generally been harder to monitor. Facebook currently employs third-party fact checkers, but most of those efforts have focused on articles.

“People share millions of photos and videos on Facebook every day,” Facebook said in a statement. “We know that this kind of sharing is particularly compelling because it’s visual. That said, it also creates an easy opportunity for manipulation by bad actors.”

These efforts are partly motivated by the upcoming mid-term elections and the desire to cut down on false political posts and foreign interference. In the U.S., Facebook uses the Associated Press, Factcheck.org, PolitiFact, Snopes.com, and The Weekly Standard Fact Check to verify information. Posts can be flagged and removed for three reasons: manipulation or fabrication, photos or information taken out of context, or false audio, text, or captions. 

[h/t CNBC]

It's True: Men's Pockets Really Are Deeper Than Women's

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iStock

Your phone peeks halfway out of the pocket of your jeans.

Your pocket-sized wallet is too large to fit.

You go to tuck a dollar into the pocket of your new dress pants, only to find that the opening is sewn shut.

If these scenarios sound familiar, you’re probably a woman. As Lifehacker reports, an investigation into 20 popular clothing brands revealed that the pockets on women’s pants really are shallower and narrower than men’s. About half as deep, in fact.

These findings come from The Pudding’s team of journalist-engineers, who produced a visual essay (with interactive infographics!) on the sartorial subject.

The announcement probably won’t surprise women, but for the sake of closing the pocket gap once and for all, the statistics are still worth noting: Women’s jeans pockets are 48 percent shorter and 6.5 percent narrower than men’s.

Furthermore, only 40 percent of front pockets can fit a smartphone—the iPhone X, Samsung Galaxy, and Google Pixel were all put to the test. The same statistic applies to wallets that were specifically designed to fit inside a front pocket. And two percent of women’s pockets can’t even hold a pen (compared to zero percent of men’s pockets).

Remember that time Alanis Morissette sang, “I’ve got one hand in my pocket?” As it turns out, only 10 percent of women can relate to this lyric—the same percentage of women who can actually fit their hand inside their front pocket.

As The Pudding points out, this isn’t just a matter of differences between men’s and women’s sizes, either. “Here we measured 80 pairs of jeans that all boasted a 32 inch waistband, meaning that these jeans were all made to fit the same size person,” The Pudding says.

So what’s going on? Some sources have suggested that the fashion industry is inherently sexist, favoring design over function. "I don't feel like they're taking women seriously as a market," Julie Sygiel, founder of The Pockets Project, told The Week. Sygiel plans to create a line of dresses with pockets that are least 8.5 inches deep.

While this pocketless trend is rooted in history—women started wearing hip purses in the 18th century to compensate for the lack of internal pockets—many women are hoping that the 21st century will be the dawn of a new era for functional fashion.

[h/t Lifehacker]

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