CLOSE
Original image
Getty Images

10 Great Discoveries of “Lost” Movies and TV Shows

Original image
Getty Images

A recent study by the Library of Congress revealed that 70 percent of the 11,000 silent films produced in America have been lost forever due to time and neglect. But we shouldn't completely give up hope that some of the films won't be recovered. A number of films and even television shows once thought lost have been rediscovered, quite unexpectedly, in many unusual ways. Here are some of the more surprising finds.

1. Found on eBay: Charlie Chaplin in Zepped

In 2009, an English inventor bought a can of film for $5 on eBay, containing a 1916 Charlie Chaplin film. Not only was the film “lost,” but nobody was even aware of its existence. Though filmed in Hollywood, Charlie Chaplin in Zepped supported Britain’s World War I effort. It would be auctioned in 2011 for £100,000 ($164,070)—just before another copy of the same film was discovered at a charity shop, in a box with many other odds and ends. 

2. Found in milk churns: The Mitchell & Kenyon Collection

Filmmakers Sagar Mitchell and James Kenyon roamed the British Isles between 1900 and 1913, filming people in their everyday lives, news footage, and slapstick comedy that might have influenced Chaplin. Their films were missing until 1994, when two workmen, at the site of an old toyshop, found three large milk churns containing hundreds of small spools of film. How the films found their way into milk churns was unknown, and it was lucky that the highly flammable nitrate film had survived so long, in such conditions, without exploding. The discovery, however, was a buzz for historians.

3. Found in the wrong place, with the wrong title: The Sentimental Bloke

Considered by many buffs to be Australia’s greatest silent movie, The Sentimental Bloke (1919) was based on a popular poem. For decades, it was assumed that no high-quality copy existed—until an Australian archivist found it, by chance, in a U.S. archive. If it had been archived, why didn’t anyone know about it? Well, it had been relabeled “The Sentimental Blonde.” The slang word “bloke” (man) is common in Britain and Australia, but not in the U.S., so the librarian assumed that it was a misprint and helpfully “corrected” it. 

4. Left for safekeeping: Outside the Law

In the 1920s, a man who worked for Universal Pictures, delivering films around the country, left some films for safekeeping with friends in Crystal, Minnesota. He never returned for the films, and the family forgot about them for over a generation, leaving them in the barn. The films might still be there today, if a later resident had not heard film historian Bob DeFlores interviewed on radio, talking about lost films. After she called in, DeFlores discovered that the one of the films was Outside the Law (1920), a lost crime film starring Lon Chaney and directed by Tod Browning. 

5. Found in a dead man’s collection: The White Shadow

Many lost films and TV shows are jealously guarded by private collectors—and sometimes, these collectors don’t know the treasure they’re sitting on. The private collection of a New Zealand cinema projectionist was left in an archive after his death in 1989. It was not until 2011 that an American archivist was sent to investigate—and she found that the collection was far more exciting that its owner had thought. A reel labeled “Twin Sisters” was actually half of The White Shadow, a lost 1924 film whose assistant director (and writer, set designer, and editor) was a multitalented 24-year-old named Alfred Hitchcock, who would make his directing debut the next year. “Unidentified American Film,” meanwhile, was found to be part of Upstream (1927), an important John Ford comedy.

6. Found in an asylum: Tarzan and the Golden Lion

Many “lost” films have been discovered in attics, sheds, barns, flea markets, even one in a film can that was being used as a football by a bunch of schoolboys! However, few places were more unusual than a French asylum in the 1990s, where many silent films were stacked in a closet. This included the lost film Tarzan and the Golden Lion (1927), starring former All-American footballer Big Jim Pierce as Tarzan.

7. Rescued on the way to the junkyard: The Flying Doctor

In Australia, a project called the “Last Film Search” was started in the 1960s, tracking down early films before they were destroyed in the hot Australian summers. As Aussies heard about this project, some of them made daring rescues. In one case, workmen clearing a building site in Sydney opened a structure that (unknown to them) was an old vault of a demolished film studio. The vault was full of films (naturally), which were loaded into a truck to be (uh oh) taken to a local junkyard. On the way, however, they were noticed by an office worker, who chased them in his car. Like a dashing movie hero, he stopped them in the nick of time. The films were saved—most notably a lost 1936 film called The Flying Doctor. 

8. Finally uncovered by the star: The Honeymooners

For decades, fans of the classic sitcom The Honeymooners could watch only 39 episodes, shot on 35mm film during the 1955-56 season. These were shown in endless reruns. However, dozens of episodes (recorded live on kinescope film between 1951 and 1957) had been hoarded by the star of the series, Jackie Gleason. Eventually, Gleason released the “Lost Honeymooners” to the public, and this newly discovered treasure trove began airing on Showtime in 1985. The reason that Gleason finally revealed these episodes? “I’m sick of watching those other Honeymooners.” 

9. Found in the star’s garage: Richard Burton’s Hamlet

This filmed record of a very popular Broadway production in 1964, starring Burton and directed by Peter O’Toole, was thought not so much “lost” as destroyed. By contractual agreement, all prints were to be destroyed after the film’s (somewhat less than successful) cinema run. As with the play itself, the idea was that you had to be there. However, a print was unexpectedly discovered in Burton’s garage following his death in 1984. 

10. Found in the censors’ vaults: the nastiest moments from Doctor Who!

Of the classic Doctor Who episodes, 97 are missing, thanks to film and videotape being erased or junked. That sounds terrible, until you consider that, back in 1983, a total of 134 episodes were missing. Since then, several episodes have been retrieved—partly by the BBC (which has been searching to fill in the gaps in their archives) and partly by the show’s fans. One of the more unusual retrievals was in 1996, when fans noticed that the Australian Archives had several scenes on 16mm film, excised from the show for Australian broadcast. The censors had deemed these scenes—most of which last only a few seconds—to be too violent, too scary or too disturbing for children. It is ironic that, since that discovery, the censored moments of some episodes, the ones too terrible to show, are the only ones that survive!

Original image
iStock
arrow
Live Smarter
8 Tricks to Help Your Cat and Dog to Get Along
Original image
iStock

When people aren’t debating whether cats or dogs are more intelligent, they’re equating them as mortal foes. That’s a stereotype that both cat expert Jackson Galaxy, host of the Animal Planet show My Cat From Hell, and certified dog trainer Zoe Sandor want to break.

Typically, cats are aloof and easily startled, while dogs are gregarious and territorial. This doesn't mean, however, that they can't share the same space—they're just going to need your help. “If cats and dogs are brought up together in a positive, loving, encouraging environment, they’re going to be friends,” Galaxy tells Mental Floss. “Or at the very least, they’ll tolerate each other.”

The duo has teamed up in a new Animal Planet series, Cat Vs. Dog, which airs on Saturdays at 10 p.m. The show chronicles their efforts to help pet owners establish long-lasting peace—if not perfect harmony—among cats and dogs. (Yes, it’s possible.) Gleaned from both TV and off-camera experiences, here are eight tips Galaxy and Sandor say will help improve household relations between Fido and Fluffy.

1. TAKE PERSONALITY—NOT BREED—INTO ACCOUNT.

Contrary to popular belief, certain breeds of cats and dogs don't typically get along better than others. According to Galaxy and Sandor, it’s more important to take their personalities and energy levels into account. If a dog is aggressive and territorial, it won’t be a good fit in a household with a skittish cat. In contrast, an aging dog would hate sharing his space with a rambunctious kitten.

If two animals don’t end up being a personality match, have a backup plan, or consider setting up a household arrangement that keeps them separated for the long term. And if you’re adopting a pet, do your homework and ask its previous owners or shelter if it’s lived with other animals before, or gets along with them.

2. TRAIN YOUR DOG.

To set your dog up for success with cats, teach it to control its impulses, Sandor says. Does it leap across the kitchen when someone drops a cookie, or go on high alert when it sees a squeaky toy? If so, it probably won’t be great with cats right off the bat, since it will likely jump up whenever it spots a feline.

Hold off Fido's face time with Fluffy until the former is trained to stay put. And even then, keep a leash handy during the first several cat-dog meetings.

3. GIVE A CAT ITS OWN TERRITORY BEFORE IT MEETS A DOG.

Cats need a protected space—a “base camp” of sorts—that’s just theirs, Galaxy says. Make this refuge off-limits to the dog, but create safe spaces around the house, too. This way, the cat can confidently navigate shared territory without trouble from its canine sibling.

Since cats are natural climbers, Galaxy recommends taking advantage of your home’s vertical space. Buy tall cat trees, install shelves, or place a cat bed atop a bookcase. This allows your cat to observe the dog from a safe distance, or cross a room without touching the floor.

And while you’re at it, keep dogs away from the litter box. Cats should feel safe while doing their business, plus dogs sometimes (ew) like to snack on cat feces, a bad habit that can cause your pooch to contract intestinal parasites. These worms can cause a slew of health problems, including vomiting, diarrhea, weight loss, and anemia.

Baby gates work in a pinch, but since some dogs are escape artists, prepare for worst-case scenarios by keeping the litter box uncovered and in an open space. That way, the cat won’t be cornered and trapped mid-squat.

4. EXERCISE YOUR DOG'S BODY AND MIND.

“People exercise their dogs probably 20 percent of what they should really be doing,” Sandor says. “It’s really important that their energy is released somewhere else so that they have the ability to slow down their brains and really control themselves when they’re around kitties.”

Dogs also need lots of stimulation. Receiving it in a controlled manner makes them less likely to satisfy it by, say, chasing a cat. For this, Sandor recommends toys, herding-type activities, lure coursing, and high-intensity trick training.

“Instead of just taking a walk, stop and do a sit five times on every block,” she says. “And do direction changes three times on every block, or speed changes two times. It’s about unleashing their herding instincts and prey drive in an appropriate way.”

If you don’t have time for any of these activities, Zoe recommends hiring a dog walker, or enrolling in doggy daycare.

5. LET CATS AND DOGS FOLLOW THEIR NOSES.

In Galaxy's new book, Total Cat Mojo, he says it’s a smart idea to let cats and dogs sniff each other’s bedding and toys before a face-to-face introduction. This way, they can satisfy their curiosity and avoid potential turf battles.

6. PLAN THE FIRST CAT/DOG MEETING CAREFULLY.

Just like humans, cats and dogs have just one good chance to make a great first impression. Luckily, they both love food, which might ultimately help them love each other.

Schedule the first cat-dog meeting during mealtime, but keep the dog on a leash and both animals on opposite sides of a closed door. They won’t see each other, but they will smell each other while chowing down on their respective foods. They’ll begin to associate this smell with food, thus “making it a good thing,” Galaxy says.

Do this every mealtime for several weeks, before slowly introducing visual simulation. Continue feeding the cat and dog separately, but on either side of a dog gate or screen, before finally removing it all together. By this point, “they’re eating side-by-side, pretty much ignoring each other,” Galaxy says. For safety’s sake, continue keeping the dog on a leash until you’re confident it’s safe to take it off (and even then, exercise caution).

7. KEEP THEIR FOOD AND TOYS SEPARATE.

After you've successfully ingratiated the cat and dog using feeding exercises, keep their food bowls separate. “A cat will walk up to the dog bowl—either while the dog’s eating, or in the vicinity—and try to eat out of it,” Galaxy says. “The dog just goes to town on them. You can’t assume that your dog isn’t food-protective or resource-protective.”

To prevent these disastrous mealtime encounters, schedule regular mealtimes for your pets (no free feeding!) and place the bowls in separate areas of the house, or the cat’s dish up on a table or another high spot.

Also, keep a close eye on the cat’s toys—competition over toys can also prompt fighting. “Dogs tend to get really into catnip,” Galaxy says. “My dog loves catnip a whole lot more than my cats do.”

8. CONSIDER RAISING A DOG AND CAT TOGETHER (IF YOU CAN).

Socializing these animals at a young age can be easier than introducing them as adults—pups are easily trainable “sponges” that soak up new information and situations, Sandor says. Plus, dogs are less confident and smaller at this stage in life, allowing the cat to “assume its rightful position at the top of the hierarchy,” she adds.

Remain watchful, though, to ensure everything goes smoothly—especially when the dog hits its rambunctious “teenage” stage before becoming a full-grown dog.

arrow
Animals
10 Juicy Facts About Sea Apples

They're both gorgeous and grotesque. Sea apples, a type of marine invertebrate, have dazzling purple, yellow, and blue color schemes streaking across their bodies. But some of their habits are rather R-rated. Here’s what you should know about these weird little creatures.

1. THEY’RE SEA CUCUMBERS.

The world’s oceans are home to more than 1200 species of sea cucumber. Like sand dollars and starfish, sea cucumbers are echinoderms: brainless, spineless marine animals with skin-covered shells and a complex network of internal hydraulics that enables them to get around. Sea cucumbers can thrive in a range of oceanic habitats, from Arctic depths to tropical reefs. They're a fascinating group with colorful popular names, like the “burnt hot dog sea cucumber” (Holothuria edulis) and the sea pig (Scotoplanes globosa), a scavenger that’s been described as a “living vacuum cleaner.”

2. THEY'RE NATIVE TO THE WESTERN PACIFIC OCEAN.

Sea apples have oval-shaped bodies and belong to the genus Pseudocolochirus and genus Paracacumaria. The animals are indigenous to the western Pacific, where they can be found shuffling across the ocean floor in shallow, coastal waters. Many different types are kept in captivity, but two species, Pseudocolochirus violaceus and Pseudocolochirus axiologus, have proven especially popular with aquarium hobbyists. Both species reside along the coastlines of Australia and Southeast Asia.

3. THEY EAT WITH MUCUS-COVERED TENTACLES.

Sea cucumbers, the ocean's sanitation crew, eat by swallowing plankton, algae, and sandy detritus at one end of their bodies and then expelling clean, fresh sand out their other end. Sea apples use a different technique. A ring of mucus-covered tentacles around a sea apple's mouth snares floating bits of food, popping each bit into its mouth one at a time. In the process, the tentacles are covered with a fresh coat of sticky mucus, and the whole cycle repeats.

4. THEY’RE ACTIVE AT NIGHT.

Sea apples' waving appendages can look delicious to predatory fish, so the echinoderms minimize the risk of attracting unwanted attention by doing most of their feeding at night. When those tentacles aren’t in use, they’re retracted into the body.

5. THE MOVE ON TUBULAR FEET.

The rows of yellow protuberances running along the sides of this specimen are its feet. They allow sea apples to latch onto rocks and other hard surfaces while feeding. And if one of these feet gets severed, it can grow back.

6. SOME FISH HANG OUT IN SEA APPLES' BUTTS.

Sea apples are poisonous, but a few marine freeloaders capitalize on this very quality. Some small fish have evolved to live inside the invertebrates' digestive tracts, mooching off the sea apples' meals and using their bodies for shelter. In a gross twist of evolution, fish gain entry through the back door, an orifice called the cloaca. In addition expelling waste, the cloaca absorbs fresh oxygen, meaning that sea apples/cucumbers essentially breathe through their anuses.

7. WHEN THREATENED, SEA APPLES CAN EXPAND.

Most full-grown adult sea apples are around 3 to 8 inches long, but they can make themselves look twice as big if they need to escape a threat. By pulling extra water into their bodies, some can grow to the size of a volleyball, according to Advanced Aquarist. After puffing up, they can float on the current and away from danger. Some aquarists might mistake the robust display as a sign of optimum health, but it's usually a reaction to stress.

8. THEY CAN EXPEL THEIR OWN GUTS.

Sea apples use their vibrant appearance to broadcast that they’re packing a dangerous toxin. But to really scare off predators, they puke up some of their own innards. When an attacker gets too close, sea apples can expel various organs through their orifices, and some simultaneously unleash a cloud of the poison holothurin. In an aquarium, the holothurin doesn’t disperse as widely as it would in the sea, and it's been known to wipe out entire fish tanks.

9. SEA APPLES LAY TOXIC EGGS.

These invertebrates reproduce sexually; females release eggs that are later fertilized by clouds of sperm emitted by the males. As many saltwater aquarium keepers know all too well, sea apple eggs are not suitable fish snacks—because they’re poisonous. Scientists have observed that, in Pseudocolochirus violaceus at least, the eggs develop into small, barrel-shaped larvae within two weeks of fertilization.

10. THEY'RE NOT EASILY CONFUSED WITH THIS TREE SPECIES.

Syzgium grande is a coastal tree native to Southeast Asia whose informal name is "sea apple." When fully grown, they can stand more than 140 feet tall. Once a year, it produces attractive clusters of fuzzy white flowers and round green fruits, perhaps prompting its comparison to an apple tree.

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios