World's First Underwater Residence to Open in the Maldives

PRNewsfoto/Conrad Maldives Rangali Island
PRNewsfoto/Conrad Maldives Rangali Island

If you’ve ever wanted to live out your childhood dream of sleeping under the sea, here’s your chance. The Maldives is already home to several underwater restaurants, an underwater spa, and underwater guest rooms, but now it's getting its first fully submerged villa.

Dubbed “The Muraka,” or coral in the Maldivian language of Dhivehi, this exclusive residence will be located at the Conrad Maldives Rangali Island resort, and is slated to open this November. The tropical nation, famed for its marine life and coral reefs, is a popular luxury honeymoon destination.

While other Maldivian resorts offer underwater bedrooms, those look out onto man-made aquariums, according to Architectural Digest. What sets the Conrad’s resort apart is that it sits on the ocean floor, 16.4 feet underwater. It’s located in the Alifu Dhaalu Atoll, one of 26 natural atolls in the Maldives, known for being one of the best places to view whale sharks. The Muraka, which can accommodate up to nine guests, has two levels—one above water, and one below—and includes a powder room, gym, kitchen, bar, living room, dining area, two bedrooms, two bathrooms, butler’s quarters, and private security quarters.

So how much will all that go for? When it opens, the starting rate is estimated to be $50,000 a night, according to Architectural Digest. The Conrad brand has an affinity for underwater spaces. It brought the first underwater restaurant, Ithaca, to the Maldives 13 years ago, and since then many other hotel chains have followed suit.

Dubai also started unveiling its “Floating Seahorse” underwater villas in 2016, but not all of those are available yet, Condé Nast Traveler reports.

See below for more photos of the Conrad Maldives Rangali Island.

[h/t Architectural Digest]

Attention Aspiring Astronauts: Arlo Skye Now Has Space-Themed Luggage

Arlo Skye
Arlo Skye

While some travelers are preoccupied with getting their luggage through airport security, the designers at Arlo Skye are thinking bigger. As Condé Nast Traveler reports, the brand's new line of suitcases is inspired by space travel, with high tech features and a sleek, futuristic look.

Arlo Skye was founded in 2016 by alumni from Louis Vuitton and Tumi Inc. They set out to create luggage that emphasized design, with luxury polycarbonate suitcases available in trendy colors like rose gold and custom monogramming.

The company's Space Collection may be its most stylized line yet. It comes with a removable, 10,050-milliamp-hour charger with USB C and A ports for charging phones and other devices. The chrome-colored case is 22 inches tall, 9 inches deep, and 14 inches wide and weighs 8.5 pounds empty.

Space Collection suitcase from Arlo Skye
Arlo Skye

Depending on what type of space traveler you are, you can get one of three designs laser-etched on the bottom of your luggage. There's Moon Shot, Team Human, and Occupy Mars; each engraving comes with a short ode to space and a small picture of its respective celestial body. Like other suitcases made by Arlo Skye, these bags are zipper-free and made from polycarbonate with an aluminum frame.

Whether you're a globetrotter or an aspiring astronaut, the Space Collection from Arlo Skye makes a great travel companion.

Buy it from Arlo Skye for $450.

[h/t Condé Nast Traveler]

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Here's How You Can Help Rebuild Paris's Notre-Dame Cathedral

 Kitwood, Getty Images
Kitwood, Getty Images

A fire at Paris’s famed Notre-Dame Cathedral raged for nine hours on Monday, drawing the world’s attention to the partial destruction of one of the best-known cultural monuments on the planet. The efforts of more than 400 firefighters managed to preserve much of the 859-year-old structure, but the roof and spire were destroyed.

Financial support for the building has already come pouring in, with billionaire François-Henri Pinault pledging $113 million toward reconstruction and another billionaire, Bernard Arnault, promising $226 million. A total of roughly $1 billion has come in from donations, but a revitalized Notre-Dame is a considerable expense that could cost even more.

For people who would like to assist, donations are being accepted by the nonprofit French Heritage Society for virtually any amount.

Why will expenses run so high? Prior to the fire, Notre-Dame was in dire need of extensive restoration. Buttresses caused instability to major walls, gargoyles were damaged, and cracks had formed in the now-destroyed spire. The cathedral is owned by the French government, which allots roughly 2 million euros (or about $2.26 million) annually to upkeep. Between the existing wear and the fire, it could take years or possibly decades for the work to be completed.

The publicity surrounding Notre-Dame has also motivated people to assist in rebuilding efforts on a smaller scale, and closer to home. Three churches in Louisiana that were recently targeted in allegedly racist arson attacks saw donations climb from $150,000 to over $1 million following the Notre-Dame fire. You can donate to that GoFundMe campaign here.

[h/t CNN]

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