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Home Town Cake
Home Town Cake

12 Cakes That Look Like Fast Food Specialties

Home Town Cake
Home Town Cake

These cakes look they should be served out of a drive-through window.

1 & 2. McDonald's

McDonald's is the largest fast food chain in the world, so it shouldn’t be surprising that there are more McDonald’s cakes out there than any other fast food company. The impressive Home Town Cake version of a Big Mac and fries above was made for a McDonald’s grand opening, but there are lots of homemade creations, too.

Take, for example, this sweet treat, which was created by Cake Central user amberhoney for her 8-year-old nephew’s birthday. The French fry box and cup are both real McDonald’s props, but the fries are made from marzipan and the soda cup is actually filled with cola-flavored Jell-O. The burger is made from chocolate fudge.

While this McDonald’s meal might not look quite as realistic as the other two above, it does have the unique distinction of containing a drinkable soda. While Cake Central user Corikiky didn’t say any specifics about the cake, it appears to be for a crew meeting, which means that McDonald’s location really wanted to get the team inspired.

3. Fatburger

Fatburger might not be as popular as McDonald’s, but if this cake—created by Colette’s Cakes—is any indication, the company certainly has its legions of fans.

4. Whataburger

This impressively realistic-looking Whataburger cake by Cake Central user sherylshirley is made of a snickerdoodle cake for buns, a brownie for a meat patty and is served with pound cake fries. The whole thing has me ready to exclaim “Whatacake!”

5 & 6. Subway

Most people know that any amazing looking cake is made using fondant, but if you’re wondering how someone goes about getting such perfect coloration on a Subway sandwich cake, the secret is an airbrush. And this cake proves that Danielle Irby is a true master when it comes to airbrushing confections into a work of art (or a sandwich, as the situation may require).

This three-foot long cake was made by Cake Central user milmil95 for a Subway franchise owner’s birthday. It looked so real that the birthday boy was actually bummed out to see his friends just got him a sub sandwich for his birthday and he didn’t believe it was a cake until someone cut it.

7 & 8. KFC

A lot of the KFC cakes out there either incorporate actual buckets from the chain or at least the logo printed out on edible paper. So Laura Loukaides’ cake shows an amazing amount of skill and ingenuity: She actually painted and cut the design into fondant as she created her own bucket. And the chicken looks pretty real too—though not as extra crispy as many KFC fans like it.

Admittedly, the chicken and fries inside these KFC boxes aren’t quite as realistic looking as the one above, but the corn and beans look pretty spot on and the presentation—using a number of KFC boxes—makes this sweet assortment a pretty delightful tribute to the chicken restaurant. Cake Central user kerplunksky made these goodie boxes for a friend to give to her husband on Valentine’s Day. The fries, corn kernels and  chicken bones are made with fondant. The popcorn chicken is just rice krispie treats. The beans are Jelly Bellies covered in a gel glaze, and the chicken is butter cream frosting dipped in cookie crumbs.

9 & 10. Pizza Hut

While there are a lot of pizza cakes out there, one of the hardest parts is getting to make it look realistic—especially with all those nice colors the cheese gets as it bakes. This pizza by Cake Central user Barbend gets around that problem by looking like a pizza that is just about ready to be popped into the oven. It’s a fun way to celebrate a Pizza Hut employee's birthday.

Sure, kids love pizza—but they really, really love cake. So just imagine the pleasant surprise on the face of the little girls who got to eat this great cake from Julia of Cake You Up. Julia actually cooked the cake in a pizza pan and then served it in a Pizza Hut box. The pepperoni is candy melts.

11. Taco Bell

This might just be the most realistic taco cake ever made. What’s even more fantastic is that it comes with a Big Bell Meal Box and salsa—both of which are totally edible. This impressive combo meal of cake was created by Jenni Blackburn of Crème de la Crème Cakery.

12. Chipotle

Those who prefer Chipotle over Taco Bell in the burrito wars will almost certainly prefer this 3D cake version of a Chipotle burrito. As if showing the layers of beans, lettuce, and rice wasn’t enough, Elaine of Enticing Cake Boutique even perched the whole thing on a pile of fondant tortilla chips.

Of course, the true measure of any cake is how it tastes, so the real question here is: do any of these actually taste like the fast food concoctions they are aspiring to look like? Let’s hope the answer is no.

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Bleat Along to Classic Holiday Tunes With This Goat Christmas Album
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Feeling a little Grinchy this month? The Sweden branch of ActionAid, an international charity dedicated to fighting global poverty, wants to goat—errr ... goad—you into the Christmas spirit with their animal-focused holiday album: All I Want for Christmas is a Goat.

Fittingly, it features the shriek-filled vocal stylings of a group of festive farm animals bleating out classics like “Jingle Bells,” “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer,” and “O Come All Ye Faithful.” The recording may sound like a silly novelty release, but there's a serious cause behind it: It’s intended to remind listeners how the animals benefit impoverished communities. Goats can live in arid nations that are too dry for farming, and they provide their owners with milk and wool. In fact, the only thing they can't seem to do is, well, sing. 

You can purchase All I Want for Christmas is a Goat on iTunes and Spotify, or listen to a few songs from its eight-track selection below.

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What Are the 12 Days of Christmas?
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Everyone knows to expect a partridge in a pear tree from your true love on the first day of Christmas ... But when is the first day of Christmas?

You'd think that the 12 days of Christmas would lead up to the big day—that's how countdowns work, as any year-end list would illustrate—but in Western Christianity, "Christmas" actually begins on December 25th and ends on January 5th. According to liturgy, the 12 days signify the time in between the birth of Christ and the night before Epiphany, which is the day the Magi visited bearing gifts. This is also called "Twelfth Night." (Epiphany is marked in most Western Christian traditions as happening on January 6th, and in some countries, the 12 days begin on December 26th.)

As for the ubiquitous song, it is said to be French in origin and was first printed in England in 1780. Rumors spread that it was a coded guide for Catholics who had to study their faith in secret in 16th-century England when Catholicism was against the law. According to the Christian Resource Institute, the legend is that "The 'true love' mentioned in the song is not an earthly suitor, but refers to God Himself. The 'me' who receives the presents refers to every baptized person who is part of the Christian Faith. Each of the 'days' represents some aspect of the Christian Faith that was important for children to learn."

In debunking that story, Snopes excerpted a 1998 email that lists what each object in the song supposedly symbolizes:

2 Turtle Doves = the Old and New Testaments
3 French Hens = Faith, Hope and Charity, the Theological Virtues
4 Calling Birds = the Four Gospels and/or the Four Evangelists
5 Golden Rings = the first Five Books of the Old Testament, the "Pentateuch", which gives the history of man's fall from grace.
6 Geese A-laying = the six days of creation
7 Swans A-swimming = the seven gifts of the Holy Spirit, the seven sacraments
8 Maids A-milking = the eight beatitudes
9 Ladies Dancing = the nine Fruits of the Holy Spirit
10 Lords A-leaping = the ten commandments
11 Pipers Piping = the eleven faithful apostles
12 Drummers Drumming = the twelve points of doctrine in the Apostle's Creed

There is pretty much no historical evidence pointing to the song's secret history, although the arguments for the legend are compelling. In all likelihood, the song's "code" was invented retroactively.

Hidden meaning or not, one thing is definitely certain: You have "The Twelve Days of Christmas" stuck in your head right now.

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