19 Mother's Day Gifts to Show Mom You Love Her

iStock
iStock

From mouth-watering gourmet chocolate to gear for outdoor adventures, these Mother's Day gifts are perfect for all Mom's interests.

1. HERB GARDEN CANDLE; $25

Herb Garden Candle
Apollo Box

When this herb-scented candle is finished burning, the container can serve as a rustic planter for a mini herb garden. Included is a plantable paper disc containing oregano, basil, and parsley seeds. All you need is dirt.

Find It: Apollo Box

2. FOODIE DICE; $24

Foodie Dice

These dice are perfect for days when mom needs a little inspiration for dinner. The nine dice are engraved with options for protein, grains/carbs, vegetables, and more. With 186,000 possible combinations, it should take care of planning family meals for a while.

Find It: UncommonGoods

3. NEAPOLITAN ICE CREAM CONES; $45

ice cream cone cups

These whimsical Neapolitan-colored ice cream cone dishes are perfect for enjoying high-end gelato or a little Ben & Jerry's.

Find It: Fishs Eddy

4. CHOCOLATE TOTE BOX; $29

MarieBelle Chocolate Ganache Tote Box

MarieBelle New York specializes in ganaches decorated with edible artwork. This eight-piece set of handmade chocolates is packaged in a tote bag-shaped gift box.

Find It: MarieBelle

5. HEXAGON GLASS CATCH-ALL DISH; $12

Hexagon Glass Catch-All Dish

Double up: This glass hexagon dish will upgrade any bedside table, while also storing jewelry, car keys, or change.

Find It: Urban Outfitters

6. MOM'S GOT THIS FEMINIST MUG; $18

mom's got this mug

Show her how much you appreciate her Rosie outlook with this ceramic mug inspired by the iconic cultural icon. The cup is available in standard 11-ounce size, a tall 12-ounce container, or a 15-ounce travel mug.

Find It: RedBubble

7. LOLLIA RELAX GIFT SET; $69

bath set

Help Mom get into a Zen state of mind with this bath gift set from Lollia, which includes lavender and honey-scented bar soap, hand cream, and a candle with a crystal charm.

Find It: Margot Elena

8. RECCHIUTI CONFECTIONS CHOCOLATE; $48

Recchiuti Confections chocolates

She'll love the sweets in this box from top luxury chocolatier Recchiuti, where every piece is made by hand. Featured ingredients for this box of beautifully-designed truffles include hazelnuts from Italy, peppermint from Willamette Valley, and coffee from Hawaii.

Find It: Recchiuti Confections

9. COFFEE SOAP; $7

Coffee soap
Courtesy of RockyTopSoapShop

For the mom who can never get enough coffee: This fragrant handmade vegan soap is made from a strong pot of organic java. Plus, the coffee grounds act as natural exfoliants.

Find It: Etsy

10. MONET GARDEN AT ARGENTEUIL SCARF; $65

Monet scarf
The Metropolitan Museum of Art Store

Mom will feel very distinguished in this luxurious Monet silk scarf from the gift shop of New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art. It's printed with Claude Monet's Camille Monet in the Garden at Argenteuil.

Find It: The Metropolitan Museum of Art Store

11. WOOD AND SLATE WINE TASTER'S BOARD; $25

Wood and Slate Wine Taster's Board
UncommonGoods

Tasting boards aren't only for beer. This tray—made from acacia wood and slate—can hold up to four glasses. Soapstone chalk included.

Find It: UncommonGoods

12. STEMLESS AERATING WINE GLASSES; $56

Stemless Aerating Wine Glass
Amazon

When mom pours her wine into the interior chamber of this glass, she can watch it become perfectly aerated. This set of two is made of dishwasher-safe pyrex glass.

Find It: Amazon

13. WINE CHILLER SET; $40

wine chillers
Apollo Box

Regular ice cubes can water down a glass of wine, but these wine twirls (made of food-safe resin) act as a brilliant substitute: Pop them in the freezer and then into your glass and you'll have chilled wine that won't get diluted. This set comes with two twirls and two stemless wine glasses.

Find It: Apollo Box

14. LOOFAH SOAP; $12

loofah soap
Amazon

Give Mom the spa-treatment with this toxin-free loofah dipped in fragrant soap. The loofah is sourced from a gourd plant, so it's eco-friendly, while the soap features moisturizing coconut oil.

Find It: Amazon

15. BRUNCH GIFT BASKET; $70

brunch gift basket

Want to make your mom breakfast in bed on Mother's Day, but can't cook? This complete brunch gift basket from Harry & David has everything: triple cheese and caramelized onion quiche, Canadian bacon, English muffins, maple syrup butter, and lemon poppyseed Bundt cake.

Find It: Harry & David

16. FORSAKE ALMA; $150

Forsake boots
Forsake

Buying for a shoe-loving mom who’s both sporty and chic? Look no further than Forsake’s Alma wedge bootie. Made of waterproof leather and sporting “peak-to-pavement” traction, these shoes are comfortable right out of the box—we walked 5 miles in the pair Forsake sent us to test and our feet didn’t hurt a bit.

Find It: Forsake

17. MYSTERY RANCH SUPER BOOTY BAG; $99

Mystery Ranch bag
Mystery Ranch

This 28-liter nylon bag—which can be used as either a backpack or a tote—is perfect for the mom needs to lug clothes and shoes to the gym, bring groceries back from the store, or take a weekend trip. (Mystery Ranch gave us a bag to test, and we used it for all three.) In addition to its roomy main compartment, there’s a front compartment, a zippered exterior pocket, and exterior access to a compartment that will fit a 15-inch laptop.

Find It: Mystery Ranch

18. RED ANTS PANTS; $139

Red Ants Pants
Red Ants Pants

These work pants are tailor-made for ladies to wear while they're outdoors getting stuff done like a boss, from gardening to chopping wood. Made of cotton canvas duck cloth, they have reinforcements in the front legs and seat, a high-cut back for maximum coverage, and three pockets designed for a pencil, notebook, and knife.

Find It: Red Ants Pants

19. THE SILL’S MOTHER’S DAY BUNDLES; $65-$68

The Sill plant set
The Sill

Moms with green thumbs will love The Sill’s Mother’s Day bundles. Get a bird’s nest fern and a “plant mom” tote for $65; a trio of tiny succulents for $67.50; three air plants and a “plant mom” pin for $66; or a hedgehog aloe and tote for $66. All plants come in The Sill’s pots (except for the airplants; those come on little metal stands).

Find It: The Sill

7 Ways to Take Advantage of the Bullet Journal Method

iStock.com/Neustockimages
iStock.com/Neustockimages

If you haven't heard of the bullet journal, it's the productivity method du jour—one that combines the features of a planner, calendar, to-do list, diary, and more. It's not a specific product (although the founder of the method, Ryder Carroll, has created a special notebook for it) as much as a way of creating a journaling system that works for you.

Proponents say the method helps you focus your time and your goals, in part through periodic "migration" sessions that force you to review how you've been spending your days. And yes, it's popular on Instagram—because many bullet journalers have filled their notebooks with colorful flair. (But that part is entirely optional.)

While core components of the bullet journal system like monthly spreads and daily logs are great, many bullet journalers like to add other features that fit their own life. After all, the beauty of the method is the customization and flexibility. We've rounded up a few ideas for new and not-so-new bullet journalers alike to try.

1. Track—and fuel—your creative projects.

Let's say that, like most people, you have a day job. But at night, you're writing the next Great American Novel—or at least some short stories. You might get an idea related to one of those projects on your morning commute or while taking a walk in the park at lunch. There's no time to pull out the manuscript, and if you email yourself the idea it might get lost in a jumble of newsletters and other alerts.

Instead, just start a new page for the project in your journal, note it in your index, and scribble away. You can come back to it later, and fill in other, non-sequential pages in the journal as the mood strikes. Your journal probably isn't the best place to write whole stories, but it's perfect if you just had a mini-breakthrough you want to take down, or even as a way to keep track of potential prompts and inspiration.

2. Improve your habits.

Habit trackers are some of the most popular add-ons to the regular bullet journal time-oriented spreads. You can make yours cute—tracking the number of glasses of water you drink a day by coloring in a big glass, say—or more minimalist, perhaps by listing the habits you want to build (yoga, waking up early) on the left next to a chart of days and coloring in the days you manage to do the habit. You can also create a page just to log you often you do one particular thing—drinking alcohol, for example. Some people even use their bullet journals to track food and digestive symptoms, either by creating a section for a food journal or just noting in their daily log when they eat a certain food and how it makes them feel.

3. Save money.

You can create a custom spread for your monthly budget, track all your expenses, or just track your purchases in a particular category (say, eating out) if there's a particular type of spending you're trying to curb. The design can be as crafty as you like—whether you're coloring in bricks that represent each $50 saved toward a house or just filling in columns noting every time you make a purchase. The key is that, as with health habits, writing something down can serve as a powerful motivator and/or deterrent, since you know you'll have to come face-to-face with yourself at the end of the month.

4. Plan your meals.

Nothing combines health and finance goals quite like planning your meals. You can make your meal plan a section of your weekly spread: Carroll, the bullet journal's creator, likes to set up a list of meals on the left page of his notebook and a shopping list of ingredients on the right. Dividing the items by categories (like meat, produce, and pantry staples) can speed things up at the store, too. It's great to do this at home so you can check the fridge and see what you're missing. Then, when you're done shopping, note how much you spent at the bottom of the list. You can track that to develop insights about your grocery budget.

Over time, you can also create lists to help you with meal planning, perhaps "Favorite Weeknight Dinners," "Easy Work Lunches," etc. Some people also like to create a master grocery list of frequently bought items they can consult whenever they're at the store, just in case they forget to write staples down on their weekly shopping list.

5. Remember the good things.

In our flurry of to-do lists, project deadlines, and meal plans, it can be easy to forget about the things that brighten our days, whether it's an especially funny joke from a colleague or a milestone in a child's development. Create a "memories" page (don't forget to log it in your index!) where you record the great stuff that happens, and pull it out to reflect whenever you're having a gray day. Some bullet journalers like to put pages like this toward the back of their journals to separate them out from the time-oriented spreads. A memories page is also a great opportunity to bust out some thematic artwork.

6. Track your reading lists.

Another great way to encourage better habits is through a reading log. Like a memory log, many people like to put this toward the back of their journal, although ultimately the placement is totally up to you. You can keep track of all the books you read this year, perhaps with notes on what you thought of them—a definite resource when you're drawing up those year-end best-of lists to share with other reading pals!

7. Pair it with an app.

While the bullet journal is touted as "the analog method for the digital age," most of us don't want to go full-on analog. There's now an official companion app that will help you organize and search your old bullet journals, help you learn the method, offer prompts, and serve as a log for when you're away from your journal. It's designed as an addition to the journal, not a replacement, so you still need to put in that time with pen (or pencil, or watercolor brush) and paper.

Bullet journals also pair well with apps like Evernote—for example, you can use Evernote on your smartphone to snap photos of text you scrawl down to save digitally for later use. (Maybe those on-the-fly notes on your novel go into an Evernote notebook that you consult when you have a bit more time, for example.) That's a good option for longer-term projects that might span a couple notebooks.

Many people also use both bullet journals and an online calendar, using the latter for fixed events like birthdays and doctors appointments and the former as more of a way to time-block the day and focus on goals. After all, the beauty of the bullet journal is that unlike digital space, the paper in your notebook is finite—which helps you realize that so is your time and energy. That makes it easier to plan accordingly.

This Ingenious Hanger Makes Hanging Pants a Breeze, No Clips or Folds Required

Hurdle Hanger
Hurdle Hanger

Get ready to clean out your closet. No, we don’t mean going all Marie Kondo on your clothes. There’s a new type of clothes hanger that promises to change the way you store your clothes, taking the headache out of hanging up your pants.

The Hurdle Hanger, which has currently raised more than $33,000 on Kickstarter, calls itself the “one-second pants hanger.” Rather than relying on cumbersome clips or requiring bulky folding techniques, the hanger design employs one very simple change: It hooks into the belt loops of your pants.

The angular hanger is open on one side so that you can slide the bar through the belt loops of your pants, letting you secure your pants in one smooth motion rather than struggling with the pant clips that will just wrinkle your waistband anyway.

A person slides the Hurdle Hanger through the belt loops of a pants to hang them.
Hurdle Hanger

Just slide the hanger bar through the belt loop (or loops) farthest from you, then hang the belt loop closest to you from the hook. There is another hook midway across the bar that secures the middle belt loop, keeping your pants from drooping while they hang. In another subtle touch, you can use the same hook to hang smaller items, like belts or hats, off the side.

The Hurdle Hanger is an example of smart design at its finest—the kind of idea that, when you see it in action, makes you think, “Wait, how did no one think of this before?” It takes a once-cumbersome task and makes it seamless, eliminating at least some of the burden that may be keeping you from accomplishing the chore of hanging up your clothes. No more messing with clips or trying to shove pants through the cramped hole in the hanger to fold them over.

There are already open-end pants hangers that make it easier to slide a folded pair of slacks into your closet, but the belt loop hooks take the Hurdle Hanger to another level. You might even get inspired enough to start hanging your jeans.

A 10-pack of hangers is $20 on Kickstarter—though anything that makes you actively excited to organize your closet is priceless.

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