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Hulton Archive/Getty Images
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Some of Your Favorite Movies, Books, and Music Are About to Enter the Public Domain

Hulton Archive/Getty Images
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

In America, copyright terms have serious staying power. Thanks to several laws involving, in part, Mickey Mouse, the U.S. government has extended copyright protections for decades past what other countries require, effectively keeping any work published after 1922 firmly out of the public domain to this day. That means you can’t legally use images and artistic works without permission from (and probably payment to) the owner of the copyright. But soon, a new batch of work is set to enter the public domain, marking the first time that has happened in decades, according to The Atlantic. That means you’ll be able to use, remix, and even sell those works without getting into legal trouble.

In most other countries, literature, art, films, music, and certain other creative works are under copyright for the life of their author plus some number of years (in many places, it’s 50 or 70 years). For instance, people in Canada and New Zealand became able to use the works of artists like Woody Guthrie without worrying about copyright infringement in 2018.

But Americans are still waiting to use works published in the 1920s. In the U.S., a 1976 law extended copyright protections on everything created between 1923 and 1977 (and beyond) to 75 years, putting work published in 1922 into the public domain in 1998. Then, a 1998 law extended those copyright terms further to 95 years after first publication, protecting anything made after 1922. So copyrighted work from 1923 on wouldn’t enter the public domain until 2019 or later.

All this has kept archival resources like the Internet Archive and Google Books from releasing digital versions of old books, kept TV shows from freely using common songs (like, until recently, “Happy Birthday”), and otherwise stifled cheap and easy access to older works of art and culture.

The time has finally come for works from 1923 to enter the public domain in the U.S. This will include books like Virginia Woolf’s Mrs Dalloway in Bond Street and Robert Frost’s New Hampshire, which includes the poem “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening”—a poem that, despite its popularity, has been strictly controlled by his estate up to this point. Other books from authors like Aldous Huxley, D.H. Lawrence, e.e. cummings, and H.G. Wells will also be released into the public domain, as will plenty of films and sheet music. Considering that It’s a Wonderful Life only became a holiday classic when it entered into the public domain due to a clerical error, plenty of other forgotten works might become classics once they are released for royalty-free use next year.

In the meantime, check out some films that are already in the public domain, like Charlie Chaplin’s The Gold Rush. And mark your calendar: Mickey Mouse could be headed to the public domain as early as 2024.

[h/t The Atlantic]

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12 Fascinating Facts About Rick Moranis
George De Sota, Getty Images
George De Sota, Getty Images

Beloved for his film roles in the 1980s and 1990s, Rick Moranis played perfect iterations of an endearing geek in Ghostbusters (1984), Little Shop of Horrors (1986), Spaceballs (1987), Honey, I Shrunk the Kids (1989), and The Flintstones (1994), amongst others. But in 1997, to the consternation of his many fans, he walked away from it all to focus on raising his family. Although Moranis has been mostly out of the limelight since then, he's kept busy with music and voice work, and he hasn't ruled out the option of appearing on screen again (fingers crossed).

In honor of his 65th birthday, here are some things you might not know about Rick Moranis.

1. HE GOT HIS BIG BREAK THANKS TO A CANADIAN TELEVISION CONTENT REGULATION.

After working at a Toronto radio station after high school, Moranis appeared on a sketch comedy show on the CBC called Second City TV. The show, which was in its third season when Moranis joined in 1980, legally had to devote a few minutes of airtime in each episode to “identifiable Canadian content.” In other words, Canadian television had to contain some Canada-related content, which Moranis found silly.

After the crew went home, Moranis and fellow actor Dave Thomas satirized the requirement by improvising the characters of Bob and Doug McKenzie, two stereotypically Canadian brothers. The sketch filled the extra airtime with Canadian content, and audiences loved Bob and Doug. Moranis and Thomas portrayed the McKenzie brothers in the 1983 film Strange Brew (which they also wrote and directed), and their comedy album The Great White North got a Grammy nomination for Best Comedy Album in 1983.

2. HE COUNTS FILMING LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS AS ONE OF HIS LUCKIEST MOMENTS.

In 1986, Moranis starred as florist Seymour Krelborn in the film adaptation of the musical Little Shop of Horrors. As he told The Hollywood Reporter in 2015: "I'm the luckiest guy to get that … It was timing, and I fit the right type. It was an amazing experience. One of the greatest moments of my life was shooting that thing."

3. HE STARRED IN A PEPSI COMMERCIAL.

In 1995, Moranis starred in a funny Pepsi commercial, playing twins separated at birth—one twin is in America, while the other grows up in Germany. One sunny day, the twins telepathically connect via the power of drinking Pepsi.

4. HE LEFT HOLLYWOOD TO BECOME A STAY-AT-HOME DAD.

In 1991, Moranis's wife died of breast cancer, and he had to reshuffle his priorities in order to take care of his two young children. In a 2005 interview with USA Today, he explained that he stopped making movies in 1996 because he couldn't juggle being a stay-at-home dad and traveling to make movies. "I took a little bit of a break. And the little bit of a break turned into a longer break, and then I found that I really didn't miss it," Moranis said.

5. HE HAS DONE VOICE WORK ON A FEW ANIMATED MOVIES.

Although Moranis shifted his focus from movies to raising kids, he never completely retired. In 2001, he did voice work as both the Toy Taker and Mr. Cuddles the Teddy Bear in the animated film Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer & the Island of Misfit Toys. In 2003, he voiced Rutt in the animated film Brother Bear, and reprised the role for its 2006 sequel, Brother Bear 2.

6. HE'S A GRAMMY-NOMINATED MUSICIAN.

In 2005, Moranis let the world know about his love of country music. The Agoraphobic Cowboy is a comedy album comprised of 13 songs inspired by alternative country and bluegrass. Although Moranis admitted that the album began as a lark, it was nominated for a Grammy in 2006 for Best Comedy Album. "I started writing a song," Moranis told Billboard. "I wrote one, and then another one. I was singing them to a couple of friends, and they'd be relatively amused."

7. HIS JEWISH UPBRINGING INSPIRED HIS MOST RECENT ALBUM.

In 2013, Moranis released another musical comedy album called My Mother's Brisket & Other Love Songs. Thematically, Moranis focused on his Jewish upbringing, and he used a mix of klezmer and jazz sounds on songs like "The Seven Days of Shiva" and "Live Blogging The Himel Family Bris." The best part? The deluxe pack of the album comes with a purple yarmulke.

8. HE'S STILL GOT TONS OF FANS.

Moranis lives in Manhattan and often gets recognized on the street. As he told The Hollywood Reporter in 2015, "People are very nice when they see me." Moranis attributes some of his enduring influence to his clean style of comedy. "We were governed by a certain kind of taste at that time, and there were places we wouldn't go with language and bodily fluids and functions. I think that's what [fans are] nostalgic for."

9. HE NEVER SOUGHT FAME FOR ITS OWN SAKE.

Moranis says he never decided to be an actor for the fame. Rather, he focused on the art itself, and fame and publicity followed. “The need to do publicity and everything other than the work is not something that I set out to do," Moranis told Heeb in 2013. "For some people it is. They want that. They want the connection to the audience. They want their name in the paper. For me, that was just a by-product of the work's success. I didn't really seek out any of that stuff." He also didn't seek out celebrity friends; he told the magazine that he hasn't kept up with any of his co-stars in more than 20 years.

10. HE AVOIDS AIRPLANES BUT ISN'T AFRAID OF FLYING.

In an interview in 2013, Moranis revealed that he avoids airplanes in favor of driving, but not because he's afraid of flying. Moranis dislikes the dragged out process of flying, from getting to the airport a couple hours early to dealing with sick seatmates. “We started to hear the stories of people stuck on the tarmac for six hours," he said. "If that happens to me, I'll be on the front page of the New York Post the next day. I'll fake a heart attack or melt down. So it’s better for me to stay away from airports."

11. HE DECLINED A ROLE IN THE GHOSTBUSTERS REBOOT.

Although original Ghostbusters stars Dan Aykroyd, Bill Murray, Ernie Hudson, and Sigourney Weaver all appeared in Paul Feig's Ghostbusters reboot, Moranis wasn't among them. As he told The Hollywood Reporter in 2015, he was offered a cameo role but declined: “I wish them well. I hope it's terrific. But it just makes no sense to me. Why would I do just one day of shooting on something I did 30 years ago?”

12. HE'LL BE BACK ONSCREEN AS SOON AS HE FINDS AN INTERESTING ROLE.

Although Moranis's acting hiatus has lasted more than 20 years, he may act again. His two kids are in their twenties now, and he says he'll act again once he finds an interesting role. “I still get the occasional query about a film or television role, and as soon as one comes along that piques my interest, I'll probably do it,” Moranis said last year. "I'm happy with the things I said yes to, and I'm very happy with the many things I've said no to. Yes, I am picky, and I'll continue to be picky. Picky has worked for me."

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Helen Maybanks, (c) RSC
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Royal Shakespeare Company Auctions Off Costumes Worn By Ian McKellen, Judi Dench, Patrick Stewart, and More
Helen Maybanks, (c) RSC
Helen Maybanks, (c) RSC

The stages of the Royal Shakespeare Company in Stratford-upon-Avon, England have been graced by some of the most celebrated performers of our day. Now, the legendary theater company is giving fans a chance to own the original costumes that helped bring their characters to life. On April 17, more than 50 costumes worn in RSC productions will hit eBay to raise money for the group's Stitch in Time campaign.

With this new campaign, the RSC aims to raise enough money to renovate the aging workshop where costume designers create all the handmade garments used in their shows. Following a play's run, the costumes are either rented out to other theaters or kept safe in the company's museum collections. Designers often make duplicates of the items, which means that the RSC is able to auction off some of their most valuable pieces to the public.

The eBay costume auction includes clothing worn by some of the most prolific actors to work with the company. Bidders will find Patrick Stewart's beige shorts from the 2006 production of Antony and Cleopatra, David Tennant's white tunic from 2013's Richard II, Ian McKellen's red, floor-length coat from 2007's King Lear, and Judi Dench's black doublet from 2016's Shakespeare Live! Costumes worn by Anita Dobson, Susannah York, and Simon Russell Beale will also be featured.

All proceeds from the auction go to restoring the RSC's costume workshop. Shakespeare fans have until April 27 to place their bids.

Patrick Stewart in Antony and Cleopatra.
Pascal Molliere, (c) RSC

Actors in stage play.
Manuel Harlan, (c) RSC

Actor in stage play.
Kwame Lestrade, (c) RSC

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