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New App Uses Crowdsourcing to Find You an EpiPen in an Emergency

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Many people at risk for severe allergic reactions to things like peanuts and bee stings carry EpiPens. These tools inject the medication epinephrine into one's bloodstream to control immune responses immediately. But exposure can turn into life-threatening situations in a flash: Without EpiPens, people could suffer anaphylactic shock in less than 15 minutes as they wait for an ambulance. Being without an EpiPen or other auto-injector can have deadly consequences.

EPIMADA, a new app created by researchers at Israel's Bar-Ilan University, is designed to save the lives of people who go into anaphylactic shock when they don't have EpiPens handy. The app uses the same type of algorithms that ride-hailing services use to match drivers and riders by location—in this case, EPIMADA matches people in distress with nearby strangers carrying EpiPens. David Schwartz, director of the university's Social Intelligence Lab and one of the app's co-creators, told The Jerusalem Post that the app currently has hundreds of users. Registered users are required to have an epinephrine prescription, and must apply (by emailing abigailk@mda.org.il) to join the community.

EPIMADA serves as a way to crowdsource medication from fellow patients who might be close by and able to help. While it may seem unlikely that people would rush to give up their own expensive life-saving tool for a stranger, EPIMADA co-creator Michal Gaziel Yablowitz, a doctoral student in the Social Intelligence Lab, explained in a press release that "preliminary research results show that allergy patients are highly motivated to give their personal EpiPen to patient-peers in immediate need."

EpiPen is easy to use, so even though fellow allergy sufferers may not have medical training, it's a relatively low-risk venture to ask them to treat a stranger the same way they'd treat themselves. The tool could be especially useful for children, who may be most likely to forget their EpiPens.

The app is currently available only in Israel, but the idea could be applicable across the world, for multiple life-threatening conditions. The researchers are collaborating on similar patient-to-patient apps elsewhere, including one in Philadelphia connecting people who carry the opioid overdose reversal medication naloxone.

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Scientists May Have Pinpointed How Much Exercise Your Heart Needs to Stay Healthy
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There’s really no limit to the benefits of exercise, from cognitive improvement to increased cardiovascular capacity to more energy. But one of the biggest reasons to maintain a fitness regimen is to ward off chronic conditions. For example, exercise helps keep arteries from stiffening as we age, which lowers our risk of heart disease.

"Get some exercise," however, isn't exactly specific advice. Is twice a week good enough? Three times a week? Five? And for how long each time?

Researchers in Dallas, Texas may have found an answer. According to Newsweek, a study by staff at the Institute for Exercise and Environmental Medicine and area hospitals looked at 102 people, aged 60 and over, who self-identified as either sedentary, casual, committed, or master-level exercisers. They worked out anywhere from almost never to daily. The researchers found that casual exercise (two to three times weekly, 30 minutes each session) was associated with keeping the mid-sized arteries, like those found in the head and neck, from aging prematurely. But four to five sessions per week helped stabilize the larger central arteries, which send blood to the chest and abdomen. The research was published in the Journal of Physiology.

The study did not look at the type of exercise performed or other lifestyle choices that may have affected the participants' arterial health. But when it comes to moving your body to keep your arteries limber, it seems safe to say that more is better.

[h/t Newsweek]

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Health
The First Shot to Stop Chronic Migraines Just Secured FDA Approval
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Migraine sufferers unhappy with current treatments will soon have a new option to consider. Aimovig, a monthly shot, just received approval from the Food and Drug Administration and is now eligible for sale, CBS News reports. The shot is the first FDA-approved drug of its kind designed to stop migraines before they start and prevent them over the long term.

As Mental Floss reported back in February before the drug was cleared, the new therapy is designed to tackle a key component of migraine pain. Past studies have shown that levels of a protein called calcitonin gene–related peptide (CGRP) spike in chronic sufferers when they're experiencing the splitting headaches. In clinical trials, patients injected with the CGRP-blocking medicine in Aimovig saw their monthly migraine episodes cut in half (from eight a month to just four). Some subjects reported no migraines at all in the month after receiving the shot.

Researchers have only recently begun to untangle the mysteries of chronic migraine treatment. Until this point, some of the best options patients had were medications that weren't even developed to treat the condition, like antidepressants, epilepsy drugs, and Botox. In addition to yielding spotty results, many of these treatments also come with severe side effects. The most serious side effects observed in the Aimovig studies were colds and respiratory infections.

Monthly Aimovig shots will cost $6900 a year without insurance. Now that the drug has been approved, a flood of competitors will likely follow: This year alone, three similar shots are expected to receive FDA clearance.

[h/t CBS News]

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