Why Your Knuckles Make That Satisfying Cracking Sound, According to Science

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Scientific curiosity is not always burdened by matters of great consequence. Over the years, considerable money and time has been applied to matters involving facial recognition between sheep, whether the flow of urine is impeded by someone watching you pee, and whether humans can capably swim in a pool full of syrup. (They can, almost as well as water.)

Now, researchers from Stanford University and Ecole Polytechnique in France have turned the roving eye of science to the phenomenon of knuckle-cracking. According to Gizmodo, a computer simulation was created to confirm an earlier theory that the audible noise that comes from the human hand after putting pressure on the knuckle was the result of gas bubbles popping inside the finger joint.

Conclusion: Probably true.

The study, published in Scientific Reports, demonstrated that microscopic bubbles inside the lubricating synovial fluid of the joint collapse when a knuckle-cracking session commences. To use an imperfect analogy, the cavitation bubbles are like the body’s Bubble Wrap. Popping them produces an audible—and for many, a very pleasing—sound.

To compile data, researchers took geometric representations of the joint's movements during a cracking session and turned them into mathematical equations. (Imaging has not been shown to be very productive in this field, as the crack takes only about 300 milliseconds and is not easily visualized.) The software models demonstrated that pressure shifts in the joint fluid increase pressure on the gas bubbles. Unlike packing material, however, the gas bubbles don't really perforate—they experience a partial collapse but remain suspended in the joint.

So does this solve the mystery surrounding cracked knuckles? Not entirely. Because it was a simulation, there's a possibility of mathematical error. Proponents of alternative theories—that it's not bubbles collapsing but bubbles being created that produce the noise—feel there's more work to be done. We can only hope a complete understanding will come in our lifetime. Fingers crossed. And cracking.

[h/t Gizmodo]

Why Is Pee Yellow?

Chloe Effron
Chloe Effron

WHY? is our attempt to answer all the questions every little kid asks. Do you have a question? Send it to why@mentalfloss.com.

Your body is kind of like a house. You bring things into your body by eating, drinking, and breathing. But just like the things we bring home to real houses, we don’t need every part of what we take in. So there are leftovers, or garbage. And if you let garbage sit around in your house or your body for too long, it gets gross and can make you sick. Your body takes out the garbage by peeing and pooping. These two things are part of your body’s excretory system (ECKS-krih-tore-eee SISS-tem), which is just a fancy way of saying “trash removal.” If your body is healthy, when you look in the toilet you should see brown poop and yellow pee.

Clear, light yellow pee is a sign that your excretory system and the rest of your body are working right. If your pee, or urine (YER-inn), is not see-through, that might mean you are sick. Dark yellow urine usually means that you aren’t drinking enough water. On the other hand, really pale or colorless pee can mean you might be drinking too much water! 

Your blood is filtered through two small organs called kidneys (KID-knees). Remember the garbage we talked about earlier? The chemicals called toxins (TOCK-sins) are like garbage in your blood. Your kidneys act like a net, catching the toxins and other leftovers and turning them into pee.

One part of your blood is called hemoglobin (HEE-moh-gloh-bin). This is what makes your blood red. Hemoglobin goes through a lot of changes as it passes through your body. When it reaches your kidneys, it turns yellow thanks to a chemical called urobilin (yer-ah-BY-lin). Urobilin is kind of like food coloring. The more water you add, the lighter it will be. That's why, if you see dark yellow pee in the toilet, it's time to ask your mom or dad for a cup of water. 

To learn more about pee, check out this article from Kids Health. 

Why Don’t We Fall Off the Earth?

Chloe Effron
Chloe Effron

WHY? is our attempt to answer all the questions every little kid asksHave a question? Send it to why@mentalfloss.com.

Do you know the saying “what goes up, must come down”? There’s a lot of truth to that. No matter how hard you hit that baseball or how high you get on the swings, you’re not going to make it into space (without a spaceship, of course). This is because of something called gravity (GRAV-it-ee). Gravity is the force that keeps you (and all your toys) from floating into space. 

The Earth’s gravity is a force that works kind of like a magnet. When you jump in the air, you come back down because gravity is pulling you towards the center of the Earth. Gravity does a lot more than just keep your feet on the ground. The strong pull of planets has created whole solar systems and galaxies. The Earth's gravity pulls in the Moon, which orbits (or circles) around it. Objects that orbit planets are called satellites (SAT-uh-lights). Some other planets have one or more moons of their own. The largest planet in our solar system, Jupiter, has 63 known moons! The Sun also has a gravitational (grav-uh-TAY-shun-ull) pull. It pulls all the planets in our solar system around it. Just like the Moon circles the Earth, the Earth circles the Sun.   

This force is something that all objects have—even you! The reason you don’t have tiny objects stuck to you is because you’re not big enough to have a strong enough pull. Even really big things like whales aren’t large enough to have a gravitational pull. Only really, really big things like stars, planets, and moons have it. 

The Moon is big enough to have its own pull. Its gravity tugs on the Earth's oceans. That's why we have ocean tides. But the Moon's gravity isn't as strong as the Earth’s. That’s why the astronauts who visited the Moon were able to jump really high. If those same astronauts went to a bigger planet, like Jupiter, the gravity would be a lot stronger. There, they would feel much heavier, and they wouldn't be able to jump much at all. People in spaceships are not near anything with a big gravitational force, so they can float in the air inside the spaceship. 

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