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17 Ancient Abandoned Websites That Still Work

The golden age of dial-up is over, but these Internet fossils will make you feel like it’s 1996 all over again.

1. Space Jam (1996)

A starry background, cheesy graphics, and Michael Jordan? It’s like 1996 left us a time capsule of awesome. 

2. Internet Explorer is EVIL! (1998)

When Microsoft made its users install Internet Explorer One, one customer wasn’t happy about the change.

3. Ask Dr. Internet (1996)

Ask Dr. Internet is one of the oldest question-and-answer relics on the web. Take that, Jeeves.

4. Three Rivers Stadium (1998)

Once home to the Pittsburgh Pirates and Steelers, Three Rivers Stadium had a date with the wrecking ball in 2000. The website remains in denial.

5. Fogcam! (1994)

The oldest continuously running webcam on the interwebs, FogCam has loomed over a San Francisco State University courtyard since 1994.

6. You’ve Got Mail (1998)


Warner Brothers still won’t close the book on the movie’s website.

7. Strawberry Pop-Tart Blow-Torches (1994)

Are you worried that your Pop-Tarts will turn your toaster into a flamethrower? There’s a site for that. Thanks, 1994!

8. The Robert Deniro Page (1999)

Stay updated on what Robert Deniro was doing 14 years ago.

9. Klingon Language Institute (1996)

From the beginning, the Internet has been the best place to nerd out.

10. CNN’s O.J. Simpson Trial Page (1996)

As eyes glued to the O.J. murder trial, CNN collected all of its coverage in this web portal.

11. Welcome to Netscape (1994)

Netscape may be gone, but the original communications site lives on. But remember, “To get around, just single-click on any blue or purple word or phrase.”

12. Fantasy Baseball Home Page (1996)

For those of us hoping that Fred McGriff, Greg Maddux, Tino Martinez, and Mo Vaughn will make a comeback.

13. Washington Post’s “Year in Review” (1996)

When the Macarena made front-page news.

14. Arngren (2004)

Includes: helicopters, Santa Claus, hovercraft, dinosaurs, robots, and one big design headache.

15. Bob Dole/Jack Kemp Presidential Campaign (1996)

In case Ross Perot is all you remember.

16. Amanda Please (2002)

Penelope Taynt’s obsession hasn’t waned, please.

17. Zombo (1999)

Wait for it, wait for it…

For more vintage websites, check out the archive of Internet fossils at {404} Page Found!

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Big Questions
How Are Balloons Chosen for the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade?
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The balloons for this year's Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade range from the classics like Charlie Brown to more modern characters who have debuted in the past few years, including The Elf On The Shelf. New to the parade this year are Olaf from Disney's Frozen and Chase from Paw Patrol. does the retail giant choose which characters will appear in the lineup?

Balloon characters are chosen in different ways. For example, in 2011, Macy’s requested B. Boy after parade organizers saw the Tim Burton retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art. (The company had been adding a series of art balloons to the parade lineup since 2005, which it called the Blue Sky Gallery.) When it comes to commercial balloons, though, it appears to be all about the Benjamins.

First-time balloons cost at least $190,000—this covers admission into the parade and the cost of balloon construction. After the initial year, companies can expect to pay Macy’s about $90,000 to get a character into the parade lineup. If you consider that the balloons are out for only an hour or so, that’s about $1500 a minute.

Have you got a Big Question you'd like us to answer? If so, let us know by emailing us at bigquestions@mentalfloss.com.

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fun
If You Can Solve This Puzzle, You Might Just Be Qualified to Be an Astronaut
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by Reader's Digest Editors

"What do you want to be when you grow up?"

Once a child hits kindergarten, the answer to this question starts to become a bit more reasonable. Sure, at age 3, little Jimmy wanted to be a dinosaur when he grew up, but by age 5, Jimmy realizes how preposterous this career path would be. After all, dinosaur graduate school is entirely too cost prohibitive nowadays.

Beginning in the latter half of the 20th century, more and more kids aspired to reach for the stars, stating firmly that when they grew up they would be an astronaut. And there might just be a way to test the viability of this claim, courtesy of British astronaut Tim Peake. Peake posted a puzzle pulled straight from his astronaut selection test to his Facebook page—can you figure it out?

Since he originally posted the puzzle on October 21, the brain-buster has been shared, liked, and commented on thousands of time.

 
See Also...
Welcome to the World's Most Useless Airport
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Good News—People Who Daydream in Meetings Are Actually Smarter!
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10 Myths About Frozen Food You Need to Stop Believing
 

Although the instructions may appear to be pretty vague, there is a correct answer; in the paraphrased words of Maxine Nightingale, the dot ends up right back where it started from, on the bottom.

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