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17 Ancient Abandoned Websites That Still Work

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The golden age of dial-up is over, but these Internet fossils will make you feel like it’s 1996 all over again.

1. Space Jam (1996)

A starry background, cheesy graphics, and Michael Jordan? It’s like 1996 left us a time capsule of awesome. 

2. Internet Explorer is EVIL! (1998)

When Microsoft made its users install Internet Explorer One, one customer wasn’t happy about the change.

3. Ask Dr. Internet (1996)

Ask Dr. Internet is one of the oldest question-and-answer relics on the web. Take that, Jeeves.

4. Three Rivers Stadium (1998)

Once home to the Pittsburgh Pirates and Steelers, Three Rivers Stadium had a date with the wrecking ball in 2000. The website remains in denial.

5. Fogcam! (1994)

The oldest continuously running webcam on the interwebs, FogCam has loomed over a San Francisco State University courtyard since 1994.

6. You’ve Got Mail (1998)

Warner Brothers still won’t close the book on the movie’s website.

7. Strawberry Pop-Tart Blow-Torches (1994)

Are you worried that your Pop-Tarts will turn your toaster into a flamethrower? There’s a site for that. Thanks, 1994!

8. The Robert Deniro Page (1999)

Stay updated on what Robert Deniro was doing 14 years ago.

9. Klingon Language Institute (1996)

From the beginning, the Internet has been the best place to nerd out.

10. CNN’s O.J. Simpson Trial Page (1996)

As eyes glued to the O.J. murder trial, CNN collected all of its coverage in this web portal.

11. Welcome to Netscape (1994)

Netscape may be gone, but the original communications site lives on. But remember, “To get around, just single-click on any blue or purple word or phrase.”

12. Fantasy Baseball Home Page (1996)

For those of us hoping that Fred McGriff, Greg Maddux, Tino Martinez, and Mo Vaughn will make a comeback.

13. Washington Post’s “Year in Review” (1996)

When the Macarena made front-page news.

14. Arngren (2004)

Includes: helicopters, Santa Claus, hovercraft, dinosaurs, robots, and one big design headache.

15. Bob Dole/Jack Kemp Presidential Campaign (1996)

In case Ross Perot is all you remember.

16. Amanda Please (2002)

Penelope Taynt’s obsession hasn’t waned, please.

17. Zombo (1999)

Wait for it, wait for it…

For more vintage websites, check out the archive of Internet fossils at {404} Page Found!

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Mike Mozart, Flickr // CC BY 2.0
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Knock-Off Versions of Nerf Ammo Can Cause Serious Eye Injuries
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Mike Mozart, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

Nerf toy guns and their foam projectiles, as marketed and manufactured by Hasbro, are virtually harmless when used as instructed. But, as reported by CNN, a recent paper in the UK medical journal BMJ Case Reports is providing a reality check when it comes to using the mock weapons and off-brand ammo improperly.

Three unrelated patients were treated at Moorfields Eye Hospital in London with ocular injuries that were sustained as a result of being "shot" with Nerf guns. Two adults had bleeding and inflammation in the eye; one 11-year-old had bleeding, inflammation, and damage to the outer retinal layer. All three suffered what the paper described as "significant ocular trauma." Attending doctors treated their swelling, and all symptoms resolved within a few weeks.

So what happened? In the case of one patient, a Nerf play session went awry as a result of using non-licensed ammo that isn't subject to Hasbro's quality control measures and may be made of harder materials as a result. On their Nerf landing page, Hasbro cautions users to "never modify any Nerf blasters or other Nerf products. Use only the darts, water, rounds, and discs designed for specific Nerf blasters."

Pediatric ophthalmologists interviewed by CNN recommend that protective eyewear be used whenever anyone is playing with Nerf weapons. It's also advisable never to aim for the face when shooting and to avoid attempting to modify the weapons to shoot faster or farther.

[h/t CNN]

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Animals
Australian Charity Releases Album of Cat-Themed Ballads to Promote Feline Welfare
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iStock

An Australian animal charity is helping save the nation’s kitties one torch song at a time, releasing a feline-focused musical album that educates pet owners about how to properly care for their cats.

Around 35,000 cats end up in pounds, shelters, and rescue programs every year in the Australian state of New South Wales, according to the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA). Microchipping and fixing cats, along with keeping closer tabs on them, could help reduce this number. To get this message out, the RSPCA’s New South Wales chapter created Cat Ballads: Music To Improve The Lives Of Cats.

The five-track recording is campy and fur-filled, with titles like "Desex Me Before I Do Something Crazy" and "Meow Meow." But songs like “I Need You” might tug the heartstrings of ailurophiles with lyrics like “I guess that’s goodbye then/but you’ve done this before/the window's wide open/and so’s the back door/you might think I’m independent/but you’d be wrong.” There's also a special version of the song that's specifically designed for cats’ ears, featuring purring, bird tweets, and other feline-friendly noises.

Together, the tunes remind us how vulnerable our kitties really are, and provide a timely reminder for cat owners to be responsible parents to their furry friends.

“The Cat Ballads campaign coincides with kitten season, which is when our shelters receive a significantly higher number of unwanted kittens as the seasons change,” Dr. Jade Norris, a veterinary scientist with the RSPCA, tells Mental Floss. “Desexing cats is a critical strategy to reduce unwanted kittens.”

Listen to a song from Cat Ballads below, and visit the project’s website for the full rundown.

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