Spoiler Alert: Your Favorite Game of Thrones Character Is Probably Going to Die Next Season

HBO
HBO

From a face full of molten gold to a wedding day massacre, the creators of Game of Thrones have never been shy about killing their characters—yes, even beloved ones ­—and have continued to find new and inventive ways to off 'em over the course of seven seasons. While the epic series’ eighth (and final) season won’t arrive until 2019, HBO’s powers-that-be are already confirming what you probably knew was coming: A lot of people are going to die!

As Variety reports, several of the network’s executives were on hand at the INTV Conference in Israel to take part in a panel titled “The Best of HBO.” When talk turned to Game of Thrones, senior vice president of drama Francesca Orsi described approaching the final season as “a really powerful moment in our lives and our careers. None of the cast had received the scripts prior, and one by one they started falling down to their deaths.”

Orsi went on to say that even the table read of the final six episodes was pretty dramatic, and ended with the cast and crew standing up and applauding for a full 15 to 20 minutes. “It was amazing,” says Orsi. “By the very end, everyone looked down and looked up and tears were in their eyes.”

Of course, Game of Thrones’s eighth season won’t mark the end of HBO’s collaboration with George R.R. Martin. Orsi said the network is already planning “three, four, five spinoffs” of the rabidly popular series, noting that “it feels like corporate malfeasance to not continue it.” And these won’t be small-budget affairs. “$50 million [per season] would never fly for what we are trying to do,” Orsi said of the spinoffs, which have already enlisted writers Max Borenstein (Godzilla, Kong: Skull Island), Jane Goldman (Kick-Ass, Kingsman: The Secret Service), Brian Helgeland (L.A. Confidential, Mystic River), and Carly Wray (Mad Men, The Leftovers) to get cracking on the scripts. “We are going big,” Orsi confirmed.

In May 2017, Martin himself shared some details about the proposed projects on his blog:

“For what it's worth, I don't especially like the term ‘spinoff,’ and I don't think it really applies to these new projects. What we're talking about are new stories set in the ‘secondary universe’ (to borrow Tolkien's term) of Westeros and the world beyond, the world I created for A Song Of Ice and Fire. It is a world, and a pretty big one, and if there were 8 million stories in the naked city back in the '50s, just think how many more there are in an entire world, and one with thousands of years of recorded history.

“None of these new shows will be 'spinning off' from GOT in the traditional sense. We are not talking Joey or AfterMASH or even Frasier or Lou Grant, where characters from one show continue on to another. So all of you who were hoping for the further adventures of Hot Pie are doomed to disappointment. Every one of the concepts under discussion is a prequel, rather than a sequel. Some may not even be set on Westeros. Rather than 'spinoff' or 'prequel,' however, I prefer the term 'successor show.' That's what I've been calling them.”

Whatever you want to call them, HBO’s commitment to Martin’s work should be reassuring to fans who are dreading “The End” of Game of Thrones. Will it be enough to help you through the grieving process as you watch your favorite characters fall? Only time will tell.

[h/t: Variety]

How Much Is Game of Thrones Author George RR Martin Worth?

Kevin Winter, Getty Images
Kevin Winter, Getty Images

by Dana Samuel

Unsurprisingly, Game of Thrones took home another Emmy Award earlier this week for Outstanding Drama Series, which marked the series' third time winning the title. Of course, George RR Martin—the author who wrote the books that inspired the TV show, and the series' executive producer—celebrated the victory alongside ​the GoT cast.

For anyone who may be unfamiliar with Martin's work, he is the author of the A Song of Ice and Fire series, which is the epic fantasy series that lead to the Game of Thrones adaptation. Basically, we really we have him to thank for this seven-year roller coaster we've been on.

At 70 years old (his birthday was yesterday, September 20th), Martin has had a fairly lengthy career as an author, consisting of a number of screenplays and TV pilots before A Song of Ice and Fire, which, ​according to Daily Mail he wrote in the spirit of The Lord of the Rings.

 Cast and crew of Outstanding Drama Series winner 'Game of Thrones' pose in the press room during the 70th Emmy Awards at Microsoft Theater on September 17, 2018 in Los Angeles, California
Frazer Harrison, Getty Images

Martin sold the rights to his A Song of Ice and Fire series in 2007, and he truly owes the vast majority of his net worth to the success of his novels and the Game of Thrones TV series. So how much exactly is this acclaimed author worth? According to Daily Mail, Martin makes about $15 million annually from the TV show, and another $10 million from his successful literary works.

According to Celebrity Net Worth, that makes Martin's net worth about $65 million.

Regardless of his millions, Martin still lives a fairly modest life, and it's clear he does everything for his love of writing.

We'd like to extend a personal thank you to Martin for creating one of the most exciting and emotionally jarring storylines we've ever experienced.
We wish Game of Thrones could go ​on for 13 seasons, too!

The '90s PBS Shows We're Still Talking About Online, Mapped

Were you a Barney kid or an Arthur kid? Or maybe you were obsessed with the Teletubbies instead? Or maybe you're still that kid inside, off making PBS memes as an adult. You're never too old to appreciate public television's kids programming, if the recent box office success of the Mister Rogers documentary Won't You Be My Neighbor? is any indication.

Knowing that today's adults still have a soft spot in their hearts for the PBS shows of their childhoods, the telecom sales agent CenturyLinkQuote.com used Google Trends to figure out what kind of impact different kids' series had on each state. They created the map above, showing the most talked-about PBS Kids show in every state over the last 14 years.

According to this data, the Midwest is all about Reading Rainbow, Sesame Street is big in New Jersey and Delaware, and Wishbone reigns in the Southwest. Mister Rogers, despite his status as a TV icon, only dominates in Pennsylvania. The short-lived Canadian-American show Zoboomafoo makes a surprisingly strong showing, coming in as the favorite in four different states despite only having two seasons.

Did your favorite make the list?

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