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Marcin Aleksander Surowiec
Marcin Aleksander Surowiec

11 Strange and Delightful Twin Peaks Tattoos

Marcin Aleksander Surowiec
Marcin Aleksander Surowiec

We recently posted an article about how Twin Peaks helped revolutionize television by making a soap opera into a modern art piece. While some people watched the show, appreciated it, and then moved on to the next trend in prime time, the show, like all David Lynch creations, developed a strong cult following. In fact, many people have tattoos featuring icons of the series. Here are a few we uncovered.

1. Who Killed Laura Palmer?

The first and foremost mystery in the series is who killed Laura Palmer, but I’m willing to bet you didn’t expect anyone to have tattoos of her corpse after it washed up on shore. But here’s one by tattoo artist Josh Carlton that recounts the scene in perfect detail.

2. It’s Not the Laura You Know

Here’s another take on Laura Palmer’s corpse, only this time with classic actress Vivian Leigh filling in for actress Sheryl Lee. Why someone wanted to combine the two isn’t clear, but it is obvious that artist Mez Love did a great job illustrating the concept.

3. Two Seasons, One Tattoo

This tattoo also includes a shot of Laura lying dead on the beach, only it seems less morbid since it also incorporates other images from the show. This impressively detailed leg tattoo by Attitude Tattoo isn’t even complete, it still is waiting for the dark red curtain from the Black Lodge and a few other details to be added in.

4. A Damn Fine Tattoo

Here’s another piece that incorporates a variety of icons from throughout the series in one great image. Artist Silje Hagland combined the décor of the Black Lodge with a “damn fine” cup of coffee, an owl that is not what it seems and a blue rose that symbolizes the unsolvable case.

5. So Much Lynch, So Little Space

This half sleeve by Mez Lovealso incorporates many of the iconic images from the show, including the Black Lodge, the blue rose, and some coffee and pie from the Double R Diner. But it adds in portraits of both Agent Cooper and Gordon Cole (the character Lynch played in the show).

6. Not What They Seem

Joshua Marhall likes the show enough that he’s getting an entire sleeve based on it. The first piece he had completed was one showing that the owls are not what they seem.

7. As Black As Midnight On A Moonless Night

Next, Joshua got some of the RR coffee on his arm with Agent Cooper’s preference for the beverage. His sleeve, by artist Scott Move of Circle Tattoo, isn’t yet complete, but we can’t wait to see how it ends up when it’s done.

8. Welcome to Twin Peaks

No two images better represent Twin Peaks than the town sign shown in the intro and Agent Cooper. This tattoo by Marcin Aleksander Surowiec combines the two into a unique image that seems particularly fitting for such a strange and surreal show.

9. This Must Be Where Pies Go When They Die

It’s hard not to love the Double R, given how much Agent Cooper raves about their coffee and pie. For that reason, a surprising number of people have tattoos featuring coffee or pie from the diner, including Kat Selvocki who was inked by Ashley Love.

10. This Owl Belongs In A Cave

One of the most famous icons from the show is the owls, so it is no surprise that there are so many Twin Peaks owl tattoos. This one, on Instagram user craigy_mac, is not only topped off with a quote about the owls, but also with the owl pictogram found in the Owl Cave.

11. Traditional Owl Surprises

Ryan’s owl tattoo by Ron Henry Wells is quite striking as he decided to get the Twin Peaks icon in a very traditional tattoo style, which flows well with the message about the owls not being what they seem.

If you still can’t get enough Twin Peaks weirdness, don’t miss these great coffee ads from Japan made by David Lynch himself.

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Gergely Dudás - Dudolf, Facebook
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fun
There’s a Ghost Hiding in This Illustration—Can You Find It?
Gergely Dudás - Dudolf, Facebook
Gergely Dudás - Dudolf, Facebook

A hidden image illustration by Gergely Dudás, a.k.a. Dudolf
Gergely Dudás - Dudolf, Facebook

Gergely Dudás is at it again. The Hungarian illustrator, who is known to his fans as “Dudolf,” has spent the past several years delighting the internet with his hidden image illustrations, going back to the time he hid a single panda bear in a sea of snowmen in 2015. In the years since, he has played optical tricks with a variety of other figures, including sheep and Santa Claus and hearts and snails. For his latest brainteaser, which he posted to both his Facebook page and his blog, Dudolf is asking fans to find a pet ghost named Sheet in a field of white bunny rabbits.

As we’ve learned from his past creations, what makes this hidden image difficult to find is that it looks so similar to the objects surrounding it that our brains just sort of group it in as being “the same.” So you’d better concentrate.

If you’ve scanned the landscape again and again and can’t find Sheet to save your life, go ahead and click here to see where he’s hiding.

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Design
Graphic Design Series Shows Which Fonts Your Favorite Logos Use

Unless you’re a dedicated design geek, you probably can’t recognize the fonts used in the logos of some of the most recognizable companies in the world—even if you see them every day. Enter graphic designer Emanuele Abrate, whose latest project, Logofonts, illuminates the favorite fonts of the brands you see every day.

As we spotted on Adweek, Logofonts takes a logo—like, for instance, Spotify’s—and replaces the company’s name with the font in which it's written. Some fonts, like Spotify’s Gotham, might be familiar, while others you may never have heard of. Nike’s and Red Bull’s Futura is so commonplace in signage in logos that it’s the subject of an entire book called Never Use Futura. (Other companies that use it include Absolut Vodka and Domino’s Pizza, and many more.) But you most likely aren’t familiar with Twitter’s Pico or Netflix’s Bebas Neue.

Abrate is a managing partner at grafigata, an Italian blog and online academy focused on graphic design. In his work as a freelance designer, he focuses on logo design and brand identities, so it wasn’t hard for him to track down exactly which fonts each brand uses.

“When I see a logo, I wonder how it was conceived, how it was designed, what kind of character was used and why,” Abrate tells Mental Floss. The Logofonts project came from “trying to understand which fonts they use or which fonts have been modified (or redesigned) to get to the final result.”

The Nike logo reads 'Futura.'

The Twitter logo reads 'Pico.'

The Red Bull Logo reads 'Futura BQ.'

The Netflix logo reads 'Bebas Neue.'

You can check out the rest of the Logofonts project and Abrate’s other work on his Behance or Facebook pages, and on his Instagram.

[h/t Adweek]

All images courtesy Emanuele Abrate

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