15 Old Things In Your House That Are Worth a Fortune

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Chances are, there's more money in our homes than we realize. There is a market for collectibles of any kind—even those dusty old toys and sickeningly retro Pyrex casserole dishes your grandmother used to warm up meatloaf in can bring in hundreds of dollars. But it's not so easy to distinguish trash from treasure. So to help you along, here are 15 old things in your house that could be worth a fortune.

1. DAVID BOWIE'S DIAMOND DOGS VINYL

Picture of David Bowie
NILS MEILVANG, AFP/Getty Images

For David Bowie's 1974 Diamond Dogs album on vinyl, its worth lies in the very strange story of the album artwork. The original image featured an illustration of Bowie with his bottom half replaced by a dog's—genitals and all. This made record label RCA nervous, so the image was altered before the record hit shelves. As you'd expect, some copies of the original got loose in the world, and in 2003, one sold for $3550. Who knows how many copies of the taboo album art made it off the printer before it was censored?

2. RETRO VIDEO GAMES

Person holding Super Nintendo controller
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There are plenty of ultra-rare and valuable Super Nintendo games that you simply won't see collecting dust in someone's basement—including the limited-run competition edition games and Japanese imports. But other titles like Super Mario RPG, Mega Man X3, Harvest Moon, and Chrono Trigger were big hits that are probably still in the closets of many casual consumers. X3 and Chrono Trigger, in particular, have been known to fetch $400 and close to $600 respectively.

There is a huge rare gaming market that isn't just limited to the SNES—every console has its fair share of pricey titles, from the Genesis to the PlayStation 4. One of the most infamous is Little Samson on the original Nintendo, which regularly ends up on places like eBay and can get bids over $1000. Though, with how rare the game is, it isn't as likely it's just lying around your basement.

3. ANYTHING POLLY POCKET

Polly Pocket toys
Herry Lawford, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

The Polly Pocket craze of the '90s gave birth to a line of inch-high toys that kids gobbled up. Now, as is the way of most things, they've found their way to eBay, where the line has been given a second life as a high-priced collector's item. Just one search will yield plenty of pricey results, such as a Peter Pan Polly Pocket set closing in on $300 and this collection of loose Polly Pocket houses for $250. These big-ticket items are from the pre-Mattel Polly Pocket days, so if you have a collection of the original Polly Pocket stuff, get organizing!

4. VINTAGE COMICS THAT INSPIRED TODAY'S MOVIES AND TV SHOWS

A stack of comic books
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Turn on the TV and what do you see? Superheroes on pretty much every channel (and in every theater). And if you own the early comic book adventures of these characters, you can be looking at a hefty profit. Right now, copies of the Black Panther series from the '70s—written and illustrated by co-creator Jack Kirby—are having a moment on eBay. The auction for the series' 15-issue run is already well over $150, and single issues are going for $50 alone.

The first comic book appearance of the villainous Killmonger, who also appears in the Black Panther movie, also shot up in worth and is now hovering around $100. That's nothing compared to Black Panther's own debut, which ranges from a few hundred to $1000 depending on the condition.

Prices go up when these characters are in the spotlight, so go through that old comic collection and do some research. If you have books starring a character that's about to become a movie star, get your eBay account ready. If they're vintage and in good condition, they could fetch a high price.

5. VINTAGE ADVERTISING SIGNS

Vintage Coca-Cola ad
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Before pop-up ads told us what to buy, a major way companies would advertise would be through tin signs hung up in bars, restaurants, and gas stations. And today, some of these signs can bring in a nice chunk of change, like this $225 eBay listing for Indian Motorcycles or this AAA Root Beer bottle sign that's sitting at over $300. Then there's the venerable Coke sign that is listed at over $600.

Beer signs are another surprising money-maker—vintage brands like Falstaff and Griesedieck often get bids in the $500 range, and older signs for common brands like Pabst and Old Milwaukee can go for four-figure amounts. Maybe a member of your family used to own or work at a bar and ended up with one of these signs that's just collected dust in a garage somewhere. Keep a look out—that aluminum soda sign could become your next car insurance payment.

6. BOY SCOUT MEMORABILIA

Boy Scout patches
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All those Boy Scout merit badges and medals you had growing up could net an unlikely sum of money today. Boy Scout memorabilia has been known to get plenty of interest online, with one auction of old paraphernalia going for $240. And one look on eBay shows plenty of listings, with many batches of patches and badges getting bids of over $100.

7. POKÉMON CARDS

Pokemon cards
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Remember all those Pokémon cards that you probably folded up, stuck in your pocket, or traded away to friends when you were younger? Well complete sets of the standard cards can go for hundreds of dollars on eBay. And single, ultra-rare cards can be well into the thousands—like the holograph Charizard that sold for $11,999. Of course they have to be graded and examined by experts to catch that price, but even a stack of the run-of-the-mill cards in mint condition can fetch a few bucks.

8. KANSAS QUARTERS

Kansas quarters
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When the "T" on a coin pressing machine got a smudge on it, a batch of Kansas state quarters had its motto accidentally altered from “In God We Trust” to the far more thought-provoking "In God We Rust." The error didn't last long, but the irregular coins made it out into the world and are now valued at around $100 each. So check those jars of coins you have sitting around; you might have a very valuable printing error on your hands.

9. CHINA SETS

Fine China
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Chances are someone in your family has a china set stacked in a cabinet, waiting for that fancy dinner party that never comes. If you're looking to offload it and make a little money, do your research. China can have a lot of value on sites like eBay and EBTH, and you want to make sure you maximize its worth. If you think it's a nice enough set, bring it to an antique dealer and see—at the very least, you can get a ballpark estimate of its value. Some go for hundreds, if not thousands, online.

10. THE ORIGINAL KENNER STAR WARS FIGURES

The Millennium Falcon toy
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When the original Star Wars movie hit theaters, there was one massive oversight: There were no toys ready for the premiere. No one thought the movie would become the sensation that it has, so Kenner had to rush to get a proper toy line out the year after the movie's release. But when those toys finally hit, it was seismic.

Star Wars toys flew off shelves, and they've become incredible collectors' items today, especially the ones from the '70s and '80s. A 1978 Luke Skywalker toy—the one with the double-telescoping lightsaber—sold at auction for $25,000. And that's not even close to all. There are vintage Boba Fetts going for around $2500 and obscure, pre-Hayden Christensen Anakin Skywalkers going for up to $3000.

Then, of course, there are the vehicles and spaceships, like the original Millennium Falcon, which can net $3000 if it's still in the box. Countless kids had these toys somewhere in the '70s and '80s, and there's a chance you've got a few in your family.

11. VINTAGE LUNCHBOXES

Snoopy lunch box
Caren Pilgrim, Flickr // CC BY-ND 2.0

Lunchboxes have made their way to becoming one of the most cherished collectors' items around. Cartoon characters, superheroes, and rock groups have all been slapped on the side of a tin box for kids to put their PB&J sandwiches in. And now they can be worth well over $100.

This Bonanza lunchbox sold for $130, while The Beatles, even in poor condition, could command around $400. That's just the start. The Munsters, Superman, Lost in Space—they're all going for well over $100, and in some cases will end up over $200. Then there are the surprises like The Wild, Wild West getting bids for $225, while Disney's Davy Crockett is nearing $230. If you have one that you feel can be valuable, do a little research and see what similar ones are going for online.

12. PYREX

A stack of Pyrex bowls
Jessica Fiess-Hill, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

Don't waste your time wondering why, just know this: People love vintage Pyrex. Need proof? There’s a butter dish going for $225 on eBay. There are other listings, too. Bowl sets are going for more than $300 and a chip and dip set is closing in on $100. Turns out there could be a little green in grandma's old casserole dish.

13. AMERICAN GIRL DOLLS

Girl holding American Girl doll
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Those original American Girl dolls from 1986 are a popular collector's item now, with Samantha selling as high as $4200 on eBay. Of course that included her outfits and accessories, but other dolls have been known to go for more than $2800. Even dolls out of their original packaging can get a listing for hundreds of dollars, which is a nice little profit from their original price.

14. OLD TYPEWRITERS

Picture of an orange typewriter
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That old, forgotten typewriter in your garage might be worthless to you, but for those who like the soothing clickety-clack of the keys, it could hold real value. On eBay, some typewriters in good condition are going for nearly $200, with this unique orange one getting bids for more than $250. Some of the older antique models can go even higher, with current bids coming in at anywhere from $475 to $560.

The world of typewriters is complex, with so many different manufacturers and models hitting the market in the 20th century. Remember, though, people won't spend big on something like a typewriter simply because it's old. See if it's in good shape and test it out—if it's fashionable and functional, you might get some real interest in it.

15. VINTAGE HE-MAN, G.I. JOE, AND TRANSFORMERS TOYS

Picture of a He-Man toy
Semihundido, Flickr // CC BY-SA 2.0

He-Man, Transformer, and G.I. Joe toys were the "Big Three" for many kids growing up in the '80s, and today, these figures can fetch a fair price even if they've been removed from the box. Just a short trip through eBay will show countless loose toys going for a good amount of money.

This He-Man, complete with accessories, doesn't need a box to get a listing for over $50. Add Skeletor and a couple of comics to the mix and you're suddenly close to $250. And you’re looking at around $100 for a mail-in Cobra Commander action figure.

With action figures, boxes are always better, as listings for more than $200 for Transformers Jetfire and a $300+ Optimus Prime show. And if you have a vehicle in a box, even better. This Dreadnok Thunder Machine from G.I. Joe is currently at $495. But if you want to talk about "Holy Grails," then you have to mention the Masters of the Universe Eternia playset, which is rare enough to exist on eBay in the box for $9999. Even parts of the playset get bids of over $100. You might want to double-check your old toy collection for that one—a few misplaced parts could be another collector's treasure.

12 Festive Facts About A Christmas Story

Warner Home Video
Warner Home Video

Which Oscar-winning star wanted to play Ralphie Parker's dad? Which actor went on to have a seedy career in the adult film industry? Can you really get your tongue stuck to a metal pole? On the 35th anniversary of A Christmas Story's debut, here are a few tidbits about the holiday classic to tide you over until TNT's 24-hour Christmas marathon.

1. JACK NICHOLSON WAS INTERESTED IN PLAYING RALPHIE'S DAD.

Though Jack Nicholson was reportedly offered the role of The Old Man Parker, and interested, casting—and paying—him would have meant doubling the budget. But director Bob Clark, who didn't know Nicholson was interested, said Darren McGavin was the perfect choice for the role.

2. IT OWES A DEBT TO PORKY'S.

What does Porky's—a raunchy 1980s teen sex comedy—have to do with a wholesome film like A Christmas Story? Bob Clark directed both: Porky's in 1982 and A Christmas Story in 1983. If Porky's hadn't given him the professional and financial success he needed, he wouldn't have been able to bring A Christmas Story to the big screen.

3. RALPHIE SAYS HE WANTS A RED RYDER BB GUN A LOT.

For anyone keeping count, Ralphie says he wants the Red Ryder BB Gun 28 times throughout the course of the movie. That's approximately once every three minutes and 20 seconds.

4. THESE DAYS, PETER BILLINGSLEY SPENDS HIS TIME BEHIND THE CAMERA.

Peter Billingsley, a.k.a. Ralphie, has been good friends with Vince Vaughn since they both appeared in a CBS Schoolbreak Special together in the early 1990s. He doesn't do much acting these days, though he has popped up in cameos (including one in Elf, another holiday classic). Instead, Billingsley prefers to spend his time behind the camera as a director and producer. He has done a lot of work with Vaughn and Jon Favreau, including serving as an executive producer on Iron Man (in which he also made a cameo).

5. YES, YOU CAN GET YOUR TONGUE STUCK ON A PIECE OF COLD METAL.

Mythbusters tested whether it was possible to get your tongue truly stuck on a piece of cold metal. Guess what? It is. So don't triple dog dare your best friend to try it.

6. ONE OF THE YOUNG ACTORS MOVED ON TO A CAREER IN ADULT FILMS.

Scott Schwartz, who played Flick (the kid who stuck his tongue to the frozen flagpole), spent several years working in the adult film industry. In 2000, he turned his attention back to mainstream films. His most recent role was as "Disco City Hot Dog Vendor" in the 2017 TV movie Vape Warz.

7. RALPHIE'S HOUSE IS NOW A MUSEUM.

Next time you're in Cleveland, you can visit the original house from the movie. It was sold on eBay in 2004 for $150,000. Collector Brian Jones bought the house and restored it to its movie glory and stocked it up with some of the original props from the film, including Randy's snowsuit.

8. THE IDEA FOR THE FILM CAME TO BOB CLARK WHILE HE WAS DRIVING TO PICK UP A DATE.

Peter Billingsley, Melinda Dillon, Darren McGavin, and Ian Petrella in A Christmas Story (1983)
Warner Home Video

Director Bob Clark got the idea for the movie when he was driving to pick up a date. He heard Jean Shepherd on the radio doing a reading of his short story collection, In God We Trust, All Others Pay Cash, which included some bits that eventually ended up in A Christmas Story. Clark said he drove around the block for an hour until the program ended (which his date was not too happy about).

9. IT PARTLY INSPIRED THE WONDER YEARS.

The Wonder Years was inspired in part by A Christmas Story. In fact, toward the very end of the series, Peter Billingsley even played one of Kevin Arnold's roommates.

10. YOU CAN STILL BUY A RED RYDER BB GUN.

The real Red Ryder BB Gun was first made in 1938 and was named after a comic strip cowboy. You can still buy it today for the low, low price of $39.99. But the original wasn't quite the same as the one in the movie; it lacked the compass and sundial that both the Jean Shepherd story and the movie call for. Special versions had to be made just for A Christmas Story.

11. THE LEG LAMP CAN ALSO BE YOURS.

Peter Billingsley and Melinda Dillon in A Christmas Story (1983)
Warner Home Video

While we're talking shopping: you know you want the leg lamp. Put it in your window! Be the envy of your neighbors! It's a Major Award! You can buy it on Amazon (there's a 40-inch version, as well as a 20-inch replica). If you're not feeling quite so flamboyant, they also make a nightlight version.

12. IT SPAWNED A TRIO OF SEQUELS.

A Christmas Story led to two little-talked-about sequels. The first one was a 1988 made-for-TV movie, Ollie Hopnoodle's Haven of Bliss. Jerry O'Connell played 14-year-old Ralphie, who is excited about his first job—as a furniture mover. Of course, it ends up being awful, and it might make him miss the annual family vacation at Mr. Hopnoodle's lakeside cabins.

My Summer Story, a.k.a. It Runs in the Family, debuted on the big screen in 1994. Kieran Culkin plays Ralphie, Mary Steenburgen is his mom, and Charles Grodin is his dad.

And in 2012, the direct-to-video sequel A Christmas Story 2 picked up five years after the original movie left off, with Ralphie attempting to get his parents to buy him a car.

An earlier version of this story appeared in 2008.

10 Timeless Facts About The Land Before Time

Universal Pictures Home Entertainment
Universal Pictures Home Entertainment

Five years before Jurassic Park roared into theaters, a gentler, more meditative dinosaur film endeared itself to audiences of all ages. Initially met with mixed reviews, The Land Before Time is now regarded as an animated classic. Here are 10 things you might not have known about the Steven Spielberg-produced film, which arrived in theaters 30 years ago.

1. IT WAS CONCEIVED AS A DIALOGUE-FREE MOVIE.

Gabriel Damon and Candace Hutson in The Land Before Time (1988)
Universal Pictures Home Entertainment

In the mid-1980s, executive producer Steven Spielberg began toying with the idea of a Bambi-esque dinosaur film. “Basically,” he later said, “I wanted to do a soft picture … about five little dinosaurs and how they grow up and work together as a group.” Inspiration came from the “Rite of Spring” sequence from Disney’s Fantasia (1940)—a scene in which prehistoric beasts wordlessly go about their business. At first, Spielberg wanted his own dinosaur characters to follow suit and remain mum. Ultimately, however, it was feared that a non-verbal approach might bore or confuse the film’s intended audience. As such, the animals were given lines.

2. DIRECTOR DON BLUTH WAS AN EX-DISNEY EMPLOYEE.

Don Bluth grew up idolizing Disney’s work, and began working for the studio in 1955. Over the next two decades, he did various odd jobs until he was brought on as a full-time animator in 1971. Once on the inside, Bluth got to peek behind the magician’s curtain—and disliked what he found there. “I think [Walt Disney] would’ve seen that the pictures were losing their luster,” Bluth said. Frustrated by the studio’s cost-cutting measures, he resigned in 1979. Joining him were fellow animators Gary Goldman and John Pomeroy. Together the trio launched their own company, Sullivan Bluth Studios, and began working on The Land Before Time in 1986.

3. OVER 600 BACKGROUND PAINTINGS WERE MADE FOR THE FILM.

Most of these depicted beautiful but barren wastelands, which presented a real challenge for the creative team. As one studio press release put it, “The artists had to create a believable environment in which there was almost no foliage.” Whenever possible, Bluth’s illustrators emphasized vibrant colors. This kept their backdrops from looking too drab or monotonous—despite the desolate setting.

4. LITTLEFOOT’S ORIGINAL NAME WAS “THUNDERFOOT.”

This was changed when the filmmakers learned that there was a triceratops in a popular children’s book called Thunderfoot. Speaking of three-horned dinosaurs: Cera evolved from a pugnacious male character called Bambo.

5. THE FILMMAKERS HAD TO CUT ABOUT 10 MINUTES OF FOOTAGE.

“We compromised a lot with The Land Before Time,” Goldman admitted. Nowhere was this fact more apparent than on the cutting room floor. Spielberg and his fellow executive producer George Lucas deemed 19 individual scenes “too scary.” “We’ll have kids crying in the lobby, and angry parents,” Spielberg warned. “You don’t want that.”

6. “ROOTER” WAS INTRODUCED AT THE URGING OF CHILD PSYCHOLOGISTS.

In Bambi, the title character’s mom dies off-screen. The same cannot be said for Littlefoot’s mother, whose slow demise goes on for several agonizing minutes. Naturally, there was some concern about how children would react to this. “A lot of research went into the mother dying sequence,” Pomeroy said. “Psychologists were approached and shown the film. They gave their professional opinions of how the sequence could be depicted.” Thus, Rooter was born.

One scene after Littlefoot’s mom passes, the wise reptile consoles him, saying “You’ll always miss her, but she’ll always be with you as long as you remember the things she taught you.” Sharp-eared fans might recognize Rooter’s voice as that of Pat Hingle, who also narrates the movie.

7. JAMES HORNER DID THE SOUNDTRACK.

The late, Oscar-winning composer behind Braveheart (1995), Titanic (1997), and Avatar (2009) put together a soaring score. Along with lyricist Will Jennings, he also penned the original song “If We Hold On Together,” which Diana Ross sings as the end credits roll.

8. THE ACTRESS BEHIND DUCKY PASSED AWAY BEFORE THE MOVIE’S RELEASE.

Judith Barsi’s career was off to a great start. By age 10, this daughter of Hungarian immigrants had already appeared in 70 commercials and voiced the leading lady in Don Bluth’s All Dogs Go to Heaven (1989). For The Land Before Time, Barsi voiced the ever-optimistic Ducky, which was reportedly her favorite role. Then tragedy struck: In July of 1988, Barsi’s father József murdered both her and her mother before taking his own life.

9. IT HAD A RECORD-SETTING OPENING WEEKEND.

From the get-go, The Land Before Time had some stiff competition. Universal released it on November 18, 1988—the same day that Disney’s Oliver & Company hit theaters. Yet, for a solid month, Bluth gave Oliver a box office beating. The Land Before Time enjoyed the highest-grossing opening weekend that any animated film had ever seen, pulling in $7.5 million to Oliver & Company’s $4 million. Since then, of course, The Land Before Time has long been dethroned; today, Incredibles 2 (2018) holds this coveted distinction with a $182.7 million first-weekend showing.

10. THERE ONCE WAS TALK OF A LAND BEFORE TIME STAGE MUSICAL.

“The time has come for dinosaurs on Broadway,” the late theatrical producer Irving Welzer told The New York Times in 1997. Emboldened by the recent cinematic success of Spielberg’s The Lost World: Jurassic Park (1996), Welzer expressed an interest helping Littlefoot, Cera, Ducky, and the rest of the gang make their Big Apple debut. Soon, however, the idea faded.

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