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Crummy Gummy

16 Artworks Made From Sweet, Sweet Gummy Bears

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Crummy Gummy

You might be surprised by how many artists choose to work with gummy bears. Here’s a small sample of the many creations artistically crafted from these sweet snacks.

1. Fit for a Candy Palace

While artist Yaya Chou doesn’t exclusively work with gummy bears, she is the most famous person in the gummy art world. Perhaps her most best-known gummy work is this lovely, and quite fancy, chandelier that I would be quite happy to hang in my home.

2. The Gummy Bear Necessities

Here’s another of Yaya’s most popular pieces, a bear rug made out of gummy bears. If gummies weren’t made with gelatin, I’m willing to bet PETA would be in full support of switching out all real bear rugs with this candy equivalent.

3. Sweet, Sweet Skin

If you prefer your gummy skin rugs to be built with only gummy parts, then perhaps you’d prefer this one by artist Brock Davis.

4. Sail Away, Sail Away

Artist Jenice Johnson has a knack for capturing gummy bears in their native environment. In fact, here’s one setting sail for new adventures. Let’s hope he stays safe—after all, loose lips eat ships. You can buy prints of all of Johnson’s delightful gummy images on her Gummy World website.

5. The Gummy Bear Company Picnic

You may have heard of a teddy bear picnic, but have you ever heard of a gummy bear sack race? Only Jenice Johnson has been lucky enough to catch one of these rare events in person and as you can see, they really are a riveting experience.

6. Chewy Classics

For those who prefer more classical art forms, artist Johannes Cordes creates entire full-sized portraits from sweet gummy goodness. He not only recreates paintings by famous artists such as da Vinci and Warhol, but also makes his own creations from the snacks. In fact, he goes through over three tons of gummies in a year.

7. You Wear What You Eat

Wish you could just wrap yourself up with delicious gummy goodness? Then you might want to hire stylists Hissa Igarashi and Sayuri Marakumi to build you a custom gown like this one, inspired by a real dress by designer Alexander McQueen.

8. Born This Delicious

I admit, I always thought Lady Gaga’s meat dress was kind of stupid, but now that I’ve seen the gummy version, I think it really does make an interesting statement. OK, not really, but I do love this Gummy Gaga by Florida artist Crummy Gummy.

9. Ethics-Free Medical Experiments

Being a mad scientist seems like it would be kind of fun if it weren’t for all those terrible, nagging ethical issues. Fortunately, Instructables user Fungus Amongus has a way for anyone to perform brain transplants, heart surgeries, and more without the guilt of creating a mutant creature—just use gummies instead!

10. The Science of Delicious

This periodic table by Kevin Van Aelst may not be scientifically useful, but it has all the elements of a tasty snack.

11. The Bears of Death

What could you do with a hot glue gun and some gummy bears? Chances are couldn't do anything as impressively elaborate as Emily Souleret, a sculpture student at the University of Richmond, who made this impressive skull with nothing but those two components.

12. Oh the Bear-manity

Why should you eat gummy bears? Because left on their own, they are a brutal, horrible culture that practices ritual sacrifice on their own just for the heck of it. DeviantArt user hal9002 has the proof.

13. Silent Candy

Are scary video games like Silent Hill too spine-tingling for your taste? Well maybe you should try modding them so all the characters are gummy bears. After all, DeviantArt user KaiKudo’s gummy Pyramid Head is drastically less scary than the one you see in the game.

14. Gummy Wars

Ever wonder how the Star Wars franchise would play out if reenacted by gummy bears? While I can’t tell you how the whole series would work in candy form, thanks to Tracy Sloan, I can at least show you what Darth Maul’s death scene would look like.

15. This Tender Moment

There are so many pictures of gummy bear murders online that it’s just so refreshing to finally see some happy gummies sharing a precious moment together. Special thanks to Pinar Adar for showing just how touching gummy love can be.

16. Hot Gummy on Gummy Action

Normally a kama sutra picture would require a NSFW warning, but a gummy sutra picture is only NSFD—Not Safe For Dieters. Matt Duke created this masterpiece to help celebrate Valentine’s Day back in 2007.

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Never Buy Drawing Paper Again With This Endlessly Reusable Art Notebook
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Art supplies can get pricey when you’re letting your kid’s creativity run wild. But with an endlessly reusable notebook, you never have to worry about running out of paper during that after-school coloring session.

The creators of the erasable Rocketbook Wave have come out with a new version of their signature product meant especially for color drawings. The connected Rocketbook Color notebook allows you to send images drawn on its pages to Google Drive or other cloud services with your phone, then erase the pages by sticking the whole notebook in the microwave. You get a digital copy of your work (one that, with more vibrant colors, might look even better than the original) and get to go on drawing almost immediately after you fill the book.

An animated view of a notebook’s pages changing between different drawings.

There’s no special equipment involved beyond the notebook itself. The Rocketbook Color works with Crayola and other brands’ washable crayons and colored pencils, plus dry-erase markers. The pages are designed to be smudge-proof, so turning the page won’t ruin the art on the other side even if you are using dry-erase markers.

Rocketbook’s marketing is aimed at kids, but adults like to save paper, too. Break away from the adult coloring books and go free-form. If it doesn’t quite work out, you can just erase it forever.

The notebooks are $20 each on Kickstarter.

All images courtesy Rocketbook

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This Amazing Clock Has a Different Hand for Every Minute of the Day
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In the video below, you can watch Japanese ad agency Dentsu transform passing time into art. According to Adweek, the project was commissioned by Japanese stationery brand Hitotoki, which produces crafting materials. To celebrate the value of handmade items in an increasingly fast-paced world, Dentsu created a film advertisement for their client depicting their goods as a stop-motion clock.

The timepiece ticks off all 1440 minutes in the day, and was assembled in real-time against a colored backdrop during a single 24-hour take. Its "hands" were crafted from different combinations of some 30,000 disparate small items, including confetti, cream puffs, tiny toys, silk leaves, and sunglasses.

"In a world where everything is so hectic and efficient, we wanted to bring the value of 'handmade' to life," explains Dentsu art director Ryosuke Miyashita in a press statement quoted by Stash Media. "We created different combinations of small Hitotoki brand items to express each and every minute."

You can check out a promotional video for the project below, which details the arduous crafting process, or view a real-time version of the clock here.

[h/t Adweek]

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