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Crummy Gummy

16 Artworks Made From Sweet, Sweet Gummy Bears

Crummy Gummy
Crummy Gummy

You might be surprised by how many artists choose to work with gummy bears. Here’s a small sample of the many creations artistically crafted from these sweet snacks.

1. Fit for a Candy Palace

While artist Yaya Chou doesn’t exclusively work with gummy bears, she is the most famous person in the gummy art world. Perhaps her most best-known gummy work is this lovely, and quite fancy, chandelier that I would be quite happy to hang in my home.

2. The Gummy Bear Necessities

Here’s another of Yaya’s most popular pieces, a bear rug made out of gummy bears. If gummies weren’t made with gelatin, I’m willing to bet PETA would be in full support of switching out all real bear rugs with this candy equivalent.

3. Sweet, Sweet Skin

If you prefer your gummy skin rugs to be built with only gummy parts, then perhaps you’d prefer this one by artist Brock Davis.

4. Sail Away, Sail Away

Artist Jenice Johnson has a knack for capturing gummy bears in their native environment. In fact, here’s one setting sail for new adventures. Let’s hope he stays safe—after all, loose lips eat ships. You can buy prints of all of Johnson’s delightful gummy images on her Gummy World website.

5. The Gummy Bear Company Picnic

You may have heard of a teddy bear picnic, but have you ever heard of a gummy bear sack race? Only Jenice Johnson has been lucky enough to catch one of these rare events in person and as you can see, they really are a riveting experience.

6. Chewy Classics

For those who prefer more classical art forms, artist Johannes Cordes creates entire full-sized portraits from sweet gummy goodness. He not only recreates paintings by famous artists such as da Vinci and Warhol, but also makes his own creations from the snacks. In fact, he goes through over three tons of gummies in a year.

7. You Wear What You Eat

Wish you could just wrap yourself up with delicious gummy goodness? Then you might want to hire stylists Hissa Igarashi and Sayuri Marakumi to build you a custom gown like this one, inspired by a real dress by designer Alexander McQueen.

8. Born This Delicious

I admit, I always thought Lady Gaga’s meat dress was kind of stupid, but now that I’ve seen the gummy version, I think it really does make an interesting statement. OK, not really, but I do love this Gummy Gaga by Florida artist Crummy Gummy.

9. Ethics-Free Medical Experiments

Being a mad scientist seems like it would be kind of fun if it weren’t for all those terrible, nagging ethical issues. Fortunately, Instructables user Fungus Amongus has a way for anyone to perform brain transplants, heart surgeries, and more without the guilt of creating a mutant creature—just use gummies instead!

10. The Science of Delicious

This periodic table by Kevin Van Aelst may not be scientifically useful, but it has all the elements of a tasty snack.

11. The Bears of Death

What could you do with a hot glue gun and some gummy bears? Chances are couldn't do anything as impressively elaborate as Emily Souleret, a sculpture student at the University of Richmond, who made this impressive skull with nothing but those two components.

12. Oh the Bear-manity

Why should you eat gummy bears? Because left on their own, they are a brutal, horrible culture that practices ritual sacrifice on their own just for the heck of it. DeviantArt user hal9002 has the proof.

13. Silent Candy

Are scary video games like Silent Hill too spine-tingling for your taste? Well maybe you should try modding them so all the characters are gummy bears. After all, DeviantArt user KaiKudo’s gummy Pyramid Head is drastically less scary than the one you see in the game.

14. Gummy Wars

Ever wonder how the Star Wars franchise would play out if reenacted by gummy bears? While I can’t tell you how the whole series would work in candy form, thanks to Tracy Sloan, I can at least show you what Darth Maul’s death scene would look like.

15. This Tender Moment

There are so many pictures of gummy bear murders online that it’s just so refreshing to finally see some happy gummies sharing a precious moment together. Special thanks to Pinar Adar for showing just how touching gummy love can be.

16. Hot Gummy on Gummy Action

Normally a kama sutra picture would require a NSFW warning, but a gummy sutra picture is only NSFD—Not Safe For Dieters. Matt Duke created this masterpiece to help celebrate Valentine’s Day back in 2007.

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Claudio Giovannini/AFP/Getty Images
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A Secret Room Full of Michelangelo's Sketches Will Soon Open in Florence
Claudio Giovannini/AFP/Getty Images
Claudio Giovannini/AFP/Getty Images

Parents all over the world have chastised their children for drawing on the walls. But when you're Michelangelo, you've got some leeway. According to The Local, the Medici Chapels, part of the Bargello museum in Florence, Italy, has announced that it plans to open a largely unseen room full of the artist's sketches to the public by 2020.

Roughly 40 years ago, curators of the chapels at the Basilica di San Lorenzo had a very Dan Brown moment when they discovered a trap door in a wardrobe leading to an underground room that appeared to have works from Michelangelo covering its walls. The tiny retreat is thought to be a place where the artist hid out in 1530 after upsetting the Medicis—his patrons—by joining a revolt against their control of Florence. While in self-imposed exile for several months, he apparently spent his time drawing on whatever surfaces were available.

A drawing by Michelangelo under the Medici Chapels in Florence
Claudio Giovannini/AFP/Getty Images

Museum officials previously believed the room and the charcoal drawings were too fragile to risk visitors, but have since had a change of heart, leading to their plan to renovate the building and create new attractions. While not all of the work is thought to be attributable to the famed artist, there's enough of it in the subterranean chamber—including drawings of Jesus and even recreations of portions of the Sistine Chapel—to make a trip worthwhile.

[h/t The Local]

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15 Things You Should Know About Georgia O’Keeffe

Georgia O’Keeffe’s enchanting floral still lifes are now a deeply ingrained part of American culture—so much so that they often eclipse her other colorful accomplishments. For a more complete portrait of the artist, who was born 130 years ago today, brush up on these 15 little-known facts about her.

1. FLOWER PAINTINGS MAKE UP A SMALL PERCENTAGE OF O'KEEFFE'S BODY OF WORK.

Though O'Keeffe is most famous for her lovingly rendered close-ups of flowers—like Black Iris and Oriental Poppies—these make up just about 200 of her 2000-plus paintings. The rest primarily depict landscapes, leaves, rocks, shells, and bones.

2. SHE REJECTED SEXUAL INTERPRETATIONS OF HER PAINTINGS.

For decades, critics assumed that O'Keeffe's flowers were intended as homages—or at the very least, allusions—to the female form. But in 1943, she insisted that they had it all wrong, saying, “Well—I made you take time to look at what I saw and when you took time to really notice my flowers you hung all your own associations with flowers on my flower and you write about my flower as if I think and see what you think and see of the flower—and I don’t.” So there.

3. SHE WAS NOT A NATIVE OF THE AMERICAN SOUTHWEST.


Joe Raedle/Getty Images

O'Keeffe was actually born on a Wisconsin dairy farm. She'd go on to live in Chicago; New York City; New York’s Lake George; Charlottesville, Virginia; and Amarillo, Texas. She first visited New Mexico in 1917, and as she grew older, her trips there became more and more frequent. Following the death of her husband in 1946, she moved to New Mexico permanently.

4. HER FAVORITE STUDIO WAS THE BACKSEAT OF A MODEL-A FORD.

In an interview with C-SPAN, Carolyn Kastner, curator of the Georgia O'Keeffe Museum, explained how the artist customized her car for this use: "She would remove the driver's seat. Then she would unbolt the passenger car, turn it around to face the back seat. Then she would lay the canvas on the back seat as an easel and paint inside her Model-A Ford."

Painting inside the car allowed O'Keeffe to stay out of the unrelenting desert sun, where she painted many of her later works. The Model-A also provided a barrier from the bees that would gather as the day wore on.

5. O'KEEFFE ALSO PAINTED SKYSCRAPERS.

While nature was her main source of inspiration, the time she spent in 1920s Manhattan spurred the creation of surreal efforts like New York With Moon, City Night and The Shelton with Sunspots.

6. O'KEEFFE IMMERSED HERSELF IN NATURE ...

While in New Mexico O’Keeffe spent summers and falls at her Ghost Ranch, putting up with the region's hottest, most stifling days in order to capture its most vivid colors. (The rest of the year she stayed at her second home, located in the small town of Abiquiu.) When she wasn't painting in her Model-A, O'Keeffe often camped out in the harsh surrounding terrain, to keep close to the landscapes that inspired her.

7. …WHATEVER THE WEATHER.

The artist would rig up tents from tarps, contend with unrelenting downpours, and paint with gloves on when it got too cold. She went camping well into her 70s and enjoyed a well-documented rafting trip with photographer Todd Webb at age 74. Her camping equipment is occasionally exhibited at the Georgia O'Keeffe Museum in Santa Fe.

8. SHE MARRIED THE MAN BEHIND HER FIRST GALLERY SHOW.

"At last, a woman on paper!" That’s what modernist photographer and gallery owner Alfred Stieglitz cried when he first saw O'Keeffe's abstract charcoal drawings. He was so enthusiastic about this series of sketches that he put them on display—before consulting their creator.

When O'Keeffe arrived at his gallery, she wasn't pleased, and brusquely introduced herself: "I am Georgia O'Keeffe and you will have to take these pictures down." Despite their rocky beginnings, Stieglitz and O'Keeffe quickly made amends, and went on to become partners in art and in life.

9. O'KEEFFE AND STIEGLITZ WROTE 25,000 PAGES OF LOVE LETTERS TO EACH OTHER.

When the pair met in 1916, he was famous and married; she was unknown and 23 years his junior. All the same, they began writing to each other often (sometimes two or three times a day) and at length (as many as 40 pages at a time). These preserved writings chart the progression of their romance—from flirtation to affair to their marriage in 1924—and even document their marital struggles.

10. SHE SERVED AS A MUSE TO OTHER ARTISTS.

Thanks in part to Stieglitz, O'Keeffe was one of the most photographed women of the 20th century. Stieglitz made O'Keeffe the subject of a long-term series of portraits meant to capture individuals as they aged, and she made for a striking model. Though he died in 1946, the project lived on as other photographers sought out O'Keeffe in order to capture the beloved artist against the harsh New Mexican landscapes she loved so dearly.

O'Keeffe later wrote:

When I look over the photographs Stieglitz took of me—some of them more than sixty years ago—I wonder who that person is. It is as if in my one life I have lived many lives. If the person in the photographs were living in this world today, she would be quite a different person—but it doesn't matter—Stieglitz photographed her then.

11. SHE QUIT PAINTING THREE TIMES.

The first break spanned several years (the exact number is a matter of debate), when O'Keeffe took on more stable jobs to help her family through financial troubles. In the early 1930s, a nervous breakdown led to her hospitalization, and caused her to set aside her brushes for more than a year.

In the years leading up to her death in 1986, failing eyesight forced O'Keeffe to give up painting entirely. Until then, she fought hard to keep working, enlisting assistants to prepare her canvas and mix her oil paints for pieces like 1977's Sky Above Clouds/Yellow Horizon and Clouds. She managed to use watercolors until she was 95.

12. AFTER GOING BLIND, SHE TURNED TO SCULPTING.


By Alfred Stieglitz - Phillips, Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

Although her vision eventually made painting impossible, O'Keeffe's desire to create was not squelched. She memorably declared, "I can see what I want to paint. The thing that makes you want to create is still there.” O'Keeffe began experimenting with clay sculpting in her late 80s, and continued with it into her 96th year.

13. SHE'S THE MOTHER OF AMERICAN MODERNISM.

Searching for what she called “the Great American Thing,” O'Keeffe was part of the Stieglitz Circle, which included such lauded early modernists as Charles Demuth, Arthur Dove, Marsden Hartley, John Marin, Paul Strand, and Edward Steichen. By the mid-1920s, she had become the first female painter to gain acclaim alongside her male contemporaries in New York's cutthroat art world. Her distinctive way of rendering nature in shapes and forms that made them seem simultaneously familiar and new earned her a reputation as a pioneer of the form.

14. SHE BLAZED NEW TRAILS FOR FEMALE ARTISTS.

In 1946, O’Keeffe became the first woman to earn a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art. Twenty-four years later, a Whitney Museum of American Art retrospective exhibit introduced her work to a new generation. Fifteen years after that, O'Keeffe was included in the inaugural slate of artists chosen to receive the newly founded National Medal of Arts for her contribution to American culture.

15. SHE WASN'T FEARLESS, BUT SHE REJECTED FEAR.

O'Keeffe was purported to have said, "I've been absolutely terrified every moment of my life and I've never let it keep me from doing a single thing I wanted to do."

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