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Crummy Gummy

16 Artworks Made From Sweet, Sweet Gummy Bears

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Crummy Gummy

You might be surprised by how many artists choose to work with gummy bears. Here’s a small sample of the many creations artistically crafted from these sweet snacks.

1. Fit for a Candy Palace

While artist Yaya Chou doesn’t exclusively work with gummy bears, she is the most famous person in the gummy art world. Perhaps her most best-known gummy work is this lovely, and quite fancy, chandelier that I would be quite happy to hang in my home.

2. The Gummy Bear Necessities

Here’s another of Yaya’s most popular pieces, a bear rug made out of gummy bears. If gummies weren’t made with gelatin, I’m willing to bet PETA would be in full support of switching out all real bear rugs with this candy equivalent.

3. Sweet, Sweet Skin

If you prefer your gummy skin rugs to be built with only gummy parts, then perhaps you’d prefer this one by artist Brock Davis.

4. Sail Away, Sail Away

Artist Jenice Johnson has a knack for capturing gummy bears in their native environment. In fact, here’s one setting sail for new adventures. Let’s hope he stays safe—after all, loose lips eat ships. You can buy prints of all of Johnson’s delightful gummy images on her Gummy World website.

5. The Gummy Bear Company Picnic

You may have heard of a teddy bear picnic, but have you ever heard of a gummy bear sack race? Only Jenice Johnson has been lucky enough to catch one of these rare events in person and as you can see, they really are a riveting experience.

6. Chewy Classics

For those who prefer more classical art forms, artist Johannes Cordes creates entire full-sized portraits from sweet gummy goodness. He not only recreates paintings by famous artists such as da Vinci and Warhol, but also makes his own creations from the snacks. In fact, he goes through over three tons of gummies in a year.

7. You Wear What You Eat

Wish you could just wrap yourself up with delicious gummy goodness? Then you might want to hire stylists Hissa Igarashi and Sayuri Marakumi to build you a custom gown like this one, inspired by a real dress by designer Alexander McQueen.

8. Born This Delicious

I admit, I always thought Lady Gaga’s meat dress was kind of stupid, but now that I’ve seen the gummy version, I think it really does make an interesting statement. OK, not really, but I do love this Gummy Gaga by Florida artist Crummy Gummy.

9. Ethics-Free Medical Experiments

Being a mad scientist seems like it would be kind of fun if it weren’t for all those terrible, nagging ethical issues. Fortunately, Instructables user Fungus Amongus has a way for anyone to perform brain transplants, heart surgeries, and more without the guilt of creating a mutant creature—just use gummies instead!

10. The Science of Delicious

This periodic table by Kevin Van Aelst may not be scientifically useful, but it has all the elements of a tasty snack.

11. The Bears of Death

What could you do with a hot glue gun and some gummy bears? Chances are couldn't do anything as impressively elaborate as Emily Souleret, a sculpture student at the University of Richmond, who made this impressive skull with nothing but those two components.

12. Oh the Bear-manity

Why should you eat gummy bears? Because left on their own, they are a brutal, horrible culture that practices ritual sacrifice on their own just for the heck of it. DeviantArt user hal9002 has the proof.

13. Silent Candy

Are scary video games like Silent Hill too spine-tingling for your taste? Well maybe you should try modding them so all the characters are gummy bears. After all, DeviantArt user KaiKudo’s gummy Pyramid Head is drastically less scary than the one you see in the game.

14. Gummy Wars

Ever wonder how the Star Wars franchise would play out if reenacted by gummy bears? While I can’t tell you how the whole series would work in candy form, thanks to Tracy Sloan, I can at least show you what Darth Maul’s death scene would look like.

15. This Tender Moment

There are so many pictures of gummy bear murders online that it’s just so refreshing to finally see some happy gummies sharing a precious moment together. Special thanks to Pinar Adar for showing just how touching gummy love can be.

16. Hot Gummy on Gummy Action

Normally a kama sutra picture would require a NSFW warning, but a gummy sutra picture is only NSFD—Not Safe For Dieters. Matt Duke created this masterpiece to help celebrate Valentine’s Day back in 2007.

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‘American Gothic’ Became Famous Because Many People Saw It as a Joke
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Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

In 1930, Iowan artist Grant Wood painted a simple portrait of a farmer and his wife (really his dentist and sister) standing solemnly in front of an all-American farmhouse. American Gothic has since inspired endless parodies and is regarded as one of the country’s most iconic works of art. But when it first came out, few people would have guessed it would become the classic it is today. Vox explains the painting’s unexpected path to fame in the latest installment of the new video series Overrated.

According to host Phil Edwards, American Gothic made a muted splash when it first hit the art scene. The work was awarded a third-place bronze medal in a contest at the Chicago Art Institute. When Wood sold the painting to the museum later on, he received just $300 for it. But the piece’s momentum didn’t stop there. It turned out that American Gothic’s debut at a time when urban and rural ideals were clashing helped it become the defining image of the era. The painting had something for everyone: Metropolitans like Gertrude Stein saw it as a satire of simple farm life in Middle America. Actual farmers and their families, on the other hand, welcomed it as celebration of their lifestyle and work ethic at a time when the Great Depression made it hard to take pride in anything.

Wood didn’t do much to clear up the work’s true meaning. He stated, "There is satire in it, but only as there is satire in any realistic statement. These are types of people I have known all my life. I tried to characterize them truthfully—to make them more like themselves than they were in actual life."

Rather than suffering from its ambiguity, American Gothic has been immortalized by it. The country has changed a lot in the past century, but the painting’s dual roles as a straight masterpiece and a format for skewering American culture still endure today.

Get the full story from Vox below.

[h/t Vox]

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“Dissension” by Tobias Rothe. Original image courtesy Fondazione Federico Zeri/Università di Bologna // CC-BY 3.0
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Get Your GIFs Ready for This International Public Domain GIF-Making Competition
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“Dissension” by Tobias Rothe. Original image courtesy Fondazione Federico Zeri/Università di Bologna // CC-BY 3.0

Excellent GIF-making skills can serve you beyond material for your clever tweets. Each year, a group of four digital libraries from across the world hosts GIF IT UP, a competition to find the best animated image sourced from public domain images from their archives.

The competition is sponsored by Europeana, the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA), New Zealand’s DigitalNZ, and the National Library of Australia’s Trove, all of which host millions of public domain works. The requirements are that the source material must be in the public domain, have a 'no known copyright restrictions' statement, or have a Creative Commons license that allows its reuse. The material must also come from one of the sponsored sources. Oh, and judging by the past winners, it helps if it’s a little whimsical.

The image above won the grand prize in 2015. And this was a runner-up in 2016:

via GIPHY

This year’s prizes haven’t been announced yet (although Europeana says there will be a new one for first-time GIF makers), but last year’s grand prize winner got their own Giphoscope, and runners-up got $20 gift cards. (Turns out, there’s not a lot of money in public domain art.)

Not an expert GIFer yet? You can always revisit the audio version of DPLA’s advanced GIF-making tutorial from last year.

The fourth-annual GIF IT UP contest opens to submissions October 1.

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