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Tabitha de Luna
Tabitha de Luna

19 Great Quilts That Keep Geeks Cozy

Tabitha de Luna
Tabitha de Luna

Everyone needs something to keep them warm at night. Geeks might want one or more of these totally nerdtastic quilts.

1. A Super Super Mario Quilt

When it comes to geek quilts, there is no more popular subject than the Mario franchise. And it makes sense—the  incredibly popular games originally came out in 8-bit format, so the characters are perfectly built for quilt squares. This quilt by Moira Fogarty is particularly delightful because it is so massive and detailed—and because it has a removable coin pillow that pops out of the question box.

2. I’d Hit That

With so many other Mario quilts out there, it’s hard to stand out, but the great humor in this creation by gamer and skilled crafter Quiltoni is certainly worth a mention.

3. The Legend of Quilting

Like Mario quilts, there are tons of great Zelda quilts out there. I’ve chosen to only include this fantastic example by Etsy seller McFrogling that features Link, his heart meter, and all kinds of icons from the game around the border.

4. More Like Samus Awesome

Metroid was one of the first games with a powerful female protagonist—and I’m a particularly big fan of this intricate design by Sprite Stitch user lucyinthesky.

5. Best Robotic Friends Forever

There are a lot of Megaman quilts out there. What distinguishes this creation by Sprite Stitch reader Lynn from the rest is the decision to include Megaman’s friendly robotic dog, Rush, in the piece.

6. Suck It In, My Friends

If you ask me, there just aren’t enough great crafts or fan art dedicated to the delightful pink blob known as Kirby. At least Etsy seller bsayasane has the inflatable cutie’s back.

7. Just Keep Jumping

QBert is a perfect inspiration for quilting because that great staircase where the game takes place is so perfectly blocky. Add in your hero and a few villains and you have a lovely quilt, like this one by Lenore Edman, celebrating the wonderfully weird game classic.

8. Great Games Galore

For those with a soft spot for classic Nintendo, it’s hard to find a more fitting tribute to the console than this quilt by Flickr user needleandthread that features some of the system’s most memorable games.

9. Keep the Insect Fighters at Bay

For those old-school gamers who preferred the arcade over the home console, Carolina Patchwork’s Galaga quilt is certain to bring back memories of quarter-eating aliens.

10. Another Alien Invasion

If you always thought Space Invaders was pretty much the exact same thing as Galaga only with less insect-like ships, you’re right. But there are still plenty of people who will argue over which of the two games is better. For those on team Space Invaders, you’ll undoubtedly prefer this great quilt by Flickr user Sloth003.

11. Smash the Pigs!

For fans of more modern games, this Angry Birds quilt by Flickr user Bubbachic is sure to get your index finger twitching as you think of all the ways you could squish those pesky piggies.

12. Cozy Kitty Rivals

Can’t get enough memes in your life? Then perhaps cuddling up with this Nyan and Waffle cat quilt by Craftster user princesspimp81 would help you dream of flying pastry kitties –or at least tasty toaster-friendly snacks.

13. Dreaming of The Doctor

You may not ever be swept off your feet by a mysterious time-traveling alien that’s over 900 years old, but at least you can dream about it while you cuddle up under a comfy TARDIS quilt. Best of all, Instractables user Tabitha de Luna has all the steps you need to make your own (assuming you know the basics of quilting).

14. Spocktacular

You have to wonder if Spock would see the logic in quilting, especially a quilt with his face on it. Either way, Star Trek fans will find Instructables user funthread’s creation, and the directions to remake the quilt, quite fascinating.

15. She Made It So

Those who prefer the Next Generation over the original would be happy to pledge their loyalty to this huge Captain Picard quilt by Craftster user Semel. Oh, and if Patrick Stewart’s face on a giant quilt isn’t good enough for you, you should know that the back features the Star Trek insignia. Semel also created an equally impressive quilt featuring Sheldon from The Big Bang Theory.

16. The Force is Strong With This One

You can’t have a list of anything geeky without at least one Star Wars creation, and this R2D2 baby quilt by Craftster user dellastella is a great way to start any baby off on the path towards geeky contentedness.

17. A World of Wonder

Craftster user danynn’s great Hobbit quilt is both lovely and inspirational, something I think Tolkein himself would have appreciated.

18. Sing the Doom Song

Invader Zim may have been a relatively short-lived Nickelodeon show, but it still inspired legions of loyal fans, most of whom (including myself) are simply obsessed with Zim’s dull-witted sidekick, Gir. Craftster user lyric889 is one such fan and she managed to express her dedication with this great quilt of Gir that took a whopping 1,344 squares to finish. Impressively, this was her first attempt at quilt making.

19. Periodically Comfy

Science geeks who take comfort in the natural laws would feel nothing but cozy under this fantastic periodic table quilt by Craftster user cherry_blossom55.

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Museum Discovers Classic Renaissance Painting Hidden in Its Own Collection
Andrea Mantegna circa 1475
Andrea Mantegna circa 1475
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

A long-lost painting by a master artist of the Renaissance was recently rediscovered in the storeroom of an Italian museum near Milan, according to The Art Newspaper and The Wall Street Journal.

The painting in question, Andrea Mantegna’s 15th century The Resurrection of Christ, was found by a curator at an art museum in the city of Bergamo. The Accademia Carrara has been in possession of the Mantegna painting since the 19th century, but long ago discounted it as a copy. While working on a catalogue for the museum in March, Accademia Carrara curator Giovanni Valagussa took note of the tempera-on-panel work and began to investigate its origins.

Count Guglielmo Lochis purchased the painting in 1846, cataloguing it as an original Mantegna; it was bequeathed to the museum as part of his collection after his death in 1859. But decades later, other experts cast doubt on the originality of the work, first re-attributing it to the artist’s son, and later suggesting that it was a copy that was not even made in his workshop. The museum removed it from display sometime before 1912, and it has been in storage for more than a century.

A painting depicting Jesus rising from the dead while soldiers look on
The Resurrection of Christ
Andrea Mantegna, Accademia Carrara

Upon inspecting the painting, Valagussa suspected it was more than just a copy. The painting features a small cross at the bottom of the image that looked disconnected from the rest, and the structure of the back of the painting made it seem like it might be part of a larger work. Valagussa tracked down another Mantegna painting, Descent Into Limbo, that seemed to fit underneath—the paintings are likely two halves of one image that was cut apart.

The Accademia Carrara also conducted an infrared survey of The Resurrection of Christ, discovering that the artist drew nude figures first, then painted over them with images of clothed soldiers, a technique that Mantegna was known for.

A world expert on Mantegna, the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Keith Christiansen, did his own analysis and believes the painting in Bergamo to be an authentic, high-quality Mantegna. That means that the Accademia Carrara’s forgotten wood panel, previously insured for around $35,000, is probably worth between $25 million and $30 million.

The museum hopes to one day bring the two parts of the painting, The Resurrection of Christ and the privately owned Descent Into Limbo, together in an exhibition in the future.

[h/t The Art Newspaper]

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USPS Is Issuing Its First Scratch-and-Sniff Stamps This Summer
USPS
USPS

Summertime smells like sunscreen, barbecues, and—starting June 20, 2018—postage stamps. That's when the United States Postal Service debuts its first line of scratch-and-sniff stamps in Austin, Texas with perfumes meant to evoke "the sweet scent of summer."

The 10 stamps in the collection feature playful watercolor illustrations of popsicles by artist Margaret Berg. If the designs alone don't immediately transport you back to hot summer days spent chasing ice cream trucks, a few scratches and a whiff of the stamp should do the trick. If you're patient, you can also refrain from scratching and use them to mail a bit of summer nostalgia to your loved ones.

Since it was invented in the 1960s, scratch-and-sniff technology has been incorporated into photographs, posters, picture books, and countless kids' stickers.

The first-class mail "forever" stamps will be available in booklets of 20 for $10. You can preorder yours online before they're unveiled at the first-day-of-issue dedication ceremony at Austin's Thinkery children's museum next month.

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