CLOSE
Original image
ThinkStock

Do Big Cats Also Love Catnip?

Original image
ThinkStock

You bet they do! Just watch this:

The folks at Big Cat Rescue aren’t the first to look into this question, either. In the 1970s, zoologists from the University of Tennessee and the Knoxville Zoological Park gave catnip and smooth rocks sprayed with catnip extract to 33 of the park's big cats to see what they’d do.

The responses were mostly positive. The park’s lions and jaguars reacted most strongly to the catnip, even at very low doses. Both the males and females of these species responded the same way, but reproductive-age animals were more sensitive than either cubs/immature adults or very old animals. 

Tigers, cougars, and bobcats, meanwhile, reacted less strongly, and the park's two cheetahs never even approached the catnip or control objects. The researchers noted that the animals that responded to the catnip aren’t ones that would normally encounter it in the wild, since the catnip plant is native to North America and Europe. Except for the cheetahs, the cats that didn’t respond as much would encounter catnip in their natural habitat, and the researchers thought that the difference in the species’ reactions might be because of the plants novelty, or lack thereof. 

The animals that did respond to the catnip reacted in much the same way that domestic cats do—sniffing and licking the catnip or sprayed rocks, rubbing their chins and cheeks on it or rolling over and rubbing their body on it. The big difference the researchers found in responses was that, while domestic cats will usually respond to catnip for up to 15 minutes and then take an hour or so of “reset time” before responding again, the big cats’ response can last an hour or more and they show the same response if they lose interest and then return to the catnip just a few minutes later. 

Original image
iStock
arrow
Animals
Why Male Hyenas Have It Worse Than Females
Original image
iStock

A life of hunting zebras and raising young on the savanna isn’t half bad for a female hyena. Sadly, the same can’t be said for their male counterparts. As MinuteEarth explains, things take a downturn for the males of the species once they hit adolescence. No female in their pack will mate with them, a behavior scientists believe evolved to avoid inbreeding, so they head off in search of a different group to join. After dealing with vicious hazing from their new clan, they file in at the bottom of the rank and wait for other males above them to die so that they can slowly gain status.

Even after rising through the hierarchy, the most a male hyena can aspire to is being second place to the lowest-ranking female. Thanks to their bulky build and aggressive behavior, female hyenas enjoy a dominant position that’s rare in the animal kingdom.

After watching the video below, head over here for more facts about hyenas.

[h/t MinuteEarth]

Original image
iStock
arrow
Animals
Watch as Hummingbirds Fly, Drink, and Flap Their Tiny Wings in Slow Motion
Original image
iStock

Hummingbirds have more feathers per inch than nearly any other bird, but it’s hard to fully appreciate their luminescent colors when they beat their wings between 70 to 200 times per second.

For the enjoyment of birders everywhere, National Geographic photographer Anand Varma teamed up with bird biologists and used a high-speed, high-resolution camera to capture the tiny creatures in slow motion as they flew through wind tunnels, drank artificial nectar from a glass vessel, and shook water from their magnificent plumage.

[h/t The Kid Should See This]

SECTIONS

More from mental floss studios