The Unexplainable Humming Sound Plaguing One Canadian City

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In Windsor, Ontario, a Canadian city just across the border from Detroit, a persistent but irregular hum has become more than just a baffling mystery. It’s frustrating residents, causing them to report declining quality of life and possibly damaging their health. People liken the sound to the idling of a diesel truck or a concert subwoofer, according to The New York Times.

Even experts can’t figure out where the sound is coming from. The Canadian government has studied it. Researchers from the University of Western Ontario and the University of Windsor have studied it. One report from the University of Windsor suggested that it might be coming from blast furnaces on Zug Island, located on the Detroit River, operated by United States Steel. But the company hasn’t been cooperative with activists hoping to get to the bottom of the issue (and ultimately stop it), and the noise hums on.

It’s not just a mass delusion or a conspiracy theory perpetuated by UFO obsessives. Not everyone in Windsor hears the hum, but thousands of people do. There’s a private Facebook page dedicated to discussing it, and people from Windsor call Tracey Ramsey, their Parliament representative, to complain of headaches, mental health issues, and insomnia caused by the noise.

But Windsor isn’t the only town with a mysterious noise problem. The World Hum Map and Database Project, run by a high school teacher in British Columbia, has been collecting and mapping reports of hums since 2012, showing that it truly is a global phenomenon. The persistent, unexplainable sound of a hum, much like the sound of a generator, has affected people across the world, from Scotland to Florida to South Africa. Some of these noises can be traced back to concrete sources, like ultra-low-frequency sound from factories, or in one case, the mating calls of a fish, but most, according to the New Republic’s 2016 investigation of the worldwide phenomena, remain mysteries even after research by universities and government officials. “It’s like chasing a ghost,” University of Windsor professor Colin Novak told the CBC of the study he led on the Windsor hum. The town of Windsor may never find out for sure what the sound is, or how to stop it.

[h/t The New York Times]

How Often Should You Poop?

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iStock

When it comes to No. 2, plenty of people aren’t really sure what’s normal. Are you supposed to go every day? What if you go 10 times a day? Is that a sign that you’re dying? What about once every three days? Short of asking everyone you know for their personal poop statistics, how do you know how often you’re supposed to hit the head?

Everyone’s system is a little different, and according to experts, regularity is more important than how often you do the deed. Though some lucky people might think of having a bowel movement as an integral part of their morning routine, most people don’t poop every day, as Lifehacker informs us. In fact, if you go anywhere between three times a day and three times a week, you’re within the normal range.

It’s when things change that you need to pay attention. If you typically go twice a day and you suddenly find yourself becoming a once-every-three-days person, something is wrong. The same thing goes if you normally go once every few days but suddenly start running to the toilet every day.

There are a number of factors that can influence how often you go, including your travel schedule, your medications, your exercise routine, your coffee habit, your stress levels, your hangover, and, of course, your diet. (You should be eating at least 25 to 30 grams of fiber a day, a goal that most Americans fall significantly short of.)

If you do experience a sudden change in how often you take a seat on the porcelain throne, you should probably see a doctor. It could be something serious, like celiac disease, cancer, or inflammatory bowel disease. Or perhaps you just need to eat a lot more kale. Only a doctor can tell you.

However, if you do have trouble going, please, don’t spend your whole day sitting on the toilet. It’s terrible for your butt. You shouldn’t spend more than 10 to 15 minutes on the toilet, as one expert told Men’s Health, or you’ll probably give yourself hemorrhoids.

But if you have a steady routine of pooping three times a day, by all means, keep doing what you’re doing. Just maybe get yourself a bidet.

Have you got a Big Question you'd like us to answer? If so, let us know by emailing us at bigquestions@mentalfloss.com.

Jazz Icon Charles Mingus Wrote a Manual for Toilet Training Your Cat

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iStock

Imagine it's the 1950s and you're in a basement jazz club in New York City. A haze of smoke lingers in a dusky room, glasses clink as waiters drop off martinis and Manhattans, and people bop their heads to the sounds of Charles Mingus, the hottest jazz bassist around. After the performance, Mingus pulls up to the bar and cradles a stiff drink. You approach him, but before you can say anything, the musician turns to you and asks an important question: Hey, man. Where does your cat poop?

This isn't as far-fetched as it sounds. Besides being one of the most revolutionary jazz artists of his day, Mingus was also a passionate advocate for teaching people how to toilet train their cats. So passionate, in fact, that he wrote instructions for a cat toilet training program (he called it the "CAT-alog"), which he routinely tried to sell at his gigs. He even placed print ads so that interested clients could buy his pamphlets via mail order.

The CAT-alog is a reflection of the man as a musician: blunt, concise, and demanding in its details. (You can read the instructions in their entirety here.) He swore by the program's effectiveness, claiming it took three or four weeks for his cat, Nightlife, to transition from the litter box to the porcelain throne.

Here's a breakdown of Mingus's process:

First, teach your cat to use a homemade cardboard litter box. ("Be sure to use torn up newspaper, not kitty litter. Stop using kitty litter. [When the time comes you cannot put sand in a toilet.]") Gradually, begin inching the box toward the bathroom. ("He has to learn how to follow it.") Once you've reached the bathroom, place the box on the toilet. ("Don't bug the cat now, don't rush him, because you might throw him off.") Then cut a small hole in the bottom of the cardboard ("Less than an apple—about the size of a plum."), and gradually cut down the sides of the box until it becomes a flat sheet. ("Put the flat cardboard, which is left, under the lid of the toilet seat, and pray.") Then, one day, remove the cardboard entirely.

Mingus insisted that, with patience, his methods would work. In fact, he advised: "Don't be surprised if you hear the toilet flush in the middle of the night. A cat can learn how to do it, spurred on by his instinct to cover up." In 2014, however, Studio 360 at WNYC put Mingus's instructions to the test … and failed.

Some cats, Mingus admits, just aren't "as smart as Nightlife was." But he'd likely agree that cats, like jazz musicians, really aren't the types to be bossed around.

For more, please listen to actor Reg E. Cathey read a silky smooth excerpt of Mingus's CAT-alog here. Trust us: You'll be glad you did.

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