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16 Fun Facts About Grumpy Cat

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Last night, the grouchiest Internet-famous feline came to New York City to attend The Friskies—an awards show that crowns the best cat videos of the year—and to pick up a Lifetime Achievement Award, even though she hasn't even hit 2 yet. "In her short year and a half, she’s accomplished so much," says Shawn Brain, brand manager of Friskies, which created the show. "So she seemed like the ideal candidate for the award." (The Friskies, now in its second year, isn't just about handing out awards: Friskies also donated 5 cans of food to shelters for every cat video submitted, so 330,000 cans went to shelters across the country.)

We sat down with Grumpy Cat and her humans—Tabatha Bundesen, her brother Bryan, and her daughter Crystal—to find out all we could about this seriously cranky (and seriously cute!) kitty.


Grumpy Cat answers mental_floss's questions, but she's not happy about it. Photo by Erin McCarthy.

1. Grumpy was born on April 4, 2012, at the Bundesen's house in Morristown, Arizona. Her mother is a calico, but Tabatha says they're not 100 percent sure who Grumpy's dad is.

2. Grumpy's unique look comes from feline dwarfism and an underbite. She became an Internet hit when Bryan posted a photo of her on Reddit in September 2012.

3. Grumpy has a brother named Pokey. "He’s black and white, but he does have dwarfism, so he’s super short and cute too," Tabatha says. "His face isn’t as frowny as hers, but he does have an underbite."

4. Grumpy's not actually that grumpy—in fact, she's pretty lovable! Most of the time, Grumpy is very calm, but she can also be playful (she particularly likes to hide behind curtains). "She’s super frisky, especially between 3 and 6 a.m.—when you’re trying to get your deepest sleep, she’s wanting to play," Tabatha says. "Pokey actually has more of a grumpy personality."

5. Crystal came up with Grumpy Cat's real name—Tardar Sauce—which was inspired by two things: Grumpy's original orangish coloring ("She thought Grumpy looked like Tartar sauce," Tabatha says) and the fact that, at the time, Tabatha was waitressing at Red Lobster and had just made Crystal try the stuff. "She was like, 'Ew, no!' and I said 'Honey, you have to try it! It goes with fish!' So it was fresh in her mind when the kitten was born."

6. Even though it's not her given name, Grumpy Cat will also answer to Grumpy. In fact, "it's pretty much Grumpy all the time now," Tabatha says.

7. Her favorite Friskies food is Savory Shreds. "I think it's the gravy," Tabatha says. "She really loves it." Non-Friskies? Tuna and Starbucks coffee cake.

Grumpy and her humans accepting the Lifetime Achievement Award. Photo courtesy of Getty Images.

8. Critics have questioned whether Grumpy should be traveling so much, but Grumpy actually loves it. "I don’t feel like she’s being abused or exploited by traveling," Tabatha says. "I feel like she gets excited—she knows! When I get her carrier out, she’ll come and climb in it. I think she’s kind of liking it."

9. Other Grumpy myths the Bundesons would like to dispel: That Grumpy's in front of the camera all the time (they shoot one week's worth of daily grumps in one sitting) and that Grumpy has been sedated at book signings and other appearances. "She never has been and never will be," Bryan says. "She's really active at night, and sleeps during the day—she always has," which is why she seems sleepy at events.

10. In fact, stipulations that ensure Grumpy's well-being are written into every agreement and contract. "Her health and safety is the most important thing to us," Bryan says. There aren't any diva-esque demands on Grumpy's rider, either: All she needs, Tabatha says, are "bottles of water and a cool place to sit!"

11. Grumpy's favorite things to play with? Bags and string.

12. Grumpy got involved with Friskies through the brand's "Will Kitty Play With It?" videos. "Her three videos have racked up over a million views to date," Brain says. 

Of winning the Lifetime Achievement Award, Bryan says, "It’s very exciting. We still can’t believe it. We keep hitting new milestones. Friskies has been our favorite place to work with so far. They take great care of us." The partnership shows no signs of slowing down: "Stay tuned for more from Friskies and Grumpy Cat," Friskies brand manager Shawn Brain says.

13. Grumpy will be dressing up for Halloween—but no costume has been decided on yet. "There’s a few that we’ve tried on," Tabatha says. "You can take her into Petsmart and put them on her, so we’ve had a little too much fun doing it. Most important is finding one that is comfortable for her—I don’t want to put her in one that will make it hard to walk—and stylish."

14. Grumpy Cat wrote a book—and it made the New York Times bestseller list.

15. There's a Grumpy Cat movie in development! "It’s moving forward," Bryan says. "It’s a slow process. We've read all the scripts that have been submitted, and given our comments. We have our favorites." The world's cutest, crankiest kitten also recently started shipping her line of coffee drinks and will be releasing plush toys in time for the holidays.

16. Grumpy Cat has totally changed her owners' lives. "I’ve been waitressing for 10 years, barely making ends meet," Tabatha says. "Now I get to travel with the cat, and I’m homeschooling Crystal, so we get to spend more time together. I hardly ever saw my brother before all this happened, maybe once or twice in 10 years, and now I get to see him every couple months at least. It's a huge positive change. Plus, there's the joy that Grumpy Cat is spreading—or grumpiness. But really, everybody’s smiling."

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Rising Temperatures Are Killing Off African Wild Dogs
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Over the last few decades, images of fluffy white harp seals, polar bears, and penguins have become shorthand for climate change's creeping destruction of our planet. But the poles aren't the only ecosystems in danger. A new study published in the Journal of Animal Ecology finds that rising temperatures near the equator are making it much harder for African wild dogs to survive.

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The researchers overlaid information about local weather and temperature with data on the dogs' hunting habits, the size of each litter of pups, and how many pups from each litter survived.

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"It's really scary," Woodroffe said.

"If you are an animal who makes your living by running around really fast, obviously you are going to get hot. But there are not enough hours in the day anymore that are cool enough to do that. It is possible that some of these big areas will become too hot for wild dogs to exist."

Woodroffe and her colleagues were not anticipating such clear-cut results. "It is shocking and surprising that even right on the equator these effects are being seen," she said. "It illustrates the global impact of climate change." 

[h/t The Guardian]

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