Researchers Pinpoint the Geographic Location of "The Middle of Nowhere"

iStock
iStock

The place to go when you want to get away from it all, The Washington Post reports, is Glasgow, Montana. About 4.5 hours from the nearest city, it's about as close as you can get to "the middle of nowhere" in the contiguous U.S. while still being in a decently-sized town.

Glasgow's isolated status was determined in a study from Oxford University published in the journal Nature [PDF]. Scientists at the Malaria Atlas Project, a part of Oxford’s Big Data Institute, wanted to use geography and demographic data to see which towns qualify as truly being in the middle of nowhere. For the study, a town was defined as having a population of at least 1000, and a metropolitan area as having 75,000 residents or more.

After crunching the numbers on the elevation levels, transportation options, and terrain types around America, they were able to say roughly how long it would take for someone to traverse any given square kilometer of land in the country. If you're one of the 3363 people living in Glasgow, which is nestled in northeastern Montana, it would take you between 4 and 5 hours to drive to the nearest metro area. That entire corner of the state lays claim to the title of Middle of Nowhere, U.S.A. Scobey, Montana, less than 100 miles from Glasgow, is the second most isolated small town in the country, and Wolf Point, less than 50 miles away, takes third place.

Go beyond the continental U.S. and you'll find plenty of places that aren't even accessible by car. Here are more isolated towns you have to travel to the middle of nowhere to reach.

[h/t The Washington Post]

Which Country Is the Landmark From?

The 10 Most Stressed-Out States in America

iStock.com/Creative-Family
iStock.com/Creative-Family

Stress levels are on the rise across the U.S. According to an American Psychiatric Association-sponsored survey, nearly 40 percent of people reported feeling more anxious in 2018 than they did last year. But tensions are running higher in some states than others. To see which states have the most stressed-out residents, check out the list below from Zippia.

To compile the ranking, the job search engine scored each state in America on six criteria: commute times, unemployment rates, work hours, population density, home price to income ratio, and rates of uninsured residents. After sifting through data from the U.S. Census Bureau's American Community Survey for 2012 through 2016, they came up with the top 10 states where stress levels are highest.

New Jersey nabbed the top spot because of its lengthy commute times, long work hours, and a high housing cost to income ratio. Georgia, with its high unemployment and uninsured rates, came in second place. And despite all the sunshine and beautiful coastlines, Florida and California residents still have plenty to be stressed about, with the states ranking third and fourth, respectively.

1. New Jersey
2. Georgia
3. Florida
4. California
5. New York
6. Louisiana
7. Maryland
8. North Carolina
9. Virginia
10. Mississippi

The most stressed-out states in America tend to fall on the coasts, with Midwestern states like Minnesota, North Dakota, and Iowa enjoying the lowest stress levels, according to a 2017 analysis from WalletHub. To see where your state ranks, you can check out the full map of high-anxiety states on Zippia's website. If you see your home state near the top of the list, consider implementing a few of these relaxation strategies into your daily routine.

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER