Look Up! Residents of Maine and Michigan Might Catch a Glimpse of the Northern Lights Tonight

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iStock

The aurora borealis, a celestial show usually reserved for spectators near the arctic circle, could potentially appear over parts of the continental U.S. on the night of February 15. As Newsweek reports, a solar storm is on track to illuminate the skies above Maine and Michigan.

The Northern Lights (and the Southern Lights) are caused by electrons from the sun colliding with gases in the Earth’s atmosphere. The solar particles transfer some of their energy to oxygen and nitrogen molecules on contact, and as these excited molecules settle back to their normal states they release light particles. The results are glowing waves of blue, green, purple, and pink light creating a spectacle for viewers on Earth.

The more solar particles pelt the atmosphere, the more vivid these lights become. Following a moderate solar flare that burst from the sun on Monday, the NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center forecast a solar light show for tonight. While the Northern Lights are most visible from higher latitudes where the planet’s magnetic field is strongest, northern states are occasionally treated to a view. This is because the magnetic North Pole is closer to the U.S. than the geographic North Pole.

This Thursday night into Friday morning is expected to be one of those occasions. To catch a glimpse of the phenomena from your backyard, wait for the sun to go down and look toward the sky. People living in places with little cloud cover and light pollution will have the best chance of spotting it.

[h/t Newsweek]

See What Hurricane Florence Looks Like From Space

NASA via Getty Images
NASA via Getty Images

As Hurricane Florence continues to creep its way toward the Carolinas, it’s repeatedly being described as both "the storm of the century” and "the storm of a lifetime” for parts of the coastlines of North and South Carolina. While that may sound like hyperbole to some, Alexander Gerst—an astronaut with the European Space Agency—took to Twitter to prove otherwise with a few amazing photos, and issued a warning to “Watch out, America!”

According to the National Weather Service, “Hurricane Florence will be approaching the Carolina shores as the day progresses on Thursday. Although the exact timing, location, and eventual track of Florence isn't known, local impacts will likely begin in the afternoon hours and only worsen with time throughout the evening and overnight period.”

On Tuesday, Wilmington, North Carolina's National Weather Service took the warning even one step further, writing: "This will likely be the storm of a lifetime for portions of the Carolina coast, and that's saying a lot given the impacts we've seen from Hurricanes Diana, Hugo, Fran, Bonnie, Floyd, and Matthew. I can't emphasize enough the potential for unbelievable damage from wind, storm surge, and inland flooding with this storm.”

Gerst’s photos certainly drive that point home.

Is Pluto a Planet After All? A New Argument Emerges

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iStock

It’s been a tumultuous few years for Pluto. The dwarf planet, first discovered in 1930 by astronomer Clyde Tombaugh, was stripped of its more esteemed planet status in 2006 by the International Astronomical Union (IAU) because its orbit overlapped that of Neptune. A new set of IAU criteria mandated that a planet must orbit the sun, be spherical as a result of gravity, and "clear" the "neighborhood" around its orbit, asserting itself as the dominant presence. Pluto met the first and second edicts but not the third, relegating it to the lesser dwarf planet designation.

That declaration led to an ongoing debate over whether Pluto really earned its demotion. The newest and potentially most compelling argument comes courtesy of a paper from researchers at the University of Central Florida's Space Institute and published in the planetary science journal Icarus. In it, first author Philip Metzger asserts that no one since 1802 has used the cleared-space argument to define a planet. Referring to the IAU's definition as "sloppy," Metzger and his co-authors point out that no one else has separated asteroids from planets by using the clearing mandate. Planets, the paper argues, should not be held to dynamic descriptions of bodies that may change over time.

"We now have a list of well over 100 recent examples of planetary scientists using the word planet in a way that violates the IAU definition, but they are doing it because it's functionally useful," Metzger said in a statement. "It's a sloppy definition. They didn't say what they meant by clearing their orbit. If you take that literally, then there are no planets, because no planet clears its orbit."

Metzger is advocating instead for a planet obtaining its status due to being large enough to achieve a gravity-influenced spherical shape that activates geological changes.

Speaking with CNN, IAU spokesperson Lars Lindberg Christensen indicated a motion could be put forward to have the group reevaluate the classification but that no one had yet done so.

Whatever Pluto is or may one day become, it was a planet to Tombaugh, who wasn't around long enough to experience the reclassification. He died in 1997. In 2015, his ashes, attached to the New Horizons space probe, entered Pluto's orbit after nine years of travel.

[h/t Science Alert]

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