How Finland's Snowboarding Coach Knits His Nerves Away

David Ramos, Getty Images
David Ramos, Getty Images

If coaching world-class snowboarders doesn’t work out for Finnish snowboarding coach Antti Koskinen, he already has a start on a fallback career: professional knitter.

During slopestyle qualifying rounds at the 2018 Winter Games in Pyeongchang over the weekend, Koskinen was spotted at the top of the run clutching yarn and a pair of needles, even shedding his gloves in the frigid temps to get a better grip.

Though eagle-eyed viewers turned to social media to delight in the coach’s unusual pastime, it’s not the first time Koskinen has channeled his Olympic nerves into knitting needles. He worked on a scarf while advising snowboarders at the 2014 Sochi Winter Games, explaining that it helped lighten the mood for his nerve-wracked athletes just before a competition. Other athletes joined in with the intention of passing the pieces to their 2016 Summer Games counterparts.

This year, Koskinen’s craftiness has not only returned—it now serves a purpose beyond helping athletes keep their chill on the slopes.

So far, Koskinen and Team Finland haven't been able to spin wool into gold just yet, though they have claimed a couple of bronze medals. But that’s OK—they’re still a close-knit team.

The New Tokyo 2020 Olympic Medals Are Made From Recycled Electronics

Tokyo 2020
Tokyo 2020

The Olympics have ancient roots, but Tokyo is finding ways to update the event in time for the summer games in 2020. The latest idea shared by the organizing committee may not be as flashy as an artificial meteor shower or as essential as modernized toilets, but it's no less innovative. As Engadget reports, all of the medals awarded at the 2020 Summer Olympics will be made from recycled electronics—and their designs have been unveiled to the public for the first time.

Many electronics contain precious metals like copper, silver, and gold—the same elements needed to make the Olympic medals. With hundreds of pounds of the materials destined to become e-waste in Japan each year, the Olympic committee came up with a plan to put some of it to good use.

In 2017, the Olympics organizers called upon Japanese residents to donate their old smartphones and other devices so they could be made into medals for the 2020 games. Over the past two years, the committee has collected 78,985 tons of donated electronics (including more than 6.2 million phones), and from that haul they've recovered approximately 70 pounds of gold, 7716 pounds of silver, and 4850 pounds of bronze, which was more than enough material to cast new medals for each Olympic event. You can get a peek at the design of the final products in the video below.

The 2020 Olympics will mark Tokyo's second time hosting the games (their first go was in 1964). By the time the games conclude next summer, organizers are expected to have spent $20 billion putting the event together.

[h/t Engadget]

How to Tie Your Shoes With One Hand, According to a Paralympian

iStock
iStock

Megan Absten lost her left arm in an ATV accident when she was 14, but the injury hasn't stopped her from doing extraordinary things like competing for the U.S. track and field team in the Paralympics. Nor has it stopped her from completing everyday tasks that most people need two hands for—like tying her shoes. After the shoe-tying methods she learned in physical therapy didn't cut it for her, she had to come up with her own one-handed trick. She shares her process in a new video spotted by Lifehacker.

First things first: Lay your laces on either side of your shoe. Next, use your hand to cross them and tuck one end through to make the beginning of your knot. Pin the end of one lace beneath the bottom of your foot to hold it tight, then pull the second lace up with your hand.

Now, you're ready to make your bunny ears. Create a loop with the free lace and pinch it between your thumb and index finger. Then, use your middle finger to grab the lace that you’ve been holding under your shoe. Circle this string around the loop, then push it through the opening to create your second bunny ear. Tighten the new knot by sticking your index finger and thumb in each loop and spreading them wide.

Watch Absten explain the process for herself in the video below. If you're feeling more advanced, she also demonstrates a second technique for you to try.

Once you've mastered those methods, try out these shoe hacks for happier feet.

[h/t Lifehacker]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER