Here's How Much Traffic Congestion Costs the World's Biggest Cities

iStock
iStock

Traffic congestion isn't just a nuisance for the people who get trapped in gridlock on their way to work, it’s also a problem for a city's economy, City Lab reports. According to a study from the transportation consulting firm INRIX, all that time stuck in traffic can cost the world’s major cities tens of billions of dollars each year.

The study, the largest to examine vehicle traffic on a global scale, measured congestion in 1360 cities across 38 countries. Los Angeles ranked number one internationally with drivers spending an average of 102 hours in traffic jams during peak times in a year. Moscow and New York City were close behind, both with 91 lost hours, followed by Sao Paulo in Brazil with 86 and San Francisco with 79.

INRIX also calculated the total cost to the cities based on their congestion numbers. While Los Angeles loses a whopping $19.2 billion a year to time wasted on the road, New York City takes the biggest hit. Traffic accounts for $33.7 billion lost by the city annually, or an average of $2982 per driver. The cost is $10.6 billion a year for San Francisco and $7.1 billion for Atlanta. Those figures are based on factors like the loss of productivity from workers stuck in their cars, higher road transportation costs, and the fuel burned by vehicles going nowhere.

Congestion on the highway can be caused by something as dramatic as a car crash or as minor as a nervous driver tapping their brakes too often. Driverless cars could eventually fix this problem, but until then, the fastest solution may be to discourage people from getting behind the wheel in the first place.

[h/t City Lab]

These Hoodies Are Made From Recycled Plastic Bottles and Used Coffee Grounds

Coalatree
Coalatree

Sustainable fashion is getting creative. Different manufacturers have made “leather” out of everything from mushrooms to pineapples, as well as an environmentally-friendly fabric derived from banana peels. Now, drawstring hoodies made from used coffee grounds and recycled plastic bottles are hitting the market.

The Evolution Hoodie is the latest product from Coalatree, a Salt Lake City-based company that specializes in goods made from sustainably sourced materials. To create this hoodie, employees typically collect used coffee grounds from local shops on their way into work. Next, they dry the coffee, remove the oils, grind the grounds into smaller particles, then mix it with the melted plastic bottles to create a type of yarn.

More specifically, each hoodie is made from three cups of coffee and 10 plastic bottles. And in case you were wondering: it doesn’t smell like coffee (which may be a good or bad thing, depending on your personal tastes).

The hoodie is ideal for those who want to incorporate more eco-friendly products into their lives, and Coalatree's clothes are designed with active, outdoorsy types in mind. (Outside magazine, for instance, called Coalatree’s Trailheads the “best hiking pants.”) Its lightweight, quick-dry fabric and UV ray protection make it suitable for a number of outdoor activities, such as hiking, biking, or kayaking.

With a pickpocket-proof zippered pouch to store your things, as well as a loop to clip your keys onto, it’s also travel-approved. If you get hot, you can take the hoodie off and fold it up into its own pocket, transforming it into a makeshift travel pillow. The hoodie is currently available in a few colors, including oatmeal, black, maroon, and green.

Buy it on Kickstarter for $62.

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Disney's Most Magical Destinations Have Been Reimagined as Vintage Travel Posters

UpgradedPoints.com
UpgradedPoints.com

Many of the iconic settings of animated Disney movies were modeled after real places around the world. Ussé Castle in France’s Loire Valley, for example, is widely rumored to have been the inspiration behind the original Sleeping Beauty story. (Although the castle in the movie more closely resembles Germany's Neuschwanstein Castle.) Likewise, the fictional island in Moana was made to look like Samoa, and the Sultan’s palace in Aladdin shares some similarities with India's Taj Mahal.

If you’ve ever dreamed of exploring Agrabah or Neverland, then you’ll probably enjoy getting lost in these Disney-inspired travel posters from the designers at UpgradedPoints.com, an online resource that helps individuals maximize their credit card travel rewards. Only one of the posters features a real destination ("Beautiful France"), but these illustrations let you get one step closer to scaling Pride Rock or plumbing the depths of Atlantica.

All of the images are rendered in a vintage style with enticing slogans attached—much like the exotic travel posters that were prevalent in the 1930s.

“A few of our designers wanted to capture that longing to experience the true locations of these fantastic films, and the inner child in all of us couldn’t resist seeing how they interpreted the locations of their favorite films,” UpgradedPoints.com writes. “The results are breathtaking and make us wish we could fall into our favorite Disney movies.”

Keep scrolling to see the posters, and for more travel inspiration, read up on eight real-life locations that inspired Disney places (plus one that didn't).

A Disney-inspired poster of France
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An Atlantica travel poster
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A Disney-inspired poster
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A Disney-inspired poster
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A Lion King travel poster
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A Neverland travel poster
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