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25 Things You Didn't Know About Nickelodeon

Whether you preferred the drama of Hey Dude, the postmodern sensibility of Clarissa Explains It All, or the gross-out humor of Ren & Stimpy, if you were a kid in the '90s, there's a good chance your favorite TV channel was Nickelodeon. Here's what went on behind the scenes, as uncovered by Matthew Klickstein in Slimed! An Oral History of Nickelodeon's Golden Age.

1. Designer Tom Corey chose orange and lime green for Nickelodeon's logo because they're international distress colors.

2. There were many different recipes for the famous green slime that originated on You Can't Do That on Television. A few key ingredients: Cream of Wheat, green food coloring, Johnson's baby shampoo, vegetable oil, and occasionally cottage cheese.

3. Roger Price, creator of You Can't Do That on Television, slimed kids for saying, "I don't know," because he found it annoying. And dumping water for saying "water"? That was just funny. After the cast started complaining about how much slime and water were dumped on them, they received bonus payments—$25 to $50 extra—for getting soaked.

4. The creators of Ghostbusters, released in 1984, tried to sue Price for stealing the idea of green slime. They dropped the lawsuit when he pointed out that he'd been sliming kids since 1979, so Ghostbusters must have stolen the idea from him.

5. The child actors on the early shows didn't end up rich. Early Nickelodeon was low-budget and non-union, so they never got residuals.

6. You Can't Do That on Television didn't allow parents on the set. The kids weren't allowed to take scripts home, either.

7. Nickelodeon Studios originally printed the blimp logo on its toilet paper. But visitors kept stealing it, so they switched to plain.

8. The Double Dare set was designed to look like a bathroom.

Courtesy of Facebook.com/DoubleDare

9. Double Dare didn't allow contestants who'd had a number of previous injuries.

10. Because the hot lights on-set would bake Cream of Wheat, Double Dare made its slime with applesauce. The rowdy crew, known for recreational drug use off-set, called the slime GAK after the street name for heroin.

11. Double Dare host Marc Summers has OCD and sometimes struggled with all the slime and mess on the job.

12. Casio offered Nickelodeon $1 million to put its logo on the Double Dare clock. The network declined.

13. Nickelodeon recorded a number of doo-wop bumpers, those short clips played between a show and a commercial, because research shows that kids respond well to doo-wop music.

14. On Pete & Pete, Little Pete's signature red hunting cap was an homage to The Catcher in the Rye's Holden Caulfield.

15. Only Mark Mulcahy, who wrote and sang the Pete & Pete theme song, knows what it's really about—or can easily decipher all the words.

16. There was almost a Clarissa Explains It All album. The group name: Clarissa and the Straitjackets. The first single: "This Is What Na-Na Means."

17. The Midnight Society kids on Are You Afraid of the Dark? weren't allowed to be shown lighting the campfire.

18. Alex Mack of The Secret World of Alex Mack was first written as a male character.

19. The polling for the Kids' Choice Awards was originally done at amusement parks or McDonald's.

20. Geraldine Laybourne ran Nickelodeon from 1980 to 1996, turning the lowest-rated cable network into #1. She left for a job at ... Disney.

21. The warped mind behind The Ren & Stimpy Show, John Kricfalusi, was fired during the second season due to "creative differences" and ongoing work disputes. Nickelodeon Games Animation produced the last three seasons without him.

22. Laybourne later said Ren & Stimpy should've been a show on Nickelodeon's struggling sister channel, MTV.

23. E.G. Daily, the voice of Tommy Pickles on Rugrats, played Dottie in Pee-wee's Big Adventure.

24. Rugrats cut down on appearances by Boris and Minka, Didi Pickles' immigrant parents, when the Anti-Defamation League complained that they were offensive Jewish caricatures.

25. Co-creators Gábor Csupó and Arlene Klasky divorced while working together on Rugrats. They're still business partners.

See Also: Every Item Inside the Time Capsule Nickelodeon Buried in 1992

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travel
The Real Bay of Pigs: Big Major Cay in the Bahamas
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When most people visit the Bahamas, they’re thinking about a vacation filled with sun, sand, and swimming—not swine. But you can get all four of those things if you visit Big Major Cay.

Big Major Cay, also now known as “Pig Island” for obvious reasons, is part of the Exuma Cays in the Bahamas. Exuma includes private islands owned by Johnny Depp, Tyler Perry, Faith Hill and Tim McGraw, and David Copperfield. Despite all of the local star power, the real attraction seems to be the family of feral pigs that has established Big Major Cay as their own. It’s hard to say how many are there—some reports say it’s a family of eight, while others say the numbers are up to 40. However big the band of roaming pigs is, none of them are shy: Their chief means of survival seems to be to swim right up to boats and beg for food, which the charmed tourists are happy to provide (although there are guidelines about the best way of feeding the pigs).

No one knows exactly how the pigs got there, but there are plenty of theories. Among them: 1) A nearby resort purposely released them more than a decade ago, hoping to attract tourists. 2) Sailors dropped them off on the island, intending to dine on pork once they were able to dock for a longer of period of time. For one reason or another, the sailors never returned. 3) They’re descendants of domesticated pigs from a nearby island. When residents complained about the original domesticated pigs, their owners solved the problem by dropping them off at Big Major Cay, which was uninhabited. 4) The pigs survived a shipwreck. The ship’s passengers did not.

The purposeful tourist trap theory is probably the least likely—VICE reports that the James Bond movie Thunderball was shot on a neighboring island in the 1960s, and the swimming swine were there then.

Though multiple articles reference how “adorable” the pigs are, don’t be fooled. One captain warns, “They’ll eat anything and everything—including fingers.”

Here they are in action in a video from National Geographic:

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Pop Culture
The House From The Money Pit Is For Sale

Looking for star-studded new digs? For a cool $5.9 million, Top10RealEstateDeals.com reports, you can own the Long Island country home featured in the 1986 comedy The Money Pit—no renovations required.

For the uninitiated, the film features Tom Hanks and Shelley Long as hapless first-time homeowners who purchase a rundown mansion for cheap. The savings they score end up being paltry compared to the debt they incur while trying to fix up the house.

The Money Pit featured exterior shots of "Northway," an eight-bedroom estate located in the village of Lattingtown in Nassau County, New York. Luckily for potential buyers, its insides are far nicer than the fictional ones portrayed in the movie, thanks in part to extensive renovations performed by the property’s current owners.

Amenities include a giant master suite with a French-style dressing room, eight fireplaces, a "wine wall," and a heated outdoor saltwater pool. Check out some photos below, or view the entire listing here.

The real-life Long Island home featured in “The Money Pit”
TopTenRealEstateDeals.com

The real-life Long Island home featured in “The Money Pit”
TopTenRealEstateDeals.com

The real-life Long Island home featured in “The Money Pit”
TopTenRealEstateDeals.com

The real-life Long Island home featured in “The Money Pit”
TopTenRealEstateDeals.com

The real-life Long Island home featured in “The Money Pit”
TopTenRealEstateDeals.com

The real-life Long Island home featured in 1986's “The Money Pit”
TopTenRealEstateDeals.com

The real-life Long Island home featured in 1986's “The Money Pit”
TopTenRealEstateDeals.com

[h/t Top10RealEstateDeals.com]

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