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Jubilant Antics!

At the Libraries: Literary Mugshots

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Jubilant Antics!

Banned Books Week just wrapped up, and to celebrate, here are some great "wanted" posters of frequently banned protagonists

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Meanwhile, a banned book tale with a happy ending: Invisible Man is being unbanned in North Carolina! Close call, Randolph County, close call.

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But in Minnesota, one young adult author's visit was cancelled because she dropped too many f-bombs in her book. Boo to you, Anoka County! 

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If you aren't sure whether a book should be banned, or you have other book-related queries, then this new advice column is for you! 

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This cat librarian dresses for his job.

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Anyone tried out Oyster yet? They say it's Netflix for books...

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Jezebel wants to know, what childhood book turned you into a reader? I'm going with "them all," but if you made me choose, Corduroy by Don Freeman. That's the first one I really remember poring over (and over and over)...

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In international news this month, the record for the world's longest book domino chain was recently broken (pending Guinness review) in South Africa. Way to go, Cape Town Central Library! 

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And over in Latvia, rather than wait for a library renovation to reopen, students built their own library tower! You've gotta see it to believe it.

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Have you heard? The National Book Award long lists are out! I prefer a short list, myself, but I'm sure all the authors who made the cut would disagree. I've only read one of these books, eek! Fifty points if you can guess which one...

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In other award news, Britain's Man Booker Prize is being opened up to ... uh oh... Americans!  I think I'd be mad, too. That really widens the playing field.

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Here are some ideas for your book collection, if you are thinking of redecorating. This one is a bit less functional than this one, but they both look great!

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Or maybe you are thinking of getting engaged, and then married? Here is a plethora of ideas for making each step toward wedded bliss as literary as possible. I love them all!

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Enjoy your October, and I will see you next month with all the great library and literary tidbits I find!

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Vampires, Ghosts, and Dark Shadows Beauty Pageants
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iStock

Vampires, Ghosts, and the Dark Shadows Beauty Pageants of the Early 1970s. The Miss American Vampire Contest was a hit, but Miss Ghost America was not.

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As Users Opt for the Discounted iPhone 7, iPhone 8 Sales Underwhelm. It turns out that price and features matter more than owning the latest version, which may bode poorly for the iPhone X.

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Naps Have Amazing Health Benefits. Just a little shut-eye can make you more productive the rest of the day.

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The Incredible Story of Dawn Doe, the Real Skeleton in Dawn of the Dead. The movie crew didn't know they were using a real human skeleton until years later.

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There are No Spiders in This Pie. In case you were thinking there were, which you were not.

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It's Time to Bring Back Memento Mori.  Reminders of our own mortality could spur us to make the most out of the time we have.

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12 Creepy DIY Halloween Projects to Scare Your Guests. Any of them will add life to your Halloween party!

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The Phantoms of Paris
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The Phantoms of Paris. Dark ghost stories from the City of Light.

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How Hippies Put on the Worst Music Festival in History. The Erie Canal Soda Pop Festival outdid Woodstock in bad planning and poor execution.

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A Very Special 1970s Nightmare, Starring Vincent Price, H.R. Pufnstuf, and the Brady Bunch. Variety shows were a simple way for TV networks to recycle familiar faces.

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Just About Everything We Know About the Pard. For hundreds of years, the leopard was thought to be a cross between a lion and a pard.

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Lt. Cliff Judkins Fell 15,000 Feet and Lived. His fighter jet caught fire, his ejection seat didn't work, and his parachute didn't open.

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The Great Thaw of the American North is Coming. The loss of permafrost will have profound effects.

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The Creepiest Urban Legend in Every State. How does your state's tale stack up against the others?

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Ada Lovelace: The First Computer Programmer. In the 1840s, she crunched the numbers that were the software for a theoretical machine.

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