Take a Virtual Ride on This 90,000-Piece LEGO Roller Coaster

Courtesy of Tomáš Kašpařík
Courtesy of Tomáš Kašpařík

A thrilling new POV video puts you in the front seat of a roller coaster made completely out of LEGOs. Spotted by Gizmodo's Sploid, the coaster was built by LEGO enthusiast and YouTuber Tomáš Kašpařík (aka Chairudo) in 2017, and was recently installed in a Prague toy store for its Czech RepuBRICK exhibition, opening March 6. While not quite life-size, the 4.5-foot drop is nothing to scoff at, especially if you're looking through the eyes of a minifigure.

Inspired by El Toro, a wooden coaster at New Jersey's Six Flags Great Adventure, the detailed structure took nearly 800 hours to build. The feat of LEGO engineering is made of almost 90,000 pieces and features a total of 85 feet of track. The whole design measures more than 21 feet long and almost 4 feet wide.

To get an idea of just how impressive the toy coaster is, check out the videos below. You can also scroll through these photos for a look at the detailed features built around the ride, including landscaping work, crowds of visitors, and other, smaller amusement park rides.

If you like this LEGO creation, you might want to check out Chairudo's previous works, like the detailed amusement park that's currently on display alongside the coaster in Prague.

[h/t Gizmodo]

Scientists Reveal the Most Comprehensive Map of Butterfly Evolution Ever—and It's Gorgeous

Espeland et al., Current Biology (2018)
Espeland et al., Current Biology (2018)

There are 18,000 known butterfly species in the world, so maybe it’s not surprising that scientists haven’t quite worked out how they’re all related. Recently, scientists developed what is currently the most comprehensive roadmap of butterfly evolution ever, one that includes 35 times more genetic data and three times as many classifications as past butterfly evolutionary trees. Oh, and as Fast Company found, it’s beautiful.

The study, published in Current Biology, drew on genetic data from 207 butterfly species that together represent 98 percent of butterfly tribes (the classification just above genus). Led by Florida Museum of Natural History curator Akito Kawahara and Marianne Espeland of the Alexander Koenig Research Museum in Germany, the study used this genetic data and the fossil record to trace the evolution of different butterfly species and figure out when different species split off from their cousins.

A circular visualization of the butterfly family tree
Espeland et al., Current Biology (2018)

Needless to say, millions years of evolution means a lot of information to visualize in one family tree. Each bold label on the very outside of the circle represents a tribe, like Tagiadini, followed by the individual species that made it into the study, like Tagiades flesus (the clouded skipper). Species are clumped together by subgroup—in this case, Pyrginae (spread-winged skippers)—and color-coordinated by family—in this case, Hesperiidae (skippers).

The solid gray circle near the center, labeled K-PG boundary (for Cretaceous–Paleogene boundary) represents the mass extinction event that killed off most of Earth’s plant and animal species, including the dinosaurs.

A close-up of a circular visualization of the butterfly family tree
Espeland et al., Current Biology (2018)

The study confirms several pieces of information that butterfly experts had hypothesized about in previous studies, while overturning other hypotheses. Butterflies can be divided into seven different families, and though previous research estimated that the first butterflies appeared around 100 million years ago, this study pushes that date back to around 120 million years ago. But there were just a few early ancestors of butterflies prior to the mass extinction event that wiped out the dinosaurs, after which the butterfly family tree explodes into different branches.

Swallowtail butterflies (the subfamily Papilioninae, to the left in blue) were the first butterfly family to branch off, so they’re a “sister” species to all other butterfly species. Skippers (the family Hesperiidae, in purple) likely branched off next, then nocturnal butterflies like the Hedylidae family (in gray). However, some species that scientists previously thought were sister groups do not, in fact, share common ancestry, including swallowtails, birdwings, zebra swallowtails, and swordtails. The timeline shows that some butterfly species seem to have evolved together along with the plants they feed on or, in some cases, ant species with which they now have a mutually beneficial relationship.

[h/t Fast Company]

The World’s First Film Poster Is Up for Auction in London

Sotheby's
Sotheby's

Cinephiles, get your wallets out. Historic posters for some of the world’s most famous films are going up for sale as part of an upcoming auction at Sotheby’s London, including a rare promotional poster designed for the first-ever film screening, The Guardian reports.

The “Original Film Posters Online” auction is your chance to own a Henri Brispot-designed Cinématographe Lumière poster, advertising the first admission-based public film screening. The Lumière brothers’ December 1895 event at a Paris salon lasted approximately 20 minutes, showing off a number of the brothers’ short films using their specially made camera-projector, the cinématographe. The poster is worth an estimated $60,000 to $77,000.

A poster titled Cinema Lumiére shows an illustration of patrons milling around a cafe.
Lot 44 Cinématographe Lumière (1896) poster, French (est. £40,000-60,000)
Sotheby's

The auction also includes original posters for movies like Breakfast at Tiffany’s, Star Wars, 2001: A Space Odyssey, several James Bond movies, and King Kong. The array features signed posters, painted advertisements for silent-era films, and concept art, ranging in price from around $650 to almost $77,000. The Lumière brothers poster is the most valuable lot on offer.

The bidding opens on August 28. You can see all the items up for auction here or on display in London throughout this month.

[h/t The Guardian]

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