Flickr user Larry Myhre
Flickr user Larry Myhre

15 Creative Converted School Buses

Flickr user Larry Myhre
Flickr user Larry Myhre

School buses are nostalgic for many people. They’re the wild and wonderful social scene that bookmarks the school day. They’re iconic in shape and color, and they have a certain smell that takes former schoolchildren back. But they eventually become too old or outdated to carry kids safely.

What happens to all those retired school buses? They’re the guest room out behind Grandpa’s house. They’re a more colorful element of the street food scene. They’re mobile houses for wanderers who don’t actually want to leave home.

We picked out a few good ones, but there are many more. Let us know in the comments what you’d do with a retired school bus if you had one.

1. Rustic Bus

Photo courtesy Flickr user Johnny Vintage

This 1978 school bus is heated by a wood stove.

2. Cheesy Goodness

Photo courtesy of Flickr user CamKnows

A school bus in Oregon serves grilled cheese.

3. Art Bus

Photo courtesy of Flickr user 3CENT

An artist used this bus as a temporary studio.

4. Home Sweet Bus

Photo courtesy Justin Evidon

An architecture student made an amazingly efficient living space in an old school bus this past summer.

5. Party Bus

Photo Courtesy of Flickr user Manuel W.

Why tailgate when you can roof deck?

6. Lofty Ambitions

Photo courtesy of Tiny House Listings

This school bus from Dallas has a loft made out of cedar.

7. Steampunk Bus

Photo courtesy Jake von Slatt

A Victorian sensibility works well in this converted bus.

8. Oil Change

Photo courtesy of Tiny Home Listings

The headline on this one says it’s veggie oil ready. Well, then!

9. Literally

Photo courtesy of Flickr user Farrell Link

This school bus is now a mobile classroom for adult learners.

10. Cool Bus

Photo courtesy of Flickr user Bret and Robin

The owners of this bus can beat the heat with an air conditioner during the day, then hang out on the roof deck in the cool of the evening.

11. A Very Little Bus

Photo courtesy of Tiny House Listings

If you don’t want to drive a great behemoth of a bus, this one is barely bigger than an SUV.

12. Here Comes the Sun

Photo courtesy of Flickr user 350.org

This bus carried California schoolchildren until 2003. Now it’s used to educate the public about renewable energy.

13. Big as a Boat

Photo courtesy of Flickr user Larry Myhre

Bob Waldmire’s Road Yacht is now on display at the Route 66 Association’s Hall of Fame and Museum.

14. A New Spin on Food Trucks

Photo courtesy Flickr user Origimadon

This school bus in Vermont has become a restaurant-on-wheels.

15. Double Decker

Photo courtesy of Tiny House Listings

If you can’t decide between a Volkswagen camper van and a school bus, why not stick a couple Volkswagens on top of the school bus?

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The Best Way to Fight Sky-High Gas Prices This Summer
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Thanks to crude oil prices and increasing demand, it's getting very expensive to operate a motor vehicle in the U.S. In Connecticut and New York, gas prices have hit over $3 a gallon. According to AAA, the national average—which fluctuates on a daily basis—is hovering around $2.90. As a result, motorists might spend up to $200 more fueling up in 2018.

Whether that will translate into fewer people taking road trips this summer remains to be seen. But you don't necessarily have to be at the total mercy of Big Oil every time you pull up to the pump. While credit card programs and other discount offers can shave pennies off a refuel, it's what you do once you leave the station that has the greatest impact on fuel economy.

Automotive expert Ron Montoya of Edmunds, an online automotive information hub, spoke with NBC News recently and suggested that drivers can anticipate significant savings based on one simple rule: drive less aggressively.

Depending on the model, cars tend to maximize fuel economy around 50 miles per hour (mph). When a car joins the racing flow of traffic on a highway, accelerating from 55 mph to 75 mph, fuel consumption speeds up right along with it, shaving up to 15 miles per gallon (mpg) off the vehicle's fuel efficiency. Even going 65 mph will eat up four to eight mpg more. Overall, the act of threading through traffic by speeding, braking, and rapidly accelerating is responsible for a 15 to 30 percent reduction in gas mileage. It's like paying 20 cents more per gallon for every 5 mph driven over a cruising speed of 50 mph.

In addition to maintaining a moderate speed, road trippers may also want to consider leaving cargo off the roof—it increases drag—and sticking with regular unleaded. Most cars don't need premium, even if it's "recommended" on car doors. Only use more expensive fuel if the manufacturer labels it "required."

As for those credit card deals? They vary by issuer, but paying cash usually results in a 10 to 15 cent savings per gallon because gas stations don't have to cover transaction fees. If you don't normally carry a lot of cash, consider paying with a debit card—but make sure the station will treat it as cash, not credit.

[h/t NBC News]

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LinkedIn Now Lets You Search for Jobs by Commute Time
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A long commute can have a major effect on your health and happiness. Studies regularly find that the longer it takes for people to get to work, especially if they’re driving, the less satisfied they are with their lives in general, and polls suggest that many people would happily take a lower salary in exchange for a shorter ride to work. You can put that latter theory to the test with LinkedIn’s new job search tool, which lets you look for open positions based on potential commute times, according to Lifehacker.

The new “See Your Commute” feature on LinkedIn will let you enter your address to see how long it would take to get to the office in a particular job listing by car, public transit, or walking. It will also let you set your preferred commute time as a preference so that when you’re searching for openings, the results won’t include companies that would require a longer commute than you’re willing to undertake. You can set your commute preferences for between 15 and 120 minutes and factor in traffic based on what time you typically start your commute.

Screenshots of LinkedIn's mobile commute-search function
LinkedIn

How you get to the office every day (and how long it takes you) may be as relevant to your happiness at work as the job requirements or the size of the company. If a terrible commute can make you feel worse about your job, it makes sense to hunt for your new workplace based in part on how long it will take you to get there every day.

The feature seems to only be available on the LinkedIn mobile app for now. Test the feature yourself within LinkedIn’s job search portal here.

[h/t Lifehacker]

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