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Wayne Kerr
Wayne Kerr

15 Arts & Crafts Inspired by Breaking Bad

Wayne Kerr
Wayne Kerr

There’s only one episode of Breaking Bad left. In honor of one of the greatest TV dramas ever made, here’s a collection of crafts based on the show. (If this still doesn’t satisfy your finale fix though, don’t mix our collections of fan art and food inspired by Breaking Bad.)

Warning: There may be some spoilers ahead, but only from past seasons.

1. Say My Name

Michelle Coffee created these adorable plush Walter Whites for the Breaking Bad Art Project show at LA’s Gallery 1988. She has Walt when he first started cooking, after he first took on his Heisenberg persona and after he broke his nose when he intentionally got in a car accident in the hopes of stopping Hank’s investigation.

2. I’m In The Cute-pire Business

Whether you prefer Walt in his briefs or his Heisenberg ensemble, you’re sure to be happy whenever you cuddle up with Etsy seller cyberscribe’s adorable little Walter White dolls.

3. Yo, Cuddle Me…Bitch

For those who would prefer to cuddle with Jesse Pinkman, DeviantArt user DewHeart85 has you covered with this cute plush toy, complete with his own tiny bag of Blue Sky.

4. Yeah Science!

The best thing about Allison Hoffman’s adorable amigurumi Walt and Jesse plushes is that you can actually put them in (and take them out of) their crocheted hazmat suits. Plus, they even have accessories like a bag of drugs and Walt’s hat and glasses.

5. Breaking Bear

There are a lot of Breaking Bad crafts out there these days, but few come close to being as cute as Etsy seller RedCapStore’s amigurumi version of the pink teddy bear from season two.

6. Home Is Where the Meth Is

There’s nothing like a pleasant cross-stitch to brighten up your wall and make your place feel homey—especially when it’s a piece of Breaking Bad fan art. For those who don’t remember the scene referenced in this delightful creation by Wayne Kerr, here’s a link to the video. If you want to make your own “private domicile” cross-stitch, you can get a pattern from Etsy seller OhSewNerdy, but, be warned, it doesn’t have the delightful use of the word “bitch” on it.

7. Evil, Thy Name Is Heisenberg

Not a big fan of motorhomes, but still want a great Breaking Bad cross-stitch of your own? Then head over to Etsy seller togglestitch’s shop and grab this great pattern reminding people to remember the name Heisenberg.

8. Wanna Cook?

For those who prefer more classic cross-stitch themes, this “Kiss the Cook” design with Walter’s face is truly magnificent. DeviantArt user Angie Jane did a fantastic job getting so much detail into Mr. White’s face in such a small space.

9. Afghan Bad

It takes a Breaking Bad super-fan to recognize this crochet pattern as a tribute to the show; Skyler and Walt have an afghan just like this one in their living room. If you want to make your own, you can follow the pattern Sarah London created for it.

That’s not the only afghan in the show either. One of the famous scenes of Walt and Jesse sitting down for a beer after cooking up a batch also has an afghan prominently placed in the background. If you prefer to make that one, The Batter’s Box has the guide.

10. I Am The One That Protects The Furniture

Here’s a craft that everyone can do at home. Just grab a set of Perler Beads, a peg board and an iron and you’re all ready to follow Rebecca Lowrey Boyd’s instructions to create your own Breaking Bad coasters.

11. Hello Heisenberg

It is a whole lot harder to resist Heisenberg when he is also half-Hello Kitty. DeviantArt user UniqueT may have just created the cutest villain in all of history.

12. I Am The Danger

Joshua Lumitao knows how to make a seriously scary jack-o-lantern. Fortunately, it will only creep out the older kids and adults who come trick-or-treating, as they’ll be the only ones who recognize how horrifying Heisenberg is.

13. Heisenpot

Etsy seller GingerPots’ Heisenberg planter is the perfect place to grow your new lily of the valley or castor bean plants. Just be sure to keep them away from children or you might feel the rage of Jesse Pinkman.

14. Tread Lightly

The cracked blue meth design in these custom Vans slip-ons by Off the Wall Art really puts them on a level all their own. Best of all, you can even order a custom pair of your own from their Facebook Page.

15. Keeping It Real (Awesome)

Jon Defreest might just have the coolest Breaking Bad craft story ever. It all started when he came up with a cool design for Breaking Bad Converse that he posted online. Not long after, Bryan Cranston’s personal assistant got in touch with the artist, letting him know that Bryan wanted a pair of the shoes for himself.

While the shoes were originally just a Photoshop design, Defreest immediately set about getting the shoes printed and sent a pair to Bryan, who then called him to thank him, sent a few goodies in return, and invited the artist to come visit the set of the show. While he was getting a great behind-the-scenes experience, Aaron Paul approached Defreest and told him that he also wanted a pair of the shoes.

Afterwards, Bryan Cranston wore the shoes to the IFC Independent Spirit Awards and Aaron Paul carried a pair with him to show off at the SAG Awards. Defreest expressed his gratitude by saying, “In a situation that could have ended with a cease and desist, I have been consistently treated like a friend of the show. I couldn't have asked for a better experience as both an artist and a fan.”

Note: I am aware that shoe designs that start off as Photoshop images might not technically be considered a “craft,” but with a story this cool, it’s hard to resist sharing.

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iStock
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The Simple Optical Illusion That Makes an Image Look Like It's Drawing Itself
iStock
iStock

Artist James Nolan Gandy invents robot arms that sketch intricate mathematical shapes with pen and paper. When viewed in real time, the effect is impressive. But it becomes even more so when the videos are sped up in a timelapse. If you look closely in the video below, the illustration appears to materialize faster than the robot can put the design to paper. Gizmodo recently explained how the illusion works to make it look like parts of the sketch are forming before the machine has time to draw them.

The optical illusion isn’t an example of tricky image editing: It’s the result of something called the wagon wheel effect. You can observe this in a car wheel accelerating down the highway or in propeller blades lifting up a helicopter. If an object makes enough rotations per second, it can appear to slow down, move backwards, or even stand still.

This is especially apparent on film. Every “moving image” we see on a screen is an illusion caused by the brain filling in the gaps between a sequence of still images. In the case of the timelapse video below, the camera captured the right amount of images, in the right order, to depict the pen as moving more slowly than it did in real life. But unlike the pen, the drawing formed throughout the video isn't subject to the wagon-wheel effect, so it still appears to move at full speed. This difference makes it look like the sketch is drawing itself, no pen required.

Gandy frequently shares behind-the-scenes videos of his mechanical art on his Instagram page. You can check out some of his non-timelapse clips like the one below to better understand how his machines work, then visit his website to browse and purchase the art made by his 'bots.

And if you think his stuff is impressive, make sure to explore some of the incredible art robots have made in the past.

[h/t Gizmodo]

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Tessa Angus
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Surprising Sculptures Made From Fallen Feathers
Kate MccGwire, Orchis, 2012
Kate MccGwire, Orchis, 2012
Tessa Angus

Kate MccGwire is a British sculptor with an unusual medium: feathers. Her surreal, undulating works often take the form of installations—the feathers spilling out of a drain, a stove, a crypt wall—or stand-alone sculptures in which antique bell jars, cabinets, or trunks contain otherworldly shapes.

MccGwire developed her obsession with feathers after moving to a studio barge on the Thames in 2006, as she explains in a video from Crane.tv recently spotlighted by Boing Boing. The barge was near a large shed full of feral pigeons, whose feathers she would spot on her way to work. "I started picking them up and laying them out, collecting them," she remembers. "And after about two weeks I had like 300 feathers." At the time, concerns about bird flu were rife, which made the feathers seem "dangerous as well as beautiful."

When not supplied by her own next-door menagerie, the feathers for her artwork come from a network of racing pigeon societies all over the UK, who send her envelopes full every time the birds molt. Farmers and gamekeepers also send her fallen feathers from birds such as magpies, pheasants, and roosters.

The cultural associations around birds are a big part of what inspires MccGwire. “The dove is the symbol of peace, purity, and fertility," she told ArtNews in 2013, "but it’s exactly the same species as a pigeon—which everyone regards as being dirty, foul, a pest.”

The same duality is present in her own work, which she frequently shares on her Instagram account. “I want to seduce by what I do—but revolt in equal measure. It’s really important to me that you’ve got that rejection of things you think you know for sure.”

You can see some pictures of MccGwire's work, and watch the video from Crane.tv, below.

Kate MccGwire's installation "Evacuate"
Evacuate, 2010
J Wilde

Kate MccGwire's sculpture "Convolous"
Convolous, 2015
JP Bland

Kate MccGwire's installation "Gyre"
Gyre, 2012
Tessa Angus

Kate MccGwire's sculpture "Gag"
Gag, 2009
JP Bland

Kate MccGwire's sculpture "Writhe"
Writhe, 2010
Tessa Angus

Kate MccGwire's sculpture "Quell"
Quell, 2011
Tessa Angus

Kate MccGwire's sculpture "Taunt"
Taunt, 2012
Tessa Angus

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