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Wayne Kerr
Wayne Kerr

15 Arts & Crafts Inspired by Breaking Bad

Wayne Kerr
Wayne Kerr

There’s only one episode of Breaking Bad left. In honor of one of the greatest TV dramas ever made, here’s a collection of crafts based on the show. (If this still doesn’t satisfy your finale fix though, don’t mix our collections of fan art and food inspired by Breaking Bad.)

Warning: There may be some spoilers ahead, but only from past seasons.

1. Say My Name

Michelle Coffee created these adorable plush Walter Whites for the Breaking Bad Art Project show at LA’s Gallery 1988. She has Walt when he first started cooking, after he first took on his Heisenberg persona and after he broke his nose when he intentionally got in a car accident in the hopes of stopping Hank’s investigation.

2. I’m In The Cute-pire Business

Whether you prefer Walt in his briefs or his Heisenberg ensemble, you’re sure to be happy whenever you cuddle up with Etsy seller cyberscribe’s adorable little Walter White dolls.

3. Yo, Cuddle Me…Bitch

For those who would prefer to cuddle with Jesse Pinkman, DeviantArt user DewHeart85 has you covered with this cute plush toy, complete with his own tiny bag of Blue Sky.

4. Yeah Science!

The best thing about Allison Hoffman’s adorable amigurumi Walt and Jesse plushes is that you can actually put them in (and take them out of) their crocheted hazmat suits. Plus, they even have accessories like a bag of drugs and Walt’s hat and glasses.

5. Breaking Bear

There are a lot of Breaking Bad crafts out there these days, but few come close to being as cute as Etsy seller RedCapStore’s amigurumi version of the pink teddy bear from season two.

6. Home Is Where the Meth Is

There’s nothing like a pleasant cross-stitch to brighten up your wall and make your place feel homey—especially when it’s a piece of Breaking Bad fan art. For those who don’t remember the scene referenced in this delightful creation by Wayne Kerr, here’s a link to the video. If you want to make your own “private domicile” cross-stitch, you can get a pattern from Etsy seller OhSewNerdy, but, be warned, it doesn’t have the delightful use of the word “bitch” on it.

7. Evil, Thy Name Is Heisenberg

Not a big fan of motorhomes, but still want a great Breaking Bad cross-stitch of your own? Then head over to Etsy seller togglestitch’s shop and grab this great pattern reminding people to remember the name Heisenberg.

8. Wanna Cook?

For those who prefer more classic cross-stitch themes, this “Kiss the Cook” design with Walter’s face is truly magnificent. DeviantArt user Angie Jane did a fantastic job getting so much detail into Mr. White’s face in such a small space.

9. Afghan Bad

It takes a Breaking Bad super-fan to recognize this crochet pattern as a tribute to the show; Skyler and Walt have an afghan just like this one in their living room. If you want to make your own, you can follow the pattern Sarah London created for it.

That’s not the only afghan in the show either. One of the famous scenes of Walt and Jesse sitting down for a beer after cooking up a batch also has an afghan prominently placed in the background. If you prefer to make that one, The Batter’s Box has the guide.

10. I Am The One That Protects The Furniture

Here’s a craft that everyone can do at home. Just grab a set of Perler Beads, a peg board and an iron and you’re all ready to follow Rebecca Lowrey Boyd’s instructions to create your own Breaking Bad coasters.

11. Hello Heisenberg

It is a whole lot harder to resist Heisenberg when he is also half-Hello Kitty. DeviantArt user UniqueT may have just created the cutest villain in all of history.

12. I Am The Danger

Joshua Lumitao knows how to make a seriously scary jack-o-lantern. Fortunately, it will only creep out the older kids and adults who come trick-or-treating, as they’ll be the only ones who recognize how horrifying Heisenberg is.

13. Heisenpot

Etsy seller GingerPots’ Heisenberg planter is the perfect place to grow your new lily of the valley or castor bean plants. Just be sure to keep them away from children or you might feel the rage of Jesse Pinkman.

14. Tread Lightly

The cracked blue meth design in these custom Vans slip-ons by Off the Wall Art really puts them on a level all their own. Best of all, you can even order a custom pair of your own from their Facebook Page.

15. Keeping It Real (Awesome)

Jon Defreest might just have the coolest Breaking Bad craft story ever. It all started when he came up with a cool design for Breaking Bad Converse that he posted online. Not long after, Bryan Cranston’s personal assistant got in touch with the artist, letting him know that Bryan wanted a pair of the shoes for himself.

While the shoes were originally just a Photoshop design, Defreest immediately set about getting the shoes printed and sent a pair to Bryan, who then called him to thank him, sent a few goodies in return, and invited the artist to come visit the set of the show. While he was getting a great behind-the-scenes experience, Aaron Paul approached Defreest and told him that he also wanted a pair of the shoes.

Afterwards, Bryan Cranston wore the shoes to the IFC Independent Spirit Awards and Aaron Paul carried a pair with him to show off at the SAG Awards. Defreest expressed his gratitude by saying, “In a situation that could have ended with a cease and desist, I have been consistently treated like a friend of the show. I couldn't have asked for a better experience as both an artist and a fan.”

Note: I am aware that shoe designs that start off as Photoshop images might not technically be considered a “craft,” but with a story this cool, it’s hard to resist sharing.

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USPS Is Issuing Its First Scratch-and-Sniff Stamps This Summer
USPS
USPS

Summertime smells like sunscreen, barbecues, and—starting June 20, 2018—postage stamps. That's when the United States Postal Service debuts its first line of scratch-and-sniff stamps in Austin, Texas with perfumes meant to evoke "the sweet scent of summer."

The 10 stamps in the collection feature playful watercolor illustrations of popsicles by artist Margaret Berg. If the designs alone don't immediately transport you back to hot summer days spent chasing ice cream trucks, a few scratches and a whiff of the stamp should do the trick. If you're patient, you can also refrain from scratching and use them to mail a bit of summer nostalgia to your loved ones.

Since it was invented in the 1960s, scratch-and-sniff technology has been incorporated into photographs, posters, picture books, and countless kids' stickers.

The first-class mail "forever" stamps will be available in booklets of 20 for $10. You can preorder yours online before they're unveiled at the first-day-of-issue dedication ceremony at Austin's Thinkery children's museum next month.

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15 Things You Didn't Know About The Persistence Of Memory

Salvador Dalì's The Persistence of Memory is the eccentric Spanish painter's most recognizable work. You have probably committed its melting clocks to memory—but you may not know all that went into its making.

1. THE PERSISTENCE OF MEMORY WAS PAINTED IN THE MIDST OF A HALLUCINATION.

Around the time of the painting’s 1931 creation, Dalì perfected his "paranoiac-critical method." The artist would attempt to enter a meditative state of self-induced psychotic hallucinations so that he could make what he called "hand-painted dream photographs."

“I am the first to be surprised and often terrified by the images I see appear upon my canvas," Dalì wrote, referring to his unusual routine. "I register without choice and with all possible exactitude the dictates of my subconscious, my dreams.”

2. IT'S SMALLER THAN YOU MIGHT EXPECT.

The Persistence of Memory is one of Dalì's philosophical triumphs, but the actual oil-on-canvas painting measures only 9.5 inches by 13 inches.

3. THE PAINTING MADE THE 28-YEAR-OLD ARTIST FAMOUS.

Dalì began painting when he was 6 years old. As a young man, he flirted with fame, working with Spanish filmmaker Luis Buñuel on his groundbreaking shorts Un Chien Andalou and L'Age d'Or. But Dalì’s big break didn’t come until he created his signature surrealist work. The press and the public went mad for him when The Persistence of Memory was shown at the Julien Levy Gallery in New York City in 1932.

4.THE PERSISTENCE OF MEMORY STAYED IN NEW YORK THANKS TO AN ANONYMOUS DONOR.

After its gallery show, a patron bought the piece and donated it to the Museum of Modern Art in 1934. It’s been a highlight of MoMA's collection for more than 80 years.

5. OTHER SURREALISTS PUT HIM ON TRIAL.

Though Dalì had become the most famous surrealist painter in the world, André Breton, the founder of surrealism, gave him the boot over concerns about Dalì’s alleged support of fascism. At his ousting from the Bureau for Surrealist Research, the loose network of surrealist artists and philosophers headed by Breton, Dalì declared, "I myself am surrealism."

6. EINSTEIN'S THEORIES MAY HAVE INFLUENCED DALÌ.

The Persistence of Memory has sparked considerable academic debate as scholars interpret the painting. Some critics believe the melting watches in the piece are a response to Albert Einstein's theory of relativity. In her book Dalì and Surrealism, critic Dawn Ades writes, "the soft watches are an unconscious symbol of the relativity of space and time."

7. DALÌ'S EXPLANATION WAS CHEESIER.

Dalì declared that his true muse for the deformed clocks was a wheel of Camembert cheese that had melted in the sun. As Dalì considered himself and his persona an extension of his work, the truthfulness of his response is also up for debate.

8. ITS LANDSCAPE COMES FROM DALÌ'S CHILDHOOD.

Dalì's native Catalonia had a major influence on his works. His family's summer house in the shade of Mount Pani (also known as Mount Panelo) inspired him to integrate its likeness into his paintings again and again, like in View of Cadaqués with Shadow of Mount Pani. In The Persistence of Memory, the shadow of Mount Pani drapes the foreground, while Cape Creus and its craggy coast lie in the background.

9. THE PAINTING HAS A SEQUEL (SORT OF).

In 1954, Dalì revisited the composition of The Persistence of Memory for a new work, The Disintegration of the Persistence of Memory. Alternately known as The Chromosome of a Highly-coloured Fish's Eye Starting the Harmonious Disintegration of the Persistence of Memory, the oil-on-canvas piece is believed to represent Dalì's prior work being broken down to its atomic elements.

10. BETWEEN PAINTING THESE TWO WORKS, DALÌ'S OBSESSIONS SHIFTED.

Though the subjects of The Persistence of Memory and The Disintegration of the Persistence of Memory are the same, their differences illustrated the shifts that took place between periods of Dalì's career. The first painting was created in the midst of his Freudian phase, when Dalì was fascinated by the dream analysis pioneered by Sigmund Freud. By the 1950s, when the latter was painted, Dalì's dark muse had become the science of the atomic age.

"In the surrealist period, I wanted to create the iconography of the interior world—the world of the marvelous, of my father Freud," Dalì explained. "I succeeded in doing it. Today the exterior world—that of physics—has transcended the one of psychology. My father today is [theoretical physicist] Dr. Heisenberg."

11. FREUD RECIPROCATED DALÌ'S ADMIRATION.

Sigmund Freud, the father of psychoanalysis, was not a fan of the surrealists, whom he felt were too conscious of the art they were making and didn't understand his theories. Dalì was the exception. When the two met in 1938, Dalì was giddily sketching a portrait of his 82-year-old idol when Freud whispered, "That boy looks like a fanatic." The comment delighted Dalì, as did Freud's suggestion that his The Metamorphosis of Narcissus would be of value to the study of psychoanalysis. Freud later said, "I have been inclined to regard the surrealists as complete fools, but that young Spaniard with his candid, fanatical eyes and his undeniable technical mastery, has changed my estimate."

12.THE PERSISTENCE OF MEMORY MAY BE A SELF-PORTRAIT.

The floppy profile at the painting's center might be meant to represent Dalì himself, as the artist was fond of self-portraits. Previously painted self-portraits include Self-Portrait in the Studio, Cubist Self-Portrait, Self-Portrait with "L' Humanité" and Self-Portrait (Figueres).

13. THERE WERE MORE MELTING CLOCKS TO COME.

In the 1970s, Dalì revisited his squishy timepieces in sculptures like Dance of Time I, II, & III; Nobility of Time, and Profile of Time. He also included them in lithographs.

14. THE PERSISTENCE OF MEMORY HAS ALIASES.

The masterpiece is also known as Soft Watches, Droopy Watches, The Persistence of Time, and Melting Clocks.

15. THE PAINTING HAS BECOME INGRAINED IN POP CULTURE.

The Persistence of Memory has been referenced on television in The Simpsons, Futurama, Hey Arnold, Doctor Who, and Sesame Street. Likewise, it's been alluded to in the animated movie Looney Tunes: Back in Action, in the comic strip The Far Side, and in videogames like EarthBound and Crash Bandicoot 2: N-Tranced. It was even parodied to mock the NFL’s DeflateGate scandal.

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