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Tama-chan

10 Delicious Examples of Sushi Art

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Tama-chan

In a classic sense, the "art of sushi" lies in the skill of making a delectable morsel that causes people to want more of your creations. But here we are talking about visual art, which you can enjoy on the internet, where communicating taste is still in the future. That itself comes in two kinds: sushi (or in some cases, onigiri, or rice balls) that look like something artful besides sushi, and other foods made to resemble sushi.

Panda

Sushi comes in several different styles. Makizushi is wrapped into a cylinder, then cut into slices, which opens the door for creative visuals. Making makizushi art requires rolling each component of the artwork in just the right part of the cylinder to ensure uniformity in the roll. Comedian runnyrunny gives a pretty clear demonstration on how to make a panda face sushi roll in this video (NSFW language). Meaghan M. posted a slightly simpler tutorial that uses added carrots for the eyes, as shown in the picture above.

If you prefer the whole panda, you might want to try this simple panda onigiri tutorial. Read it here in Japanese.

Battleship

Artist Mayuka Nakamura created this imperial warship for her graduate work at the Aichi Prefectural University of Fine Arts and Music. It is part of an 11-ship series, all made from rice, nori, and seafood.

Tank

This tank made of sushi is offered at the Kurisakiya restaurant in Oarai, Japan. It was created in honor of Japanese anime Girls und Panzer, which is set in the same town.

Star Wars Characters

Lydia McNabb made black and white rice balls into various Star Wars characters (Ewoks, Jawas, etc) with the addition of smoked salmon, nori, basil leaves, and other foods in the shapes that make them recognizable. The treats were for a Star Wars movie marathon she hosted.

Paintings

Tokyo sushi chef Tama-chan takes sushi art to a whole new level. His creations are so in demand that he run classes in sushi art. See photos of Tama-chan in action, as well as more of his creations.

Peeps Sushi

Photograph by Robin Lee.

So a skilled artist can make sushi look like whatever they want to. There is another facet of sushi art: making other foods that look like sushi. This is "Peepshi," made with marshmallow peeps. And it does contain rice -in the form of Rice Krispies marshmallow treats! The instructions for making them are at Serious Eats.

Sushi Cupcakes

Craftster member eggyolk put together Bento boxes of mini-cupcakes that look exactly like sushi. The rice you see is actually white sprinkles. Chopsticks and gummy fish added the finishing touch.

Waffle Sushi

The only thing that Waffle Breakfast Sushi has in common with traditional makizushi is the part in which they are both wrapped into a cylinder and then cut -but that's what makes it look like sushi. The ingredients are waffle, fruit, and cream cheese. Yum!

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Virginia Museum of Fine Arts to Launch Mobile Interactive Art Museum
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Since not everyone in America has easy access to first-class culture, the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts wants to bring it to them: As Smithsonian reports, the Richmond-based institution plans to launch an interactive mobile museum in fall 2018.

Called “VMFA on the Road,” the museum-on-wheels will visit rural schools, community centers, colleges, retirement homes, and small museums. At each stop, art lovers can enjoy lectures, distance learning opportunities, and rotating virtual reality tours of the museum's exhibitions.

The mobile museum is a modern offshoot of another VFMA initiative, the Artmobile, which was launched by the late architect and VMFA director Leslie Cheek Jr. From 1953 to 1994, the museum loaded tractor-trailers with works by artists like Monet, Rembrandt, and Picasso, and toured the state's remote areas to compensate for their lack of art institutions.

By the 1990s, the Artmobile program had swelled to include four high-tech Chevrolet tractor-trailers, each one laden with historic art treasures. Eventually, though, the VMFA discontinued its Artmobiles due to conservation and financial issues, including the challenges of protecting the artworks on the road.

As the Richmond Times-Dispatch reports, the VMFA's new traveling museum will be a specially designed, 53-foot Volvo tractor-trailer, paid for with corporate funds, foundation grants, and donations. It's been dubbed "Artmobile 2.0"—a fitting nickname for a high-tech take on a decades-old public service.

[h/t Smithsonian]

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Cephalopod Fossil Sketch in Australia Can Be Seen From Space

Australia is home to some of the most singular creatures alive today, but a new piece of outdoor art pays homage to an organism that last inhabited the continent 65 million years ago. As the Townsville Bulletin reports, an etching of a prehistoric ammonite has appeared in a barren field in Queensland.

Ammonites are the ancestors of the cephalopods that currently populate the world’s oceans. They had sharp beaks, dexterous tentacles, and spiraling shells that could grow more than 3 feet in diameter. The inland sea where the ammonites once thrived has since dried up, leaving only fossils as evidence of their existence. The newly plowed dirt mural acts as a larger-than-life reminder of the ancient animals.

To make a drawing big enough to be seen from space, mathematician David Kennedy plotted the image into a path consisting of more than 600 “way points.” Then, using a former World War II airfield as his canvas, the property’s owner Rob Ievers plowed the massive 1230-foot-by-820-foot artwork into the ground with his tractor.

The project was funded by Soil Science Australia, an organization that uses soil art to raise awareness of the importance of farming. The sketch doubles as a paleotourist attraction for the local area, which is home to Australia's "dinosaur trail" of museums and other fossil-related attractions. But to see the craftsmanship in all its glory, visitors will need to find a way to view it from above.

[h/t Townsville Bulletin]

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