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Wait, What Does the Fox Say?

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Over the weekend, my girlfriend sat me down in front of her laptop and said, “Watch this.” Because we are the least with-it millenials around, she’d only just discovered the already-viral-for-a-few-weeks video for “The Fox,” by a pair of Norwegian brothers that call themselves Ylvis. If you’re even less hip than us, you can watch the video now.

The central premise of the song is that, while most everyone learns early on that “dog goes woof/cat goes meow” and so on, Ylvis and a whole lot of other people have no idea what kind of sounds foxes make. When the video was over, I so badly wanted to push up my glasses and say, “Well, duh, everyone knows that foxes vocalize with…”

But I had nothing. I didn’t know what the fox said!

Fortunately, some people do, and they’ve recorded foxes making those sounds. Wired points us to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s Macaulay Library, which catalogs audio and video of thousands of species.

So, what does the fox say? Like other animals, foxes have a lot of different calls that they use for different situations.

There’s this:

And this:

And then there’s this:

Also, all these:

...none of which roll off the tongue as easily as “Gering-ding-ding-ding-ringerdingering.”

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A life of hunting zebras and raising young on the savanna isn’t half bad for a female hyena. Sadly, the same can’t be said for their male counterparts. As MinuteEarth explains, things take a downturn for the males of the species once they hit adolescence. No female in their pack will mate with them, a behavior scientists believe evolved to avoid inbreeding, so they head off in search of a different group to join. After dealing with vicious hazing from their new clan, they file in at the bottom of the rank and wait for other males above them to die so that they can slowly gain status.

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After watching the video below, head over here for more facts about hyenas.

[h/t MinuteEarth]

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[h/t The Kid Should See This]

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