CLOSE
Johnny Martini
Johnny Martini

19 Pieces of Bill Murray Fan Art

Johnny Martini
Johnny Martini

Today is Bill Murray’s 63rd birthday. In honor of the actor’s long and fantastic career, here's a look at some of his best roles as depicted by artistic fans.

1. Please Post Bills

Perhaps the best collection of art inspired by Bill Murray was at the Gallery 1988 “Please Post Bills” show, which exclusively featured art based on the actor. Here is one of the many great pieces from the show, Hero Design’s “Groundhog Day Info Graphic.” While the show has long since passed, you can still purchase one of the limited edition prints of this piece at the gallery’s website.

2. Bill-O-Rama

What’s better than a night at the Bowl-O-Rama? How about a night at a bowling alley filled with some of Mr. Murray’s best characters? Ian Glaubinger created this marvelous piece as his contribution to the Please Post Bills. I don’t know about you guys, but I would LOVE to go to this bowling alley.

3. No Tomorrow

What does a man look like when he lives the same day over and over again? Dave Perillo shows the slow progression of Phil Connors as the repetition wears on. Apparently, at one point he even gets a job as a groundskeeper at a golf club and on another day, he even tries to capture ghosts.

4. Slimed

While there were plenty of great moments in Ghostbusters, perhaps the most memorable scene to only feature Bill was the “he slimed me” line. Jason Edmiston captured that scene in perfect detail in his submission to the Please Post Bills show.

5. The Ghost Buster

What fan of the Ghostbusters wouldn’t want to read a pulp novel about Dr. Venkman, the Paranormal Detective? Adam Limbert’s fictional book cover was yet another great addition to the Please Post Bills show.

6. Aqua Zissou

Here is another of the artworks created for the Please Post Bills Show. This one, created by Graham Erwin, features the actor’s character from The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou floating in the ocean just hoping to catch the shark who killed his friend.

7. We’ll Start A Jazz Band

Please Post Bills isn’t the only art show with paintings of Bill Murray in the collection. Alice X. Zhang created this piece, based on a famous scene from Lost In Translation, for her solo, cinema-inspired “Moments” show at New York’s Bottleneck Gallery.

8. Pete Venkman

Similarly, Alex Leighton, aka Xander13, was part of a Gallery 1988 show when he created a work based on Bill Murray—but it wasn’t actually for the Please Post Bills. It was for their Three G’s show, which was focused on Ghostbusters, Goonies, and Gremlins. Here’s his take on a wooden version of Dr. Venkman, complete with that charming, handsome smile Dana Barrett experienced so many times.

9. Bill F-ing Murray

What’s better than an artistic rendition of Bill Murray? How about one with five Bill Murrays showing off some of his most beloved roles throughout his career? Jeff Victor’s “Bill F-ing Murray” demonstrates just how hilarious and talented the great actor is.

10. The New and Improved Venkman

Scott Fensterer completed this amazing work as a commission piece where he was asked to sculpt a replacement head for the Matty Collector Peter Venkman action figure. You can see the original version here so you can truly appreciate how much more realistic Fensterer’s version is.

11. Painting Peter

It’s hard to find any icon of geek culture that artist James Hance hasn’t covered, and Bill Murray is no exception. Here’s his take on the actor’s Ghostbusters character, simply titled “Peter.”

12. Dr. Venkman and Friends

For those who simply love the simplified, geometric styles of sixties pop art and the classic monsters and heroes of Ghostbusters, it’s practically impossible not to love this great image of Peter Venkman with Slimer and the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man by Johnny Martini.

13. Venkman the Munny

As popular as Urban Vinyl toys are these days, you haven’t really made it until someone has turned you into a custom figure. Here’s proof that Bill Murray is still at the top of his game, as evidenced by artist Jonathan Jourdenais.

14. Sad Venkman With Slimer

Brad Hill specializes in making adorable clay sculptures of famous pop culture characters. His take on Doctor Venkman is particularly cute in part because the statue looks sort of sad, even while standing on Slimer.

15. Back Off Man…

From ultra-realistic to adorably cartoony, Peter Venkman is always a delightful character in any form and it's hard to get any cuter than this particularly precious creation made by artist Kevin Bolk.

16. Zombie Bill

When Bill Murray started starring in many independent drama movies such as Broken Flowers and Lost in Translation after the turn of the millennium, many fans of his comedic works started wondering if the actor had turned his back on outrightly silly films and some questioned if he had lost his comedic chops altogether. His surprise cameo in Zombieland put an end to those concerns though, as the actor shambled around his mansion pretending to be a zombie so he could live a happy existence despite the whole apocalypse occurring outside. DeviantArt user 25thPixel’s tribute to this cameo speaks to the impact it made in the film and the actor’s career.

17. Drink If You Dare

Here’s another great take on Bill’s Zombieland cameo, this one in the form of a functional jug –though I don’t recommend you actually drink from Ron Free’s mug, after all, no one knows what the inside of zombie Bill Murray contains.

18. Steve Zissou

Nolan Harris’ caricature of Bill’s character from The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou is so perfect that you can almost imagine him ranting about blowing up a shark with dynamite.

19. The Bill of the Future

Why did DeviantArt user funkwood decide to depict Bill Murray as a cyborg car with guns ravaging the wastes of the future? Because it’s awesome, of course. Besides, if Zombieland taught us anything, it’s that Bill Murray will survive any apocalypse scenario in style.

nextArticle.image_alt|e
Dan Bell
arrow
Design
A Cartographer Is Mapping All of the UK’s National Parks, J.R.R. Tolkien-Style
Peak District National Park
Peak District National Park
Dan Bell

Cartographer Dan Bell makes national parks into fantasy lands. Bell, who lives near Lake District National Park in England, is currently on a mission to draw every national park in the UK in the style of the maps in J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings, Kottke.org reports.

The project began in September 2017, when Bell posted his own hand-drawn version of a Middle Earth map online. He received such a positive response that he decided to apply the fantasy style to real world locations. He has completed 11 out of the UK’s 15 parks so far. Once he finishes, he hopes to tackle the U.S. National Park system, too. (He already has Yellowstone National Park down.)

Bell has done various other maps in the same style, including ones for London and Game of Thrones’s Westeros, and he commissions, in case you have your own special locale that could use the Tolkien treatment. Check out a few of his park maps below.

A close-up of a map for Peak District National Park
Peak District National Park in central England
Dan Bell

A black-and-white illustration of Cairngorms National Park in the style of a 'Lord of the Rings' map.
Cairngorms National Park in Scotland
Dan Bell

A black-and-white illustration of Lake District National Park in the style of a 'Lord of the Rings' map.
Lake District National Park in England
Dan Bell

You can buy prints of the maps here.

[h/t Kottke.org]

All images by Dan Bell

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
arrow
Art
The Simple Optical Illusion That Makes an Image Look Like It's Drawing Itself
iStock
iStock

Artist James Nolan Gandy invents robot arms that sketch intricate mathematical shapes with pen and paper. When viewed in real time, the effect is impressive. But it becomes even more so when the videos are sped up in a timelapse. If you look closely in the video below, the illustration appears to materialize faster than the robot can put the design to paper. Gizmodo recently explained how the illusion works to make it look like parts of the sketch are forming before the machine has time to draw them.

The optical illusion isn’t an example of tricky image editing: It’s the result of something called the wagon wheel effect. You can observe this in a car wheel accelerating down the highway or in propeller blades lifting up a helicopter. If an object makes enough rotations per second, it can appear to slow down, move backwards, or even stand still.

This is especially apparent on film. Every “moving image” we see on a screen is an illusion caused by the brain filling in the gaps between a sequence of still images. In the case of the timelapse video below, the camera captured the right amount of images, in the right order, to depict the pen as moving more slowly than it did in real life. But unlike the pen, the drawing formed throughout the video isn't subject to the wagon-wheel effect, so it still appears to move at full speed. This difference makes it look like the sketch is drawing itself, no pen required.

Gandy frequently shares behind-the-scenes videos of his mechanical art on his Instagram page. You can check out some of his non-timelapse clips like the one below to better understand how his machines work, then visit his website to browse and purchase the art made by his 'bots.

And if you think his stuff is impressive, make sure to explore some of the incredible art robots have made in the past.

[h/t Gizmodo]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios