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Johnny Martini

19 Pieces of Bill Murray Fan Art

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Johnny Martini

Today is Bill Murray’s 63rd birthday. In honor of the actor’s long and fantastic career, here's a look at some of his best roles as depicted by artistic fans.

1. Please Post Bills

Perhaps the best collection of art inspired by Bill Murray was at the Gallery 1988 “Please Post Bills” show, which exclusively featured art based on the actor. Here is one of the many great pieces from the show, Hero Design’s “Groundhog Day Info Graphic.” While the show has long since passed, you can still purchase one of the limited edition prints of this piece at the gallery’s website.

2. Bill-O-Rama

What’s better than a night at the Bowl-O-Rama? How about a night at a bowling alley filled with some of Mr. Murray’s best characters? Ian Glaubinger created this marvelous piece as his contribution to the Please Post Bills. I don’t know about you guys, but I would LOVE to go to this bowling alley.

3. No Tomorrow

What does a man look like when he lives the same day over and over again? Dave Perillo shows the slow progression of Phil Connors as the repetition wears on. Apparently, at one point he even gets a job as a groundskeeper at a golf club and on another day, he even tries to capture ghosts.

4. Slimed

While there were plenty of great moments in Ghostbusters, perhaps the most memorable scene to only feature Bill was the “he slimed me” line. Jason Edmiston captured that scene in perfect detail in his submission to the Please Post Bills show.

5. The Ghost Buster

What fan of the Ghostbusters wouldn’t want to read a pulp novel about Dr. Venkman, the Paranormal Detective? Adam Limbert’s fictional book cover was yet another great addition to the Please Post Bills show.

6. Aqua Zissou

Here is another of the artworks created for the Please Post Bills Show. This one, created by Graham Erwin, features the actor’s character from The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou floating in the ocean just hoping to catch the shark who killed his friend.

7. We’ll Start A Jazz Band

Please Post Bills isn’t the only art show with paintings of Bill Murray in the collection. Alice X. Zhang created this piece, based on a famous scene from Lost In Translation, for her solo, cinema-inspired “Moments” show at New York’s Bottleneck Gallery.

8. Pete Venkman

Similarly, Alex Leighton, aka Xander13, was part of a Gallery 1988 show when he created a work based on Bill Murray—but it wasn’t actually for the Please Post Bills. It was for their Three G’s show, which was focused on Ghostbusters, Goonies, and Gremlins. Here’s his take on a wooden version of Dr. Venkman, complete with that charming, handsome smile Dana Barrett experienced so many times.

9. Bill F-ing Murray

What’s better than an artistic rendition of Bill Murray? How about one with five Bill Murrays showing off some of his most beloved roles throughout his career? Jeff Victor’s “Bill F-ing Murray” demonstrates just how hilarious and talented the great actor is.

10. The New and Improved Venkman

Scott Fensterer completed this amazing work as a commission piece where he was asked to sculpt a replacement head for the Matty Collector Peter Venkman action figure. You can see the original version here so you can truly appreciate how much more realistic Fensterer’s version is.

11. Painting Peter

It’s hard to find any icon of geek culture that artist James Hance hasn’t covered, and Bill Murray is no exception. Here’s his take on the actor’s Ghostbusters character, simply titled “Peter.”

12. Dr. Venkman and Friends

For those who simply love the simplified, geometric styles of sixties pop art and the classic monsters and heroes of Ghostbusters, it’s practically impossible not to love this great image of Peter Venkman with Slimer and the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man by Johnny Martini.

13. Venkman the Munny

As popular as Urban Vinyl toys are these days, you haven’t really made it until someone has turned you into a custom figure. Here’s proof that Bill Murray is still at the top of his game, as evidenced by artist Jonathan Jourdenais.

14. Sad Venkman With Slimer

Brad Hill specializes in making adorable clay sculptures of famous pop culture characters. His take on Doctor Venkman is particularly cute in part because the statue looks sort of sad, even while standing on Slimer.

15. Back Off Man…

From ultra-realistic to adorably cartoony, Peter Venkman is always a delightful character in any form and it's hard to get any cuter than this particularly precious creation made by artist Kevin Bolk.

16. Zombie Bill

When Bill Murray started starring in many independent drama movies such as Broken Flowers and Lost in Translation after the turn of the millennium, many fans of his comedic works started wondering if the actor had turned his back on outrightly silly films and some questioned if he had lost his comedic chops altogether. His surprise cameo in Zombieland put an end to those concerns though, as the actor shambled around his mansion pretending to be a zombie so he could live a happy existence despite the whole apocalypse occurring outside. DeviantArt user 25thPixel’s tribute to this cameo speaks to the impact it made in the film and the actor’s career.

17. Drink If You Dare

Here’s another great take on Bill’s Zombieland cameo, this one in the form of a functional jug –though I don’t recommend you actually drink from Ron Free’s mug, after all, no one knows what the inside of zombie Bill Murray contains.

18. Steve Zissou

Nolan Harris’ caricature of Bill’s character from The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou is so perfect that you can almost imagine him ranting about blowing up a shark with dynamite.

19. The Bill of the Future

Why did DeviantArt user funkwood decide to depict Bill Murray as a cyborg car with guns ravaging the wastes of the future? Because it’s awesome, of course. Besides, if Zombieland taught us anything, it’s that Bill Murray will survive any apocalypse scenario in style.

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Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain
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‘American Gothic’ Became Famous Because Many People Saw It as a Joke
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Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

In 1930, Iowan artist Grant Wood painted a simple portrait of a farmer and his wife (really his dentist and sister) standing solemnly in front of an all-American farmhouse. American Gothic has since inspired endless parodies and is regarded as one of the country’s most iconic works of art. But when it first came out, few people would have guessed it would become the classic it is today. Vox explains the painting’s unexpected path to fame in the latest installment of the new video series Overrated.

According to host Phil Edwards, American Gothic made a muted splash when it first hit the art scene. The work was awarded a third-place bronze medal in a contest at the Chicago Art Institute. When Wood sold the painting to the museum later on, he received just $300 for it. But the piece’s momentum didn’t stop there. It turned out that American Gothic’s debut at a time when urban and rural ideals were clashing helped it become the defining image of the era. The painting had something for everyone: Metropolitans like Gertrude Stein saw it as a satire of simple farm life in Middle America. Actual farmers and their families, on the other hand, welcomed it as celebration of their lifestyle and work ethic at a time when the Great Depression made it hard to take pride in anything.

Wood didn’t do much to clear up the work’s true meaning. He stated, "There is satire in it, but only as there is satire in any realistic statement. These are types of people I have known all my life. I tried to characterize them truthfully—to make them more like themselves than they were in actual life."

Rather than suffering from its ambiguity, American Gothic has been immortalized by it. The country has changed a lot in the past century, but the painting’s dual roles as a straight masterpiece and a format for skewering American culture still endure today.

Get the full story from Vox below.

[h/t Vox]

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“Dissension” by Tobias Rothe. Original image courtesy Fondazione Federico Zeri/Università di Bologna // CC-BY 3.0
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Get Your GIFs Ready for This International Public Domain GIF-Making Competition
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“Dissension” by Tobias Rothe. Original image courtesy Fondazione Federico Zeri/Università di Bologna // CC-BY 3.0

Excellent GIF-making skills can serve you beyond material for your clever tweets. Each year, a group of four digital libraries from across the world hosts GIF IT UP, a competition to find the best animated image sourced from public domain images from their archives.

The competition is sponsored by Europeana, the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA), New Zealand’s DigitalNZ, and the National Library of Australia’s Trove, all of which host millions of public domain works. The requirements are that the source material must be in the public domain, have a 'no known copyright restrictions' statement, or have a Creative Commons license that allows its reuse. The material must also come from one of the sponsored sources. Oh, and judging by the past winners, it helps if it’s a little whimsical.

The image above won the grand prize in 2015. And this was a runner-up in 2016:

via GIPHY

This year’s prizes haven’t been announced yet (although Europeana says there will be a new one for first-time GIF makers), but last year’s grand prize winner got their own Giphoscope, and runners-up got $20 gift cards. (Turns out, there’s not a lot of money in public domain art.)

Not an expert GIFer yet? You can always revisit the audio version of DPLA’s advanced GIF-making tutorial from last year.

The fourth-annual GIF IT UP contest opens to submissions October 1.

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