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15 Delicious Ways to Utilize Nutella

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In 1964, the Beatles kicked off the British Invasion by making their first American performance on The Ed Sullivan Show, Roald Dahl published "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory," and a tiny jar of hazelnut-flavored chocolate spread changed the dessert world forever.

Nutella, a sweetened hazelnut cocoa spread from Ferrero, debuted on April 20, 1964. Since then, it's evolved into a global phenomenon with a passionate fan base (as recently illustrated by the "Nutella riots" in France). The brand even has its very own holiday—World Nutella Day is celebrated February 5.

While many opt for the spoon-to-mouth Nutella experience (it's the most efficient method, after all), fans have uncovered dozens of unique ways to use the spread in the kitchen and beyond. In celebration of World Nutella Day, here are 15 of our favorites.

1. NUTELLA PIZZA

A Nutella pizza.
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It's not delivery, it's your new favorite dessert pizza. To make, just spread Nutella on top of baked pizza dough and add any toppings of your choice—strawberries, bananas, marshmallows, nuts, various drizzles. Bake for 5-10 minutes and top with powdered sugar.

2. NUTELLA COFFEE SWEETENER

Nutetlla toast with a cup of coffee.
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If the idea of caffeinated Nutella helps get you out of bed in the morning, this homemade creamer is easy to whip up in advance. Or, simply replace your regular sugar or sweetener with a small teaspoon of Nutella to stir into a fresh cup of coffee.

3. NUTELLA-COVERED BACON

Nutella-covered bacon.
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You've heard of chocolate-covered bacon, but adding the nutty kick of Nutella takes this treat up a notch. This salty-yet-sweet concoction is great for breakfast. Or dessert. Or appetizers.

4. NUTELLA ART

Nutella art on a plate.
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Can you find Nutella in the arts and crafts aisle? Not yet, but a quick look through the #NutellaArt hashtag on Instagram has us thinking someday that'll change. Fans are creating beautiful works of Nutella art—from the Mona Lisa to Pikachu—and we can't decide what's more impressive: the intricacy of the artwork or the self-control to leave Nutella on the plate.

5. NUTELLA SOAP

Wooden spoon full of Nutella.
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Nothing screams "clean" like soap made out of a sugary hazelnut spread, right? Apparently true fans don't care, and they've come up with their own recipes for "Nutella soap." But, spoiler alert—it's really just soap in a Nutella jar. Either way, we'll take it!

6. NUTELLA QUESADILLAS

Nutella and banana quesadillas.
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Since stuffed crepes are difficult to make at home, Nutella quesadillas are the next best thing. With a little Nutella, a tortilla, and your favorite toppings (sprinkles, bananas, whipped cream, the works) you can make a less authentic but just as delicious portable dessert.

7. NUTELLA S'MORES

Pile of s'mores.
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Step up your s'mores game with an alternative to chocolate bars—Nutella! The recipe is about as simple as you can get—spread Nutella on a graham cracker, toast a marshmallow, combine—but the unexpected flavor will win over any campfire crew.

8. NUTELLA HOT CHOCOLATE

Mug of hot chocolate.
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Give your hot chocolate a hazelnut makeover by swapping out those old powder packs. Instead, warm 3 tablespoons of Nutella and 1 1/3 cup of milk in a saucepan (or in the microwave). And if you want to spike it? A shot of peppermint schnapps or Bailey's will spice it right up.

9. NUTELLA CANDLES

While we don't condone setting your Nutella on fire, many fans have crafted ways to clean out the jars and make their own DIY, Nutella-branded candles. Don't trust yourself with DIY? You can buy ready-made Nutella candles on Etsy.

10. NUTELLA SNOW GLOBES

A snowglobe.
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If you want to show your brand loyalty while decorating for some seasonal cheer, Nutella snow globes allow you to create any wintry, glittery, chocolatey scene you'd like. This DIY guide can walk you through it.

11. NUTELLA JAR ICE CREAM DISH

Bowl of ice cream with hazelnuts.
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It can be so hard to get those last bits of Nutella out of the jar. But once you're down to the last serving, scoop some ice cream directly into the jar. The "topping" may be on the bottom of the jar, but by the time you've finished your dessert, the last remnants of Nutella will be cleared out.

12. NUTELLA RAVIOLI

Nutella ravioli.
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Your Italian nonna may cringe, but Nutella fans have gotten uber creative, whipping up their own "Nutella Ravioli." You can either stuff wonton wrappers with the hazelnut spread and top them with mint leaves and powdered sugar, or use crescent roll dough for the pastry pockets.

13. NUTELLA MARTINI

Nutella martini.
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A basic chocolate martini will no longer do once you've tried adding Nutella. This recipe calls for double the chocolate and hazelnut flavors, courtesy of Frangelico and Godiva Chocolate Liqueur in addition to a tablespoon of Nutella.

14. BOOZY NUTELLA MILKSHAKES

Nutella milkshake.
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Few things beat a boozy milkshake, especially when Nutella is the core ingredient. This Nutella milkshake recipe calls for vodka, milk, vanilla ice cream, whipped cream and a healthy scoop of Nutella.

15. NUTELLA PIGGY BANK

Need a cute place to store your laundry quarters or stash those pennies that you never spend? Wash out an empty Nutella jar, use an X-Acto knife to slice a small rectangular slot in the lid, and enjoy saving up for another jar of your favorite hazelnut spread.

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The Simple Way to Reheat Your French Fries and Not Have Them Turn Into a Soggy Mess
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Some restaurant dishes are made to be doggy-bagged and reheated in the microwave the next day. Not French fries: The more crispy and delectable they are when they first arrive on your table, the more of a soggy disappointment they’ll be when you try to revive them at home. But as The Kitchn recently shared, there’s a secret to making leftover fries you’ll actually enjoy eating.

The key is to avoid the microwave altogether. Much of the appeal of fries comes from their crunchy, golden-brown exterior and their creamy potato center. This texture contrast is achieved by deep-frying, and all it takes is a few rotations around a microwave to melt it away. As the fries heat up, they create moisture, transforming all those lovely crispy parts into a flabby mess.

If you want your fries to maintain their crunch, you need to recreate the conditions they were cooked in initially. Set a large pan filled with about 2 tablespoons of oil for every 1 cup of fries you want to cook over medium-high heat. When you see the oil start to shimmer, add the fries in a single layer. After about a minute, flip them over and allow them to cook for half a minute to a minute longer.

By heating up fries with oil in a skillet, you produce something called the Maillard Reaction: This happens when high heat transforms proteins and sugars in food, creating the browning effect that gives fried foods their sought-after color, texture, and taste.

After your fries are nice and crisp, pull them out of the pan with tongs or a spatula, set them on a paper towel to absorb excess oil, and sprinkle them with salt. Now all you need is a perfect burger to feel like you’re eating a restaurant-quality meal at home.

[h/t The Kitchn]

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toyohara, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0 (cropped)
Meet Japan's Original (Not-so-Fresh) Form of Sushi, 'Funazushi'
toyohara, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0 (cropped)
toyohara, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0 (cropped)

When it comes to sushi, fresh is usually best. Most of the sushi we eat in America is haya-nare, which involves raw seafood and vinegared rice. But in Japan, there's an older form of sushi—said to be the original form—called funazushi. It's made from fermented carp sourced from one particular place, Lake Biwa, and takes about three years to produce from start to finish. The salt it's cured with keeps the bad bacteria at bay, and the result is said to taste like a fish version of prosciutto. Great Big Story recently caught up with Mariko Kitamura, the 18th generation to run her family’s shop in Takashima City, where she's one of the very few people left producing funazushi. You can learn more about the process behind the delicacy, and about Kitamura, in the video below.

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