Scottish Supermarket Fires Robot Employee for Scaring Customers

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iStock

Fear not, grocery clerks: Robots probably aren't going to be coming for your jobs anytime soon, judging from one machine's abrupt hire-and-fire in Edinburgh, Scotland. According to the Daily Record, Fabio, the shopbot robot, was canned after just one week on the job because he wasn't clicking with human patrons.

Fabio was recruited to work at Scottish supermarket Margiotta's flagship store as part of the BBC's Six Robots & Us, a TV program/experiment designed to gauge how useful humans find robots. The bot was programed to greet customers with hugs and flattery ("Hello, gorgeous") and guide them to various products.

Ultimately, though, Fabio lacked both the personality and nuance of a real-life employee. Background noise hampered his ability to understand specific requests, and at times his directions were correct but unhelpful; when asked where the beer was, for example, he'd reply, "It's in the alcohol section." His sales abilities were also lacking: When providing patrons with pulled pork samples, Fabio handed out samples to two patrons every 15 minutes, whereas his human colleagues managed to charm 12 customers into accepting the freebies.

Margiotta's owners thought that Fabio would enhance visitors' in-store experience, but they soon noted that they were actually avoiding the 'bot. They eventually caved, and informed the robot that his services would no longer be needed.

Shoppers may have felt relieved over Fabio's abrupt retirement, but staffers reportedly mourned his loss: While packing the machine up, one clerk actually began crying. They'd grown fond of him, plus he'd helped them dodge redundant requests from patrons—even if he wasn't so great at helping the actual customers themselves.

[h/t Daily Record]

Aquarium Points Out Anatomical Error in Apple's Squid Emoji

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iStock.com

When an inaccurate image makes it into Apple's emoji keyboard, the backlash is usually swift. But the squid emoji had been around for more than two years before the Monterey Bay Aquarium pointed out a major anatomical error on Twitter. As The Verge reports, the emoji depicts a squid with a siphon on its face—not on the back of its head, where it should be.

The Monterey Bay Aquarium dragged Apple for the misstep on Wednesday, December 5. "Not even squidding the siphon should be behind the head," the aquarium tweeted, "rn it just looks like a weirdo nose."

A squid's siphon serves some vital purposes. It pumps water over the gills, allowing it to breathe, and it blasts water away when the squid needs to propel through the sea. It's also the orifice out of which waste is expelled, making its placement right between the eyes in the emoji version especially unfortunate.

Emojis have incited outrage from marine biology experts in the past. When the Unicode Consortium released an early design of its lobster emoji earlier this year, people were quick to point out that it was missing a set of legs. Luckily the situation was rectified in time for the emoji's official release.

Apple has been known to revise designs to appease the public, but getting the squid's siphon moved to the other side of its head may be a long shot: Until the most recent backlash, the emoji had existed controversy-free since 2016.

[h/t The Verge]

The 10 Best Apps of 2018, According to Google

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iStock.com/hocus-focus

One common complaint about the YouTube app is that you need a premium membership to keep listening to audio after you've closed out of the app. Despite this inconvenience, the free version of the YouTube app is still wildly popular. After all, it’s the most downloaded iPhone app of 2018, according to CNN’s analysis of Apple data, and the company’s cable-free YouTube TV app is also this year’s “fan favorite” among Android users.

Apple’s list of the most downloaded apps of the year and Google’s picks for the best Android apps of 2018 paint a pretty clear picture of how we’ve been spending (or wasting) our time. And it’s clear that we can’t get enough of social media. After YouTube, the top downloaded free iPhone apps are Instagram, Snapchat, Messenger, and Facebook.

Avatar-creating app Bitmoji, which was the most downloaded app last year, dropped to sixth place in the latest ranking. Snapchat, which owns Bitmoji, also dropped one spot from last year. The social media app reportedly lost 3 million users last summer after an unpopular redesign.

Two photo editing tools—Facetune and Kirakira+—are this year’s most popular paid apps, while Fortnite is the most popular game.

Some of Google’s picks for the best Android apps, on the other hand, are less widely known. Take, for instance, the language-learning app Drops—its top recommendation. The Duolingo competitor offers lessons in 31 languages, including two Spanish variations (Castilian and Latin-American), Cantonese, Arabic, and even native Hawaiian.

Here are a few other apps that Google recommends, many of which are also available for iOS:

1. Vimage: Add animations to photos
2. Scout FM: Listen to podcasts
3. Slowly: Send “snail mail” to pen pals around the world
4. Luci: Keep track of lucid dreams
5. Mimo: Learn to write code
6. MasterClass: Learn how to cook, act, and more
7. Just a Line: Draw with augmented reality
8. 10% Happier: Learn to meditate
9. Notion: Track your productivity
10. Sift: Shop smarter and get refunds when prices drop

[h/t CNN]

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