Conelrad.com
Conelrad.com

4 Atomic-Themed 1950s Beauty Queens

Conelrad.com
Conelrad.com

During the 1950s, the American people suffered from a severe case of Atomic Fever. With the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the establishment of a permanent atomic test site in the Nevada desert, the U.S. had firmly positioned itself as leader in the atomic game. As a result, we simply went crazy for all things atomic. And sometimes our fervor showed up in some pretty strange places.

Ad men and designers were quick to jump on the atomic bandwagon, and incorporated the atomic motif in everything from children’s toys—the Gilbert Atomic Energy Lab set, with real radioactive materials, being a prime example—to hairstyles and lamps designed to look like mushroom clouds.

Nowhere was Atomic Fever more prevalent than Las Vegas. A mere 65 miles southeast of the Nevada Test Site, where more than 1000 nuclear devices were detonated between 1951 and 1992, Las Vegas was quick to cash in on its proximity. Bars, restaurants, hotels—essentially anywhere with a roof and a view—hosted atomic blast viewing parties on their roofs, often offering complimentary sunglasses and sunshades to their blast-viewing patrons.

As far as we can tell, there were four separate showgirl-turned-beauty-queens. Despite popular belief, there was no single Miss Atomic Bomb beauty pageant, and most of the queens were simply showgirls chosen for their radiant (ha!) looks. Each of the queens came about in an only loosely related manner: atomic-themed, usually of the mushroom cloud variety, costumes.

1. Miss Atomic Bomb

Miss Atomic Bomb is the most familiar and famous of the atomic queens, and it seems the only one crowned specifically as a marketing device for atomic testing. Apparently Don English, a Las Vegas News Bureau photographer, was amusing himself during a delay in a photo-shoot and created an atomic bomb-shaped appliqué that was attached to a beautiful girl’s swimsuit, and she was photographed as Miss Atomic Bomb (above). This beautiful girl was a Copa Girl, Miss Lee Merlin, who has entered history with her iconic photograph splashed in places of all sorts (including the latest The Killers album, Miss Atomic Bomb) for nearly 60 years.

2. Miss Atomic Blast

El Rancho Vegas held one of the earliest atomic blast picnics in 1952. Their picnic had an accompanying beauty pageant, which was won by Candyce King, a showgirl at the Last Frontier Hotel. King apparently donned an atomic bomb style hairdo that required a toilet paper roll and two cans of hairspray for support.

In addition to the normal beauty queen trappings, King was presented with a ten pound bag of mushrooms (because you know, mushroom cloud) by the Pennsylvania Mushroom Growers Association. King, as Miss Atomic Blast, had the honor of lighting the Stardust’s iconic mushroom-cloud-meets-falling-atomic-stars sign for the first time.

3. Miss Cue

Operation Cue took place at the Nevada Test Site in 1955. This series of tests was designed to test how well suburbia and all its trappings survived an atomic bomb blast. This was a large, intricate series of tests, and weather was unpredictable. After a series of delays, the operation came to be known as “Operation Mis-Cue.”

During one of the delays, military personnel headed into Las Vegas to pass the time. Six soldiers apparently crowned a Copa Girl named Linda Lawson as Miss Cue using a tiara constructed in the shape of a mushroom cloud, and supposedly made by the servicemen from wire and cotton bunting. The Sands went on to use photographs from this event as atomic publicity shots.

4. Miss A-Bomb

In 1953, the North Las Vegas Chamber of Commerce chose “Atomic City” as the theme of the annual parade and beauty pageant. Paula Harris won the pageant and rode on the chamber of commerce’s float, which bore a sign likening the city’s modernity to that of the A-Bomb. Harris quickly became known as Miss A-Bomb.

nextArticle.image_alt|e
Museum of the City of New York
New York City Exhibition Celebrates the Rebellious Victorian-Era Women Who Made History
Museum of the City of New York
Museum of the City of New York

At a time when women wore corsets and hooped skirts, the American Jewish actress Adah Isaacs Menken caused quite a stir when she appeared onstage in men’s clothing. It was the early 1860s, and her portrayal of a man in the play Mazeppa saw her ride into the theater on a horse while wearing a flesh-colored body stocking. Critics were shocked, but Menken paid no mind. Both on stage and in her daily life, she continued to disregard the norms of that era by cutting her hair short and smoking cigarettes in public.

Menken is just one of the daring women featured in a new exhibition at the Museum of the City of New York. Rebel Women: Defying Victorianism celebrates the New York women who challenged the rigid expectations of the Victorian era, and includes a collection of photographs, clothes, and prints from the period.

A caricatures of the "Grecian bend"
Museum of the City of New York

The 19th century was a period of constraints for women. "During this era, a woman could be considered a rebel simply by speaking in public, working outside the home, or disregarding middle‐class morality or decorum," according to a museum statement. “Yet 19th‐century New York City was full of women who defied those expectations in both overt and subtle ways.”

The exhibit highlights the accomplishments of historic figures who contributed to the advancement of women’s rights, like Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, but it also casts a light on lesser-known figures—many of whom history was unkind to.

A photo of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony
Museum of the City of New York

An illustration of women voting
Museum of the City of New York

There’s Ann Trow Lohman, also known as “Madame Restell,” who was dubbed “The Wickedest Woman in New York” for providing birth control to women. Similarly, Hetty Green earned the moniker “The Witch of Wall Street” for her successful career as a stock broker.

Visitors will also learn about a predecessor to Rosa Parks: Elizabeth Jennings Graham, a black New Yorker who refused to get off of a segregated street car in 1854.

Not all of the women had such noble goals, though, and the exhibition shows that men didn’t have a monopoly on crime. Notorious pickpocket and con-woman Sophie Lyons used her smarts and beauty to steal from wealthy men and earned a reputation as "the most notorious confidence woman America has ever produced."

The exhibition will be on view until January 6, 2019, and tickets can be purchased online.

Marshall McLuhan, the Man Who Predicted the Internet in 1962

Futurists of the 20th century were prone to some highly optimistic predictions. Theorists thought we might be extending our life spans to 150, working fewer hours, and operating private aircrafts from our homes. No one seemed to imagine we’d be communicating with smiley faces and poop emojis in place of words.

Marshall McLuhan didn’t call that either, but he did come closer than most to imagining our current technology-led environment. In 1962, the author and media theorist, predicted we’d have an internet.

That was the year McLuhan, a professor of English born in Edmonton, Canada on this day in 1911, wrote a book called The Gutenberg Galaxy. In it, he observed that human history could be partitioned into four distinct chapters: The acoustic age, the literary age, the print age, and the then-emerging electronic age. McLuhan believed this new frontier would be home to what he dubbed a “global village”—a space where technology spread information to anyone and everyone.

Computers, McLuhan said, “could enhance retrieval, obsolesce mass library organization,” and offer “speedily tailored data.”

McLuhan elaborated on the idea in his 1962 book, Understanding Media, writing:

"Since the inception of the telegraph and radio, the globe has contracted, spatially, into a single large village. Tribalism is our only resource since the electro-magnetic discovery. Moving from print to electronic media we have given up an eye for an ear."

But McLuhan didn’t concern himself solely with the advantages of a network. He cautioned that a surrender to “private manipulation” would limit the scope of our information based on what advertisers and others choose for users to see.

Marshall McLuhan died on December 31, 1980, several years before he was able to witness first-hand how his predictions were coming to fruition.

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios