25 Things We Learned in the First Issue of Nintendo Power

Starting in July/August 1988, a generation of kids eagerly anticipated every issue of Nintendo Power. It was probably the first regular mail many of us received. Here are 25 highlights, tips, tricks, and celebrity cameos that greeted video game fanatics of the late-'80s.

1. Up, Up, Down, Down, Left, Right, Left, Right, B, A, Start

Contra made The Konami Code famous, but it originated with a programmer on Gradius, Kazuhisa Hashimoto. "There was no way I could finish the game," said Hashimoto, "so I inserted the so-called Konami Code. There isn't [a story behind it], really. I mean, I was the one using it, so I just put in something I could remember easily."

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2. How to Get Mario 100 Extra Lives

One of Mario's most famous tricks. Here's a non-Nintendo Power tip for jumping over the flagpole.

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3. How to Beat Mike Tyson

If you want to give this a shot but don't have the patience to beat the King Hippos and Soda Popinskis of the world, remember these magic numbers: 007-373-5963.

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4. What Games Kirk and Candace Cameron Are Struggling With

"I am having problems getting past the Amoeboids in Gradius," explained the Growing Pains star. "I think that I'll have to place a call to the game counselors soon!" His sister Candace, who played D.J. Tanner on Full House, "has yet to rescue Zelda."

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5. Before Nintendo Power, There Was Fun Club News

A free publication called Nintendo Fun Club News preceded Nintendo Power.

Image credit: IGN

In an interview with Complex, founding editor Gail Tilden said, “The Fun Club newsletter started as a six page, simple thing in 1987. It was a direct response program to get a database of all our users. By the time we got to the Mike Tyson’s Punch-Out!! issue, however, we were at 600,000 readers, and it was a bigger bite out the market budget than we had anticipated." So they expanded it to a paid-subscription magazine.

There were seven issues of Fun Club, which you can find on eBay.

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6. The First Editor-in-Chief Was a 31-Year-Old Woman Who Kept a Low Profile

“No reader wants their mom to be the person running their video game magazine,” Gail Tilden explained to Complex. "It was very conscious that the editors did not have pictures of themselves in the magazine. It took away from the idea that the magazine was about ‘you,’ the consumer." Tilden served as editor for the first ten years.

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7. The Inaugural Power Rankings

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8. The Rest of the Top 10

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9. The Dealers LOVED R.C. Pro-Am

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10. You Could Call for Help

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11. The Existence of This Awesome Shirt

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12. The Cast of Characters for SMB2

"Mario, Luigi, Princess Toadstool and the Mushroom Retainer are getting involved in a strange dream world where they must hop, jump, run and find vegetables." To find out why kids in the U.S. didn't get the same sequel as kids did in Japan, read this Chris Higgins story.

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13. Where Everything is on Zelda's Second Quest

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14. How to Pull the Goalie

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15. The Umps in Bases Loaded Were Yuk, Dum, Boo, and Bum

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16. How to Beat Castlevania

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17. How to Beat Hewdraw

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18. What to Do With Pegasus' Flute

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19. There Were Books and Booklets

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20. The Exact Name of the Theme Song From Spy Hunter

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21. Someone Thought Double Dribble Was Amazing 

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22. Where to Get Screw Attack

Nothing in this issue about Justin Bailey, however.

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23. A Few Moves in Double Dragon

Including the devastating "Hair-Pull Kick."

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24. Big Things Were Coming

A few months later, Zelda II made the cover:

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25. We Were Playing With Power

The final issue of Nintendo Power was published in 2012, and the cover looked very much like the first one. Thanks to Kotaku for linking to the first issue and inspiring this trip down memory lane. Now go read Kevin Wong's history of Nintendo Power over at Complex Magazine.

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iStock
The NES Classic Edition Is Returning to Stores June 29
iStock
iStock

It wasn’t easy to land an NES Classic Edition when Nintendo released it in November 2016. In fact, it was nearly impossible. Stores were selling through their (extremely limited) stock within hours of hitting shelves, and soon enough, the only way to actually get one was to pay well above the MSRP on eBay or through a scalper.

Nintendo is now giving people another shot to satisfy their 8-bit nostalgia as the company announced that the NES Classic Edition will be hitting stores yet again starting June 29. Best Buy has already gotten out in front of it, announcing that they will be using a ticketing system for the console similar to how they treat Black Friday—and both in-store and online orders will be limited to just one per customer.

Chances are, many major retailers that got shipments in 2016 will get new stock on Friday, but no one knows how many each store will get, exactly. Thrillist got in touch with stores like ThinkGeek—which said "We do know it will be similar to last time. So, people will have to act fast."—and GameStop, where some stores may just see 10 units overall on Friday. If you want to make sure you're not wasting your time, call ahead.

This all may sound like more gloom and doom from Nintendo, but in a Facebook post about the release, the company did say both the NES and SNES Classic Editions will be available through the end of the year, meaning that while you might not score one on the 29th, you could still get one with a little patience.

The NES Classic hitting stores on June 29 will be the same one released in 2016, with 30 pre-loaded games, like Super Mario Bros. 3 and The Legend of Zelda, retailing at $59.99. The company's renewed interest in the Classic Edition isn't just a U.S. thing; on July 7, gamers in Japan will be able to pick up a special gold Famicom Mini loaded with 20 games based on popular manga series like Dragon Ball, Saint Seiya, and Fist of the North Star. Don't expect that one to make its way stateside, though.

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Netflix
A New Stranger Things Video Game Is in the Works
Netflix
Netflix

The world of Stranger Things is ready to get the proper video game treatment. TechRadar exclusively revealed that the hit sci-fi series from Netflix will be coming to consoles, courtesy of Telltale Games. Though details are scarce, this seems to be the beginning of a working relationship between the two companies as it was also announced that Telltale’s popular Minecraft: Story Mode game will soon be brought to Netflix as a “5-episode interactive narrative series,” according to the site.

Though Minecraft will be experienced through Netflix itself, the Stranger Things game will be a traditional console/computer release. If you’re unfamiliar with Telltale, its brand of games tends to favor a branching narrative experience that emphasizes player choice over button mashing. These point-and-click adventures usually don’t have a standard release schedule, either; instead, they’re split up into parts and distributed episodically for download. The games are usually released on consoles, including the Nintendo Switch, as well as PC, Android, and iOS.

While the highlight of Telltale’s work is widely considered to be its Walking Dead adaptations, they’ve also found success with other blockbuster franchises like Game of Thrones, Guardians of the Galaxy, and its latest effort, Batman: The Enemy Within. There’s no word on whether or not the Stranger Things cast will be involved in the game, or if it will follow the established Telltale formula. In a statement to TechRadar, a spokesperson for the developer said, “we're excited to reveal details on these projects later in the year.”

This might not be the end of Netflix’s foray into the video game world. While the company has no plans to enter the market itself, TechRadar did find a job listing at Netflix for a Manager of Interactive Licensing who will "use games as a marketing tactic to capture demand and delight our member community (ex: Stranger Things: The Game)." May your dreams of a Narcos economic simulator game be realized.

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