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Rent an Incredible Harry Potter-Themed Apartment in the City Where the Series Was Born

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Warner Bros.

The Muggle city of Edinburgh has deep ties to the wizarding world of Harry Potter. J.K. Rowling wrote much of the book series while living there, and there’s even a pub in Edinburgh that named itself after the author for a month. Now, fans passing through the Scottish capital have the chance to live like their favorite boy wizard. As Digital Spy reports, a Harry Potter-themed holiday home in the city’s historic district is now available to rent for around $200 (£150) a night.

Property owner Yue Gao used her own knowledge as a fan when decorating the apartment. With red and yellow accents, a four-poster bed, and floating candles adorning the wallpaper on the ceiling, the master bedroom pays tribute to both the Gryffindor dormitory and the Hogwarts Great Hall. The Hogwarts theme extends to the lounge area, where each door is painted with a different house’s colors and crest. Guests will also find design aspects inspired by the Hogwarts Express around the apartment: The second bedroom is designed to look like a sleeping car, and the front door is disguised as the brick wall at Platform 9 3/4.

Pieces of Harry Potter memorabilia Gao has picked up in her travels are hidden throughout the home, too. If visitors look closely, they’ll find several items that once belonged to Rowling herself, including the writer’s old desk.

Take a look at some of the photos of the magical interiors:

The apartment is available to rent throughout the year through canongateluxuryapartment.co.uk. And if you can tear yourself away from the residence for long enough, there are plenty of other Harry Potter-themed attractions to check out in Edinburgh during your stay.

[h/t Digital Spy]

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Big Questions
How Are Rooms Cleaned at an Ice Hotel?

Cleaning rooms at Sweden’s famous ICEHOTEL is arguably less involved than your typical hotel. The bed, for example, does not have traditional sheets. Instead, it’s essentially an air mattress topped with reindeer fur, which sits on top of a custom-made wooden palette that has a minimum of 60 centimeters of airspace below. On top of those reindeer hides is a sleeping bag, and inside that sleeping bag is a sleep sack. And while it’s always 20ºF inside the room, once guests wrap themselves up for the night, it can get cozy.

And, if they’re wearing too many layers, it can get quite sweaty, too.

“The sleep sack gets washed every day, I promise you that. I know it for a fact because I love to walk behind the laundry, because it’s so warm back there," James McClean, one of the few Americans—if not the only—who have worked at Sweden's ICEHOTEL, tells Mental Floss. (He worked on the construction and maintenance crew for several years.)

There isn’t much else to clean in most guest rooms. The bathrooms and showers are elsewhere in the hotel, and most guests only spend their sleeping hours in the space. But there is the occasional accident—like other hotels, some bodily fluids end up where they shouldn’t be. People puke or get too lazy to walk to the communal restrooms. Unlike other hotels, these bodily fluids, well, they freeze.

“You can only imagine the types of bodily fluids that get, I guess, excreted … or expelled … or purged onto the walls,” McClean says. “At least once a week there’s a yellow stain or a spilled glass of wine or cranberry juice … and it’s not what you want to see splattered everywhere.” Housekeeping fixes these unsightly splotches with an ice pick and shovel, re-patching it with fresh snow from outside.

Every room has a 4-inch vent drilled into the icy wall, which helps prevent CO2 from escalating to harmful levels. Maintenance checks the holes daily to ensure these vents are not plugged with snow. Their tool of choice for clearing the pathway is, according to McClean, “basically a toilet brush on a stick.”

When maintenance isn’t busy unstuffing snow from that vent hole, they’re busy piping snow through it. Every couple days, the floor of each room receives a new coat of fluffy snow, which is piped through the vent and leveled with a garden rake.

“It’s the equivalent of vacuuming the carpet,” McClean says.

Have you got a Big Question you'd like us to answer? If so, let us know by emailing us at bigquestions@mentalfloss.com.

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6 Tips From Travel Experts for Packing Winter Clothes
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Winter is a great time to snag travel deals, but if you’re going to spend all those extra savings on baggage fees, you’re better off staying home. To get the most out of your winter vacation, pack your clothes efficiently. Not only will you save money at the airport, but you’ll also save time and stress during the packing and unpacking process. We asked some travel experts about the methods they use to maximize their luggage space when heavy winter clothing is involved.

1. WEAR YOUR BULKIEST ITEMS.

A woman in a winter coat and gloves stands in an airport with her suitcase.
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No matter what folding method or fancy equipment you use, your winter coat will always take up more room in your suitcase than a t-shirt. One simple way to save space is to forgo packing it in your bag at all and wear it on the trip. The layering method is an essential strategy for Chris Elliott, travel writer and author of How to Be the World's Smartest Traveler (and Save Time, Money, and Hassle). “This method lets you avoid having to pack your heavy winter jacket, which as you know can easily fill up the entire carry-on,” he tells Mental Floss.

The same trick applies to your boots, gloves, scarves, sweaters, and any other piece of winter gear you can slip on without overheating. And don’t worry, you won’t be dressed for the tundra for the entirety of your journey: As soon as you get into the car or plane, slip off your jacket and use it to get comfy. Kristin Addis, writer of the travel blog Be My Travel Muse, does this when when she’s not storing her jacket in the overhead bin. “Sometimes flights are so cold that it’s really nice to use it as a blanket or extra pillow,” she tells Mental Floss.

2. FIND THE RIGHT BAG.

A closeup of a suitcase in front of a blue sky with a plane flying by.
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Winter puts your luggage to the test. A well-made bag should be able to fit a last-minute pair of socks when it’s already full to the brim, while an old, cheap model will be stretching at the seams long before that. Elliott recommends that travelers prioritize quality over bells and whistles. “You might have a really awesome bag that’s self-weighing and it’s got a charger in it,” he says, “but if it doesn’t hold up to the rigors of travel, you should leave it at home.” For a bag that delivers both fancy features and durability, Elliott recommends Blue Smart.

3. REMEMBER: LESS IS MORE.

A woman sitting on an overstuffed suitcase.
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Stuffing in that one extra sweater can be the undoing of many winter travelers. Instead of focusing on bulky outerwear, Addis prefers to pack light base layers that will keep her toasty without pushing her luggage past the weight limit. “I try to bring things that are inherently warm and lightweight like merino wool ski underwear and a very warm down jacket,” she tells Mental Floss. “Even with just those two layers I am good in -20°C as long as it is a dry cold.” If you have base layers packed for every day of your trip, there’s no reason to bring more than one or two sweaters. No one will fault you for wearing the same outfit twice. Elliott also prefers to pack base layers from quality brands like North Face over the flashier items he has in his closet. “If you’re going somewhere really cold, unless you're going to Aspen, you don’t really need to make a fashion statement,” he says. “You don’t need to pack your entire wardrobe.”

4. USE THE NAVY FOLDING METHOD.

A closeup of a person's hands packing rolled clothes into a suitcase.
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To roll or to fold? That is the question that plagues many travelers when they first set out to fill a suitcase. You may suspect that it doesn’t make much of a difference either way, but to both Elliott and Addis the answer is clear: Rolling is the way to go. For lighter undershirts, employ the fold-and-roll method used by the Navy. Lay the shirt flat on your bed or some other surface and fold the bottom third of the shirt to its back side. Next fold it vertically, laying the right half of the shirt over the left half. Finally, fold the left third of the shirt into the middle and then fold the remaining right third over that. Compress it even tighter by rolling the whole thing up starting from the collar. For sweaters, you can get away with a few less folds. Lay the garment flat and fold the arms behind the back to make an “X”. Fold it in two vertically—now you’re ready to start rolling it tight from top to bottom. If you’re worried about your perfectly bundled packages unraveling, secure them with a rubber band to give yourself peace of mind. Having a hard time visualizing how it's done? Check out this video.

5. INVEST IN LUGGAGE CUBES.

A set of three Eagle Creek packing cubes.
Amazon

To pack like a pro, get your hands on a set of luggage cubes. After testing them out, Elliott says he’ll never go back. “I always thought luggage cubes were gimmicky and then I tried them,” he says, “They are not gimmicky at all. Two luggage cubes can save you a ton of space.” Elliot's favorite cubes are from Eagle Creek. The mesh, zippered containers are basically mini suitcases: Fold and roll your clothes like you normally would then squeeze them into the cubes until they're full. The packed cubes fit like puzzle pieces into your bag, helping to maximize space. Addis is also a fan. “My big secret is packing cubes!” she says. “I roll and stuff each item into them, zip it up, and then it is organized and more compact.”

6. WEIGH YOUR BAG.

A woman weighing a suitcase on a scale.
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One extra pound can make the difference between paying an extra $50 at the airport and walking on the flight with that money in your pocket. Traveling with heavy winter gear means your bag is more likely to tip past the 50-pound limit. Avoid getting blind-sided at security by weighing your bag before you leave the house (a digital luggage scale is perfect for this). Pack the bare minimum amount of supplies you need before your first weight check. If you have a few pounds to spare and some room left in the bag, reward yourself by chucking in your favorite scarf or sweater you planned to leave behind.

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