11 Amazing Facts About Veins

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The human body is an amazing thing. For each one of us, it's the most intimate object we know. And yet most of us don't know enough about it: its features, functions, quirks, and mysteries. Our series The Body explores human anatomy, part by part. Think of it as a mini digital encyclopedia with a dose of wow.

Beneath your skin, and deeper within your body, run networks of veins. These thin, tube-like structures are an essential part of the circulatory system, which distributes blood and nutrients throughout the body. What Thomas E. Eidson, a phlebologist (vein disease specialist) at Atlas Vein Care in Arlington, Texas, finds most compelling about veins is "how absolutely intricate and fragile the circulatory system can seem and yet at the same time be so resilient and adaptive."

1. VEINS ARE ONE OF THREE KINDS OF BLOOD VESSELS.

Three types of blood vessels make up the human circulatory system: arteries, veins, and capillaries. All three of these vessels transport blood, oxygen, nutrients, and hormones to organs and cells. While arteries carry oxygenated blood away from the heart to the tissues of the body, veins carry oxygen-depleted blood from the tissues back to the heart, and in fact have special valves that help them to achieve this directional flow. Capillaries are tiny blood vessels that connect arteries to veins and allow nutrients in the blood to diffuse to the body's tissues.

2. A SINGLE VEIN IS COMPRISED OF THREE LAYERS.

Veins, small as they are, consist of three layers. According to Eidson, these layers are known as the tunica adventitia, tunica media, and tunica intima. The tunica adventitia is the tough outer layer of arteries and veins and is made mainly of connective tissues. The middle layer, tunica media, is all smooth muscle and elastic fibers. This layer is thinner in veins than in arteries. The innermost layer, tunica intima, comes in direct contact with blood as it flows through the vein. This structure is made up of smooth cells and has a hollow center known as the lumen.

3. OUR BODIES CONTAIN UP TO 100,000 MILES OF BLOOD VESSELS.

All the arteries, veins, and capillaries of a human child, stretched end to end, are estimated to wrap around the Earth about 2.5 times (the equivalent of about 60,000 miles). The amount of blood vessels in a human adult would circle our planet four times, equaling 100,000 miles, according to Eidson.

4. CAPILLARIES ARE SMALLER THAN THE WIDTH OF A HUMAN HAIR.

Capillaries are tiny—at their smallest, they're less than a third of the thickness of a human hair. But to really put it into perspective, consider that when red blood cells flow through capillaries, "[they] must travel through them one cell at a time in a single-file line," Eidson says.

5. PHYSICIANS HAD THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM ALL WRONG UNTIL THE 17TH CENTURY.

"Physicians followed an incorrect model of the circulatory system proposed by Greek physician and philosopher Galen of Pergamon from about the 2nd century CE until the 1600s," Eidson says. According to a paper in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis, Galen thought there were two systems: one in which the liver, not the heart, produced blood that was distributed in the body centrifugally, and another where arteries carried air from the lungs and more blood to tissues. "Blood was not seen to circulate but rather to slowly ebb and flow," author W.C. Aird wrote. This attitude prevailed until 1628, when English physician William Harvey first correctly described the circulatory system and the function of the heart.

6. THE BODY CAN FORM NEW VESSELS WHEN ONE IS BLOCKED.

Eidson says the body can form new blood vessels if a pathway gets blocked, a process called angiogenesis or neovascularization. On the positive side, this is the process by which flesh wounds heal, drawing nutrients and oxygen from the nearest healthy capillaries to the site of those that are damaged; this isn't too hard given how numerous capillaries are in the body. On the negative side, this same process can lead to corneal neovascularization, in which new blood vessels invade the cornea from the limbus, a part of the eye where the cornea meets the sclera—the white part of the eye. The extra blood vessels can cause inflammation and scarring of the cornea, and even result in blindness.

7. ONE PHYSICIAN PERFORMED A PIONEERING EXPERIMENT ON VEINS IN THE ARM—HIS OWN.

German physician Werner Forssmann performed a cardiac catheterization on himself in 1929. In this procedure, a thin tube called a catheter is inserted into one of the large blood vessels in the arm that leads to the heart. The medical community at the time believed studying the heart was highly unorthodox, but Forssmann was determined to prove them wrong. If the procedure succeeded, Forssmann would be able to show that a catheter could assess the pressure in the organ and how well the heart is working.

He made an incision on the inside of his left elbow and threaded the thin tube into his heart—and had a technician take an X-ray to prove the penetration was a success. Then he calmly removed the catheter from his arm with no side effects. Now, "it's a procedure performed in the U.S. approximately 1 million times per year," Eidson says. Forssmann also went on to win the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 1956, shutting up his detractors.

8. STRONG VEINS ARE ESSENTIAL TO A STRONG BODY.

Veins return oxygen-depleted blood back to the heart against the force of gravity. "If veins are too weak—a condition called venous insufficiency—blood can pool in the legs and skin causing swelling, pain, discoloration, and wounds," says Albert Malvehy, a venous and lymphatic specialist and phlebology sonographer in Delray Beach, Florida. Chronic venous insufficiency is more common in people who are obese, pregnant, or who have a family history of the problem. It can also be caused by high blood pressure in the leg veins, as a result of sitting or standing for long stints; not enough exercise, smoking, or deep vein thrombosis (blood clots). Depending on the severity, treatments may range from medication to surgery.

9. VARICOSE VEINS ARE CAUSED BY DAMAGED VALVES.

When venous valves are damaged, blood can flow in the wrong direction and lead to stretched-out, bulging veins, Gregory P. Kezele, the medical director of Vein Clinics of Cleveland, tells Mental Floss. Varicose veins, which can range in color from purplish to neutral, appear twisted and gnarled, and may be raised on the skin's surface. (Don't confuse them with spider veins, which are clusters of bluish or reddish veins near the surface of the skin that resemble webs, hence the name.) Conditions like pregnancy, obesity, and genetic predisposition can cause them. Once varicose veins appear—usually on the legs—they require a medical procedure to get rid of them.

Veins are a critical part of normal circulation in the body, so varicose veins can be more than just a cosmetic issue. "They can be a sign of a deeper circulation problem," Malvehy says. "People with varicose veins, leg pain, restless legs syndrome, leg wounds, and leg swelling should be checked by a vein specialist."

One in five people have vein disease. As recently as 10 years ago, there were few treatments to offer varicose vein sufferers except for vein stripping surgery, in which problematic veins are removed. Malvehy says that over the past decade, "there has been a revolution in treatment, such that almost all vein issues can be treated in the office with no downtime."

One common treatment is sclerotherapy, in which a liquid solution is forced into the bulging vein to stop the flow of blood. The vein will eventually turn into scar tissue and fade away, though follow-up treatments might be needed.

Another treatment is thermal ablation, performed using ultrasound guidance. Kezele explains that a physician will insert a small catheter into the diseased veins, which then delivers heat; the heat will close off blood flow to the problem veins and improve circulation as blood diverts to healthy veins.

10. AN EARLY DEPICTION OF VEIN DISEASE APPEARS IN A SCULPTURE FROM 340 BCE.

According to Kezele, the first depiction of vein disease appears on a Greek tablet dating to the 4th century BCE. The carving, from the sanctuary of Amynos, shows a man clutching a giant, disembodied leg with a bulging vein. Kezele suggests on his website that "it shows the Greek official Lysimachides dedicating a fake leg suffering from a varicose vein to Amynos," an Athenian hero revered as a healer.

11. VEINS MIGHT "POP OUT" WHEN YOU EXERCISE.

There are lots of theories on why athletes often have big, bodaciously bulging veins visible on their arms or legs after they work out. The ropy look is completely normal and temporary. Writing in Scientific American, physiology professor Mark A. W. Andrews said that a likely cause of protruding veins is arterial blood pressure during exercise. Blood that would otherwise be resting in capillaries is forced out by the pressure into the surrounding muscle. That process—called filtration—makes the muscles swell, which pushes nearby veins closer to the skin's surface so they take on a bulging appearance. The process is more noticeable in athletes and body builders with very little subcutaneous fat.

25 Amazing Facts About the Human Body

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The human body is an amazing piece of machinery—with a few weird quirks.

  1. It’s possible to brush your teeth too aggressively. Doing so can wear down enamel and make teeth sensitive to hot and cold foods.

  2. Goose bumps evolved to make our ancestors’ hair stand up, making them appear more threatening to predators.

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  1. Wisdom teeth serve no purpose. They’re left over from hundreds of thousands of years ago. As early humans’ brains grew bigger, it reduced space in the mouth, crowding out this third set of molars.

  2. Scientists aren't exactly sure why we yawn, but it may help regulate body temperature.

  3. Your fingernails don’t actually grow after you’re dead.

  4. If they were laid end to end, all of the blood vessels in the human body would encircle the Earth four times.

  5. Humans are the only animals with chins.

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    1. As you breathe, most of the air is going in and out of one nostril. Every few hours, the workload shifts to the other nostril.

    2. Blood makes up about 8 percent of your total body weight.

    3. The human nose can detect about 1 trillion smells.

    4. You have two kidneys, but only one is necessary to live.

    5. Belly buttons grow special hairs to catch lint.

      A woman putting her hands in a heart shape around her belly button
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      1. The satisfying sound of cracking your knuckles comes from gas bubbles bursting in your joints.

      2. Skin is the body’s largest organ and can comprise 15 percent of a person’s total weight.

      3. Thumbs have their own pulse.

      4. Your tongue is made up of eight interwoven muscles, similar in structure to an elephant’s trunk or an octopus’s tentacle.

      5. On a genetic level, all human beings are more than 99 percent identical.

        Identical twin baby boys in striped shirts
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        1. The foot is one of the most ticklish parts of the body.

        2. Extraocular muscles in the eye are the body’s fastest muscles. They allow both of your eyes to flick in the same direction in a single 50-millisecond movement.

        3. A surgical procedure called a selective amygdalohippocampectomy removes half of the brain’s amygdala—and with it, the patient’s sense of fear.

        4. The pineal gland, which secretes the hormone melatonin, got its name from its shape, which resembles a pine nut.

        5. Hair grows fast—about 6 inches per year. The only thing in the body that grows faster is bone marrow.

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          1. No one really knows what fingerprints are for, but they might help wick water away from our hands, prevent blisters, or improve touch.

          2. The heart beats more than 3 billion times in the average human lifespan.

          3. Blushing is caused by a rush of adrenaline.

12 Intriguing Facts About the Intestines

When we talk about the belly, gut, or bowels, what we're really talking about are the intestines—long, hollow, coiled tubes that comprise a major part of the digestive tract, running from the stomach to the anus. The intestines begin with the small intestine, divided into three parts whimsically named the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum, which absorb most of the nutrients from what we eat and drink. Food then moves into the large intestine, or colon, which absorbs water from the digested food and expels it into the rectum. That's when sensitive nerves in your rectum create the sensation of needing to poop.

These organs can be the source of intestinal pain, such as in irritable bowel syndrome, but they can also support microbes that are beneficial to your overall health. Here are some more facts about your intestines.

1. The intestines were named by medieval anatomists.

Medieval anatomists had a pretty good understanding of the physiology of the gut, and are the ones who gave the intestinal sections their names, which are still used today in modern anatomy. When they weren't moralizing about the organs, they got metaphorical about them. In 1535, the Spanish doctor Andrés Laguna noted that because the intestines "carry the chyle and all the excrement through the entire region of the stomach as if through the Ocean Sea," they could be likened to "those tall ships which as soon as they have crossed the ocean come to Rouen with their cargoes on their way to Paris but transfer their cargoes at Rouen into small boats for the last stage of the journey up the Seine."

2. Leonardo da Vinci believed the intestines helped you breathe.

Leonardo mistakenly believed the digestive system aided respiratory function. In 1490, he wrote in his unpublished notebooks, "The compressed intestines with the condensed air which is generated in them, thrust the diaphragm upwards; the diaphragm compresses the lungs and expresses the air." While that isn't anatomically accurate, it is true that the opening of the lungs is helped by the relaxation of stomach muscles, which does draw down the diaphragm.

3. Your intestines could cover two tennis courts ...

Your intestines take up a whole lot of square footage inside you. "The surface area of the intestines, if laid out flat, would cover two tennis courts," Colby Zaph, a professor of immunology in the department of biochemistry and molecular biology at Melbourne's Monash University, tells Mental Floss. The small intestine alone is about 20 feet long, and the large intestine about 5 feet long.

4. ... and they're pretty athletic.

The process of moving food through your intestines requires a wave-like pattern of muscular action, known as peristalsis, which you can see in action during surgery in this YouTube video.

5. Your intestines can fold like a telescope—but that's not something you want to happen.

Intussusception is the name of a condition where a part of your intestine folds in on itself, usually between the lower part of the small intestine and the beginning of the large intestine. It often presents as severe intestinal pain and requires immediate medical attention. It's very rare, and in children may be related to a viral infection. In adults, it's more commonly a symptom of an abnormal growth or polyp.

6. Intestines are very discriminating.

"The intestines have to discriminate between good things—food, water, vitamins, good bacteria—and bad things, such as infectious organisms like viruses, parasites and bad bacteria," Zaph says. Researchers don't entirely know how the intestines do this. Zaph says that while your intestines are designed to keep dangerous bacteria contained, infectious microbes can sometimes penetrate your immune system through your intestines.

7. The small intestine is covered in "fingers" ...

The lining of the small intestine is blanketed in tiny finger-like protrusions known as villi. These villi are then covered in even tinier protrusions called microvilli, which help capture food particles to absorb nutrients, and move food on to the large intestine.

8. ... And you can't live without it.

Your small intestine "is the sole point of food and water absorption," Zaph says. Without it, "you'd have to be fed through the blood."

9. The intestines house your microbiome. 

The microbiome is made up of all kinds of microorganisms, including bacteria, viruses, fungi, and protozoans, "and probably used to include worm parasites too," says Zaph. So in a way, he adds, "we are constantly infected with something, but it [can be] helpful, not harmful."

10. Intestines are sensitive to change.

Zaph says that many factors change the composition of the microbiome, including antibiotics, foods we eat, stress, and infections. But in general, most people's microbiomes return to a stable state after these events. "The microbiome composition is different between people and affected by diseases. But we still don't know whether the different microbiomes cause disease, or are a result in the development of disease," he says.

11. Transferring bacteria from one gut to another can transfer disease—or maybe cure it.

"Studies in mice show that transplanting microbes from obese mice can transfer obesity to thin mice," Zaph says. But transplanting microbes from healthy people into sick people can be a powerful treatment for some intestinal infections, like that of the bacteria Clostridium difficile, he adds. Research is pouring out on how the microbiome affects various diseases, including multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's, and even autism.

12. The microbes in your intestines might influence how you respond to medical treatments.

Some people don't respond to cancer drugs as effectively as others, Zaph says. "One reason is that different microbiomes can metabolize the drugs differently." This has huge ramifications for chemotherapy and new cancer treatments called checkpoint inhibitors. As scientists learn more about how different bacteria metabolize drugs, they could possibly improve how effective existing cancer treatments are.

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