Coming to New York in 2018: A Floating Glass Museum

The Corning Museum of Glass
The Corning Museum of Glass

In 2018, art fans in New York state who can’t make the trip to Steuben County to visit the Corning Museum of Glass can check out their floating mini-museum dedicated to the craft. Called GlassBarge, the traveling studio will cruise up the Hudson River and along the Erie Canal, providing live glass-blowing demonstrations in port cities along the way.


The Corning Museum of Glass

Corning, New York is home to Corning Incorporated, the major glass company once known as Corning Glass Works. Originally based in New York City and called the Brooklyn Flint Glass Company, the business relocated upstate in 1868 via New York’s rivers and waterways. Their commercial success ultimately led to the opening of the Corning Museum of Glass in 1951, which today contains one of the world's most important glass collections.


The Corning Museum of Glass

“The glass inventions and technology developed in Corning have shaped the modern world, from the first electric light bulbs for Thomas Edison and the invention of optical fiber for telecommunications, to the glass used in modern flat screen displays,” Rob Cassetti, Senior Director of Creative Strategy and Visitor Engagement at the Corning Museum of Glass, said in a statement.

Running from May through September, the upcoming GlassBarge voyage will help celebrate the 150th anniversary of the company's move from Brooklyn to upstate. The grant-funded trip kicks off in Brooklyn and ends in the Finger Lakes, with a concluding ceremony in Corning on September 22, 2018. Throughout the trip, glass artisans will hold live dockside demonstrations in Yonkers, Kingston, Albany, Syracuse, Rochester, and Buffalo. Guiding the barge will be a historic tugboat, the W. O. Decker, which will travel alongside the Lois McClure, a replica of an 1862 canal barge, and the C. L. Churchill, a 1964 tugboat.

In addition to marking an industrial milestone, GlassBarge will “allow us to share our story with a special audience: our neighbors here in New York state, who all know and love the waterways that enabled Corning to become what it is today,” Cassetti tells Mental Floss.

Disney's Most Magical Destinations Have Been Reimagined as Vintage Travel Posters

UpgradedPoints.com
UpgradedPoints.com

Many of the iconic settings of animated Disney movies were modeled after real places around the world. Ussé Castle in France’s Loire Valley, for example, is widely rumored to have been the inspiration behind the original Sleeping Beauty story. (Although the castle in the movie more closely resembles Germany's Neuschwanstein Castle.) Likewise, the fictional island in Moana was made to look like Samoa, and the Sultan’s palace in Aladdin shares some similarities with India's Taj Mahal.

If you’ve ever dreamed of exploring Agrabah or Neverland, then you’ll probably enjoy getting lost in these Disney-inspired travel posters from the designers at UpgradedPoints.com, an online resource that helps individuals maximize their credit card travel rewards. Only one of the posters features a real destination ("Beautiful France"), but these illustrations let you get one step closer to scaling Pride Rock or plumbing the depths of Atlantica.

All of the images are rendered in a vintage style with enticing slogans attached—much like the exotic travel posters that were prevalent in the 1930s.

“A few of our designers wanted to capture that longing to experience the true locations of these fantastic films, and the inner child in all of us couldn’t resist seeing how they interpreted the locations of their favorite films,” UpgradedPoints.com writes. “The results are breathtaking and make us wish we could fall into our favorite Disney movies.”

Keep scrolling to see the posters, and for more travel inspiration, read up on eight real-life locations that inspired Disney places (plus one that didn't).

A Disney-inspired poster of France
UpgradedPoints.com

An Atlantica travel poster
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A Disney-inspired poster
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A Disney-inspired poster
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A Lion King travel poster
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A Neverland travel poster
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Last Surviving Person of Interest in Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum Heist to Be Released From Prison

Federal Bureau of Investigation, Wikimedia Commons // Public domain
Federal Bureau of Investigation, Wikimedia Commons // Public domain

Almost exactly 29 years ago, two men disguised as police officers weaseled their way into Boston’s Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum and started removing prized artworks from the wall. They made off with 13 famous paintings and sculptures, representing a value of more than $500 million. It remains the largest property theft in U.S. history, but no one has ever been charged in connection with the heist.

Now, as Smithsonian reports, the last living person who may have first-hand knowledge about the heist will be released from prison this Sunday after serving 54 months for an unrelated crime. Robert (Bobby) Gentile, an 82-year-old mobster who was jailed for selling a gun to a known murderer, has been questioned by authorities in the past. In 2010, the wife of the late mobster Robert (Bobby) Guarente told investigators she had seen her husband give several of the artworks in question to Gentile—a good friend of Guarente’s—eight years prior.

A 2012 raid of Gentile’s home also revealed a list of black market prices for the stolen items. Previous testimony from other mob associates—coupled with the fact that Gentile had failed a polygraph test when he was questioned about the art heist—suggest Gentile might know more about the crime than he has let on. For his part, though, Gentile says he is innocent and knows nothing about the art or the heist.

The FBI announced in 2013 that it knew who was responsible for the museum heist, but would not reveal their names because they were dead. Still, the whereabouts of the artworks—including prized paintings by Rembrandt, Manet, Vermeer, and Degas—remain unknown. The museum is offering a $10 million reward to anyone who can provide information leading to “the recovery of all 13 works in good condition," according to the museum's website. A separate $100,000 reward will be provided for the return of an eagle finial that was used by Napoleon’s Imperial Guard.

[h/t Smithsonian]

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