CLOSE
Original image
Getty Images

29 Vintage Photos of Dogs Being Man's Best Friend

Original image
Getty Images

Happy National Dog Day! Celebrate by taking a look at these historical pictures of pooches. All photos and captions courtesy of Getty Images.

1. 1860: A canine amateur photographer.

2. 1867: A Victorian family sitting outside their country home.

3. 1890: A woman posing for a portrait in a photographic studio with her dog.

4. 1890: Children of the Klondike area of Yukon Territory, Canada, sitting with their dog by a street sign. In the 1890's there was a great gold rush here, yielding over $22 million worth of gold in one peak year of production.

5. 1895: A pet dog sitting on the dining room table whilst a couple has their dinner.

6. 1904: A party of holidaymakers at the seaside.

7. 1908: A young crocodile, the perfect new pet for ladies, as demonstrated by this woman and her dog at Bostock's Jungle, Earls Court.

8.1910: Lady Aberdeen, wife of British statesman John Campbell Hamilton Gordon (1847 - 1934), 7th Earl of Aberdeen, with her dogs at Dublin Castle.

9. 1917: A member of the American medical staff, who are playing in a baseball match at Epsom, holds their bulldog mascot which is in uniform.

10. 1924: Natalie Kingston, one of Mack Sennett's bathing belles, is pictured on the beach, embracing her dog.

11. 1925: A dog dressed in a suit tries to get past a security guard at the Metro Goldwyn Mayer studios.

12. 1925: A young child with a bowl and a little dog on a lead.

13. 1926: Mrs H Bebbington and her Great Dane Hereward of Cubourough at the Croydon Dog Show.

14. 1926: Ralph Miller spars with 10-month old "Battling Von," a member of the Melford Kennels AC of Los Angeles.

15. 1926: Mr. Barnard, a member of the London Aero Club, makes sure that his canine co-pilot has the right goggles.

16. 1929: American President Calvin Coolidge with his wife and dog in front of the White House.

17. 1930: Mrs. Bernard Cathbert drapes one of her chow dogs around her shoulders in the garden of Omar House, Catford, London.

18. 1932: A doggie produces a milk bottle in an effort to stem the flood of tears from its charge.

19. 1934: Wally Kilminster enjoys a foam bath with his dog in the dressing rooms at Wembley Stadium.

20. 1935: Little Evelyn Luff with her entourage of Saint Bernard dogs at Staines Abbots Pass kennels, near Reigate in Surrey.

21. 1938: A kennel-maid from Ifield Kennels takes to a bicycle to exercise two French Poodles.

22. 1941: American President Franklin Delano Roosevelt in his car with his Scottish terrier, Fala.

23. 1954: A cyclist in Holland transports her pet dog in one of the panniers on the back of her bicycle.

24. 1955: A dog joins its owner at the salon for a cut and blow-dry.

25. 1955: A young pupil from Green Chimneys school, Brewster, New York, playing with a bull terrier.

26. 1960: Actress Audrey Hepburn on a film set with her pet poodle.

27. 1962: Charles Tumbridge riding his scooter through the streets of Kensal Rise, London, with his pet dog Susie in his mobile kennel.

28. 1966: A blind woman relaxes at the local swimming pool, watched over by her guide dog.

29. 1971: Miss Freda Cook wheels in her West Highland White Terriers to the Crufts Dog Show at the Olympia Stadium.

Original image
iStock
arrow
Big Questions
Why Do Cats Freak Out After Pooping?
Original image
iStock

Cats often exhibit some very peculiar behavior, from getting into deadly combat situations with their own tail to pouncing on unsuspecting humans. Among their most curious habits: running from their litter box like a greyhound after moving their bowels. Are they running from their own fecal matter? Has waste elimination prompted a sense of euphoria?

Experts—if anyone is said to qualify as an expert in post-poop moods—aren’t exactly sure, but they’ve presented a number of entertaining theories. From a biological standpoint, some animal behaviorists suspect that a cat bolting after a deposit might stem from fears that a predator could track them based on the smell of their waste. But researchers are quick to note that they haven’t observed cats run from their BMs in the wild.

Biology also has a little bit to do with another theory, which postulates that cats used to getting their rear ends licked by their mother after defecating as kittens are showing off their independence by sprinting away, their butts having taken on self-cleaning properties in adulthood.

Not convinced? You might find another idea more plausible: Both humans and cats have a vagus nerve running from their brain stem. In both species, the nerve can be stimulated by defecation, leading to a pleasurable sensation and what some have labeled “poo-phoria,” or post-poop elation. In running, the cat may simply be working off excess energy brought on by stimulation of the nerve.

Less interesting is the notion that notoriously hygienic cats may simply want to shake off excess litter or fecal matter by running a 100-meter dash, or that a digestive problem has led to some discomfort they’re attempting to flee from. The fact is, so little research has been done in the field of pooping cat mania that there’s no universally accepted answer. Like so much of what makes cats tick, a definitive motivation will have to remain a mystery.

Have you got a Big Question you'd like us to answer? If so, let us know by emailing us at bigquestions@mentalfloss.com.

Original image
RODRIGO ARANGUA/AFP/GettyImages
arrow
Animals
Listen to the Impossibly Adorable Sounds of a Baby Sloth
Original image
RODRIGO ARANGUA/AFP/GettyImages

Sometimes baby sloths seem almost too adorable to be real. But the little muppet-faced treasures don't just look cute—turns out they sound cute, too. We know what you're thinking: How could you have gone your whole life without knowing what these precious creatures sound like? Well, fear not: Just in time for International Sloth Day (today), we have some footage of how the tiny mammals express themselves—and it's a lot of squeaking. (Or maybe that's you squealing?)

The sloths featured in the heart-obliterating video below come from the Sloth Sanctuary of Costa Rica. The institution rescues orphaned sloths, rehabilitates them, and gets them ready to be released back into the wild.

[h/t The Kid Should See This]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios