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A Man-Made Mountain in Finland Serves as an 11,000-Tree Time Capsule

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In 1982, the conceptual artist Agnes Denes set out to make a mountain. After a decade of work, she made it happen. In 1992, the Finnish government announced that it would sponsor Denes’s Tree Mountain—a 125-foot-tall manmade mountain built on top of a former gravel pit, designed to serve as part time capsule, part ecological recovery project.

Tree Mountain — A Living Time Capsule was constructed on the site of a former gravel pit near Ylöjärvi, Finland between 1992 and 1996. The artificially constructed landmass stands 125 feet tall, almost 1400 feet long, and more than 885 feet wide. (The top image of the triptych above shows the mountain in 1992 and the bottom image in 2013.) The forest planted on it forms a precise mathematical pattern Agnes designed based on the golden ratio-derived spirals of sunflowers and pineapples. From above, the oval mountain looks like a giant fingerprint made up of whorls of trees.

The project was never intended to just be aesthetically pleasing. Envisioned as a way to rehab land destroyed by mining, the trees are meant to develop undisturbed for 400 years, creating what will eventually be an Old Growth forest that can reduce erosion, provide wildlife habitats, and boost oxygen production.

And it was a communal effort. The roughly 11,000 pine trees were planted by different individuals who then became the custodians of those trees. Each received a certificate declaring their ownership for the project’s full term of 400 years. They can pass along this ownership to their descendants or to others for as many as 20 generations. These custodians (which include former UK prime minister John Major and former Icelandic president Vigdís Finnbogadóttir) are even allowed to be buried under their trees. But the trees can never be moved, and the mountain itself can’t be owned or sold off for those 400 years.

A triptych of images of Tree Mountain
Tree Mountain - A Living Time Capsule - 11,000 Trees, 11,000 People, 400 Years (Triptych) 1992-1996, 1992/2013
Copyright Agnes Denes, courtesy Leslie Tonkonow Artworks + Projects, New York

“Tree Mountain is the largest monument on earth that is international in scope, unparalleled in duration, and not dedicated to the human ego, but to benefit future generations with a meaningful legacy,” Denes writes. It “affirms humanity's commitment to the future well being of ecological, social and cultural life on the planet.”

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Martin Wittfooth
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The Cat Art Show Is Coming Back to Los Angeles in June
Martin Wittfooth
Martin Wittfooth

After dazzling cat and art lovers alike in 2014 and again in 2016, the Cat Art Show is ready to land in Los Angeles for a third time. The June exhibition, dubbed Cat Art Show 3: The Sequel Returns Again, will feature feline-centric works from such artists as Mark Ryden, Ellen von Unwerth, and Marion Peck.

Like past shows, this one will explore cats through a variety of themes and media. “The enigmatic feline has been a source of artistic inspiration for thousands of years,” the show's creator and curator Susan Michals said in a press release. “One moment they can be a best friend, the next, an antagonist. They are the perfect subject matter, and works of art, all by themselves.”

While some artists have chosen straightforward interpretations of the starring subject, others are using cats as a springboard into topics like gender, politics, and social media. The sculpture, paintings, and photographs on display will be available to purchase, with prices ranging from $300 to $150,000.

Over 9000 visitors are expected to stop into the Think Tank Gallery in Los Angeles during the show's run from June 14 to June 24. Tickets to the show normally cost $5, with a portion of the proceeds benefiting a cat charity, and admission will be free for everyone on Wednesday, June 20. Check out a few of the works below.

Man in Garfield mask holding cat.
Tiffany Sage

Painting of kitten.
Brandi Milne

Art work of cat in tree.
Kathy Taselitz

Painting of white cat.
Rose Freymuth-Frazier

A cat with no eyes.
Rich Hardcastle

Painting of a cat on a stool.
Vanessa Stockard

Sculpture of pink cat.
Scott Hove

Painting of cat.
Yael Hoenig
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This Wall Chart Shows Every Oil Painting Vincent Van Gogh Ever Created
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Vincent van Gogh, among other things, was a prolific painter. He created 85 oil paintings of women, 70 of flowers, 42 of wheat fields, and 38 of his own image. The Post-Impressionist master’s nearly 900 oil paintings can now be seen all in one place, thanks to a new wall chart from Curious Charts.

A chart of Van Gogh's paintings
Curious Charts

In this “Visual Taxonomy of Van Gogh,” the painter’s oeuvre is organized into a few categories, like still lifes and landscapes, and further broken down into subcategories such as water and bridges, wheat, and trees. Timothy Sanders, who runs Curious Charts with his wife, Aurélia, said he started out by organizing Van Gogh’s works into categories in an Excel spreadsheet.

“When we had the idea of trying to fit all of Van Gogh’s paintings, which is almost 900 in total, onto a single poster-sized chart, it was really exciting,” he says in the video below. “But as we quickly discovered, there were a lot of challenges.”

Size and spacing were the biggest issues, and the 24-inch-by-36-inch poster took three months to create. There are notations underneath each image specifying the title of the work and the year it was painted.

The Sanders duo is raising funds for the project via Kickstarter, and so far they've raised nearly $1500 of their $2000 goal. The fundraising campaign ends June 14.

Scroll down to see more photos of the chart, plus a video showing how it was made.

Details of the Van Gogh chart
Curious Charts

Details of the Van Gogh chart
Curious Charts

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