What to Expect From the ‘Bomb Cyclone’ Set to Pummel the East Coast

Timothy A. Clary, Getty Images
Timothy A. Clary, Getty Images

We're just a few days into the new year, and a winter storm of historic strength is already churning up the East Coast. As The Washington Post reports, the weather event has the potential to be the most severe storm in decades to form over the waters east of New England at this time of year.

The storm is being described as a "winter hurricane" and a "bomb cyclone"—terms that rival "snowpocalypse." But it's more than just dramatic weather lingo. Unlike blizzards that form over land, this one is powered by the Atlantic Ocean and is expected to drop to Hurricane Sandy-level atmospheric pressure within 24 hours. As pressure decreases more rapidly, the storm grows more intense in a process called bombogeneis (hence the "bomb" part of "bomb cyclone"). If it follows current projections, the storm will blanket the coast in dense, fast-falling sheets of snow.

The storm is already blasting southeastern states with rare ice and snow, prompting winter storm warnings in northern Florida for the first time in years. As it makes its way up the coast, the system will continue to strengthen. By the time it reaches New England Thursday, it's expected to hit the region with 40 to 60 mph winds and up to a foot of snow.

While the exact trajectory remains unclear, everyone living near the northeast coast should be prepared to hunker down from late Wednesday to Thursday night. A winter storm warning has been launched for the New Jersey shore, parts of Long Island, and parts of Connecticut, and a winter storm watch is currently in effect in New York City. Major cities farther south and farther inland, including Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Washington D.C., could make it through the storm with little to no snow accumulation.

The bomb cyclone follows a wicked cold snap across the U.S. that's already claimed the lives of 11 people. Temperatures in the northeast have remained below freezing since Christmas, and the impending storm will bring even more frigid weather this week.

[h/t The Washington Post]

A Simple Trick for Defrosting Your Windshield in Less Than 60 Seconds

iStock
iStock

As beautiful as a winter snowfall can be, the white stuff is certainly not without its irritations—especially if you have to get into your car and go somewhere. As if shoveling a path to the driver’s door wasn’t enough, then you’ve got a frozen windshield with which to contend. Everyone has his or her own tricks for warming up a car in record time—including appropriately-named meteorologist Ken Weathers, who works at WATE in Knoxville, Tennessee.

A while back, Weathers shared a homemade trick for defrosting your windshield in less than 60 seconds: spray the glass with a simple solution of one part water and two parts rubbing alcohol. “The reason why this works,” according to Weathers, “is [that] rubbing alcohol has a freezing point of 128 degrees below freezing.”

Watch the spray in action below.

[h/t: Travel + Leisure]

Website Lets You Report Individuals Affected by Hurricane Michael to Search-and-Rescue Teams

Brendan Smialowski, AFP/Getty Images
Brendan Smialowski, AFP/Getty Images

When Hurricane Michael made landfall in Florida as a Category 4 hurricane on October 10, it became the strongest storm to hit the continental U.S. since 1992. Homes from Florida to Virginia have since been leveled and at least 11 people have died. With internet and phone lines down across the disaster zone, many people are desperate to know if their loved ones are safe—now there's an online tool that can help them.

If you're having trouble getting in touch with someone who was in the hurricane's path, you can report them through a new website set up by the Florida National Guard, First Coast News reports. The site asks for the person's name, gender, age, and address, as well as any life-threatening issues they may be facing, such as low oxygen or medication supplies. After you submit their information, the State Emergency Operations Center forwards it to the relevant local agency doing recovery work.

Michael moved back over the Atlantic as a post-tropical storm Friday morning following its rampage through the southeastern U.S. More than 1000 search-and-rescue workers have already been deployed in Florida alone, and the death toll is expected to rise as clean-up efforts continue across the region.

[h/t First Coast News]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER