The Most Googled Topic In Each State in 2017

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iStock

A brand new year typically calls for fresh starts, but we’d be remiss if we headed into 2018 without first looking back at the trending topics that dominated our computer screens in 2017. For those looking to indulge their digital nostalgia, The Daily Dot analyzed browsing habits across the nation by assembling a list of the year’s biggest headlines, events, and trends. They used Google Trends to determine which of these searched-for topics were the most popular in each state, and broke down their findings in a handy map.

Among 2017’s most memorable moments was the total solar eclipse that passed through the U.S. on August 21, 2017. Residents of Wyoming, Arkansas, South Carolina, and Indiana were all caught up in the viewing craze, and Googling terms related to the natural phenomenon. (Internet users in Arkansas hopefully managed to procure eclipse glasses before the big day, as they were the ones searching “Eye damage from solar eclipses.”)

Meanwhile, Floridians kept tabs on hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico, while New Mexico residents were curious about Samsung’s first foldable phone, the still-unreleased Galaxy X. Net neutrality was a hot topic in Iowa; New Hampshire residents mourned rocker Tom Petty’s October 2, 2017 death; and moviegoers in Utah couldn’t get enough of DC blockbuster Wonder WomanAnd amid 2017's numerous highs and lows, quirky topics like the Unicorn Frappuccino, a new Ken Doll’s questionable hairdo, and extinct giant penguins reigned supreme (and hopefully made people smile) in Washington, Ohio, and Michigan, respectively.

To see the most popular search term in your state, check out The Daily Dot’s full map here.

[h/t The Daily Dot]

Only Real Fashionistas Will Be Able to Identify All These Popular Patterns

Can You Solve Elon Musk's Favorite Brain Teaser?

Joe Scarnici, Getty Images/Best Events
Joe Scarnici, Getty Images/Best Events

"You're standing on the surface of the Earth. You walk one mile south, one mile west, and one mile north. You end up exactly where you started. Where are you?" This is the question that entrepreneur Elon Musk reportedly likes to ask candidates who interview for positions at SpaceX. The brainteaser was divulged in a 2015 biography about Musk, but it was recently revived when CNBC took to the streets of New York City to see if random passersby could get it right.

Before we reveal the answer below, a bit of background first. Big companies—especially ones in the technology industry—have been known to ask tricky interview questions that read like riddles. In the past, Google interviewees have been asked, "How many people are using Facebook in San Francisco at 2:30 p.m. on a Friday?" Hewlett-Packard has opted for the question, "If Germans were the tallest people in the world, how would you prove it?" And you've probably heard some variation of a question related to golf or tennis balls.

The purpose of these questions it not to make you feel dumb, but to see how you process information and solve complex problems. Interviewers are checking your analytical skills, and whether or not you arrive at the correct answer is almost secondary. But for the fun of it, keep reading to see if you nailed Musk's interview question. Are you ready? The answer is the North Pole. If you follow the directions in the question, you'd make a triangular path and end up back where you started.

There's another possible answer, but it's a little more complicated. The place in question is a circle with a one-mile circumference around the South Pole, and you'd start walking one mile north of it. "You'll walk one mile south to reach this circle, trace that mile-long circle's path, and return one mile north to your starting point," CNBC notes. (If you're having trouble visualizing it, check out this video from Business Insider, which offers a handy illustration.)

If you didn't get it right, don't feel too bad. Most of the New Yorkers who were polled didn't know the answer, either. Fortunately, this question probably won't come up in your average interview.

[h/t CNBC]

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