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Brian Brettschneider
Brian Brettschneider

This Road Trip Puts You in Blissful 70°F Weather for a Full Year

Brian Brettschneider
Brian Brettschneider

Humans love it when the temperature hovers around 70℉. We’re more productive at work, babies sleep better at night, and tourists worldwide think [PDF] it’s the ideal temperature for a visit (except for beach vacations). When the mercury rises above 70℉, our unhappiness shoots up too.

But you don’t have to stay in the climate-controlled indoors to maintain this optimum temperature. Climatologist Brian Brettschneider created a 13,235-mile road trip through North America that keeps you in 70℉ weather every day for a full year.

Using weather data from the National Center for Environmental Information and Environment Canada, Brettschneider plotted a route through places that have a daily high average of 70℉. (It will likely get cooler at night.)

The trip begins on January 1 in southernmost Texas. Get comfortable, because you’ll be in the Lone Star State for three months. On April 1, head east, arriving in Washington D.C. a month later. Now head northwest through Chicago, Wisconsin, and much of Canada; you’ll log a whopping 3873 miles in June on your way to Alaska. Return south as far as Portland, Oregon, then head back east through the Plains as far as Missouri. You’ll be there in late October. Spend the fall crossing west again. Celebrate New Year’s Eve in San Diego.

In all, you’ll pass through 31 states and three Canadian provinces.

If you want a shorter trip, Brettschneider also created a 9125-mile route that still begins in Texas and ends in California but omits Canada and Alaska.

9949-mile road trip map through 70-degree weather

And for those of you who like it hotter, he also plotted a 9949-mile trip that follows average daily high temperatures of 80℉. That map includes the 70℉ route in case you want to cool down.

9125-mile road trip map through 80-degree weather

It’s unlikely that you’ll see Brettschneider, who lives in Anchorage, Alaska, along the route—at least anywhere in the Lower 48. "I love the snow," he told CityLab.

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Dream Job Alert: WOW Air Wants to Pay You to Move to Iceland and Travel the World
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iStock

WOW Air, the airline already known for its cheap flights to Iceland, has outdone themselves with their latest travel opportunity. According to Travel + Leisure, WOW wants to pay one lucky globetrotter and a friend to spend the summer traveling the world from Iceland.

After moving to an apartment in downtown Reykjavik, the new travel guide and a companion of their choice will be sent on eight WOW Air trips abroad and four within Iceland. During their adventures, the guide will be responsible documenting each spot they visit with photos, vlogs, and Instagram stories. This "digital travel guide" will give aspiring travelers an inside look at the food, culture, and cost of each destination on their agenda. The job, which lasts from June 1 to August 15, comes with a $4000 a month salary and free transportation and housing.

WOW Air is based in Iceland, but the airline takes passengers to cities around the world. Paris, Barcelona, Los Angeles, and Tel Aviv are just a few of the 36 locations on its destination list.

Candidates who are 18 years or older and have a Facebook profile can apply for the epic summer job by creating a two-minute video travel guide of their hometown. Applications are due May 14, and the winner will be announced May 18. If you aren't lucky enough to secure the gig, there's still time left to plan a summer trip to Iceland on your own.

[h/t Travel + Leisure]

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See the Spot That Inspired Sleeping Beauty's Castle
Sean Gallup/Getty Images
Sean Gallup/Getty Images

When Walt and Lillian Disney took a European vacation prior to the construction of Disneyland, they were particularly inspired by one location in southwest Bavaria, Germany: Neuschwanstein Castle. Built by King of Bavaria Ludwig II starting in 1869, the castle was meant to have serious dramatic flair; the king hired a stage designer from Munich, Christian Jank, to design it.

Walt Disney went on to use Neuschwanstein as the basis for Sleeping Beauty's castle in Disneyland, but Ludwig II—known as the "fairytale king" for his love of plays, stories, and music—had far from a fairy-tale ending. In fact, he only lived in the still-unfinished castle for six months before his cabinet had him declared insane and replaced him. He died under mysterious circumstances, found drowned in waist-deep water, not long after.

You can learn more about the castle, and see some beautiful footage, in this video from Great Big Story.

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