An AI Program Wrote Harry Potter Fan Fiction—and the Results Are Hilarious

Andreas Rentz/Getty Images
Andreas Rentz/Getty Images

“The castle ground snarled with a wave of magically magnified wind.”

So begins the 13th chapter of the latest Harry Potter installment, a text called Harry Potter and the Portrait of What Looked Like a Large Pile of Ash. OK, so it’s not a J.K. Rowling original—it was written by artificial intelligence. As The Verge explains, the computer-science whizzes at Botnik Studios created this three-page work of fan fiction after training an algorithm on the text of all seven Harry Potter books.

The short chapter was made with the help of a predictive text algorithm designed to churn out phrases similar in style and content to what you’d find in one of the Harry Potter novels it "read." The story isn’t totally nonsensical, though. Twenty human editors chose which AI-generated suggestions to put into the chapter, wrangling the predictive text into a linear(ish) tale.

While magnified wind doesn’t seem so crazy for the Harry Potter universe, the text immediately takes a turn for the absurd after that first sentence. Ron starts doing a “frenzied tap dance,” and then he eats Hermione’s family. And that’s just on the first page. Harry and his friends spy on Death Eaters and tussle with Voldemort—all very spot-on Rowling plot points—but then Harry dips Hermione in hot sauce, and “several long pumpkins” fall out of Professor McGonagall.

Some parts are far more simplistic than Rowling would write them, but aren’t exactly wrong with regards to the Harry Potter universe. Like: “Magic: it was something Harry Potter thought was very good.” Indeed he does!

It ends with another bit of prose that’s not exactly Rowling’s style, but it’s certainly an accurate analysis of the main current that runs throughout all the Harry Potter books. It reads: “‘I’m Harry Potter,’ Harry began yelling. ‘The dark arts better be worried, oh boy!’”

Harry Potter isn’t the only work of fiction that Jamie Brew—a former head writer for ClickHole and the creator of Botnik’s predictive keyboard—and other Botnik writers have turned their attention to. Botnik has previously created AI-generated scripts for TV shows like The X-Files and Scrubs, among other ridiculous machine-written parodies.

To delve into all the magical fiction that Botnik users have dreamed up, follow the studio on Twitter.

[h/t The Verge]

South Dakota’s Flintstones Theme Park Has Been Demolished

Tbennert, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 3.0 (cropped)
Tbennert, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 3.0 (cropped)

Fans of The Flintstones have said their final goodbyes to Bamm-Bamm, Fred, Pebbles, and other longtime residents of South Dakota's Bedrock City. As the local NewsCenter1 station reports, the quirky roadside attraction in the city of Custer—which closed down in 2015—has now been bulldozed.

Located about 40 miles from Rapid City in South Dakota's Black Hills, the attraction was the first Flintstones-themed park to open, in 1966. It featured a "Mt. Rockmore" structure, a 20-foot Dino statue, Fred's Flintmobile car, and other replicas of the houses and characters made famous by the cartoon. Now, all that remains are the memories shared by the many families who visited the roadside attraction over the years.

There's some good news, though. Visitors will have one last chance to visit Bedrock City's sister location in Arizona, located along Route 64 near the Grand Canyon. "We have been making needed repairs and will open the campground soon," a representative of Raptor Ranch, a new attraction slated to take over the Bedrock City site, tells Mental Floss. "We are closed now, but will open soon. This will likely be the last year to see the Bedrock buildings before the remodel."

The Arizona Bedrock City shut down in January after 47 years of operations. The new owner, Troy Morris, announced plans to convert the property into a park where visitors can learn about birds of prey and watch flight demonstrations. The upcoming attraction's Facebook page shared photos of the progress, while also attempting to find future homes for the Flintstones crew.

The date of the Bedrock City campground's reopening is yet to be announced, but keep checking the Raptor Ranch Facebook page for updates.

[h/t NewsCenter1]

Bran Reveals Meaning of the Three-Eyed Raven and How That Impacts Future of Westeros

Helen Sloan/HBO
Helen Sloan/HBO

Earlier this year, Night King actor Vladimir Furdik confirmed that his Game of Thrones character "has a target he wants to kill," and it appears that last night's episode, "A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms," may have revealed who that person is: Bran Stark, who is now the Three-Eyed Raven. In a meeting before the dead march on Winterfell, Bran says, “He’ll come for me. He’s tried before. Many times, with many Three-eyed Ravens.”

When explaining why it's him the Night King wants, Bran revealed what the Three-Eyed Raven does, and what his death would mean for Westeros.

According to Bran, the Night King's goal is "An endless night. He wants to erase this world." Bran goes on to say, "I am its memory," referring to the fact that he, as the Three-Eyed Raven, knows everything that has happened in the history of Westeros. To this, Sam Tarly replies, "Memories don’t come from books. And your stories aren’t just stories. If I wanted to erase the world of men, I’d start with you.”

The Night King was able to get his hands on Bran in a vision, and Bran is permanently marked from the encounter, which means the Night King always knows where he is. Now, Bran—guarded by Theon—will serve as bait to lure the Night King into Winterfell.

Could this be foreshadowing the fact that Bran won't see the end of the season? We'll just have to wait and see what's coming in episode three and beyond.

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