9 Towns Across the World With Christmas-Themed Names

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iStock

In some towns, Christmas doesn’t only come once a year. In Christmas, Michigan, it’s a year-round presence. And that’s not the only municipality with a December 25-inspired name. Here are nine places named for Christmas across the globe:

1. SANTA CLAUS, INDIANA

A statue of Santa Claus stands above a ‘Welcome to Santa Claus, Indiana’ sign.

TENGRRL, Flickr // CC BY-SA 2.0

There are actually several places in the U.S. named after St. Nick, but only one of them is famous for the Santa Claus postmark. That’s Santa Claus, Indiana, a city of just under 2500 people located in the southwest portion of the state. When settlers created the town in the mid-1800s, they were going to name it Santa Fe—but since another Indiana town already had that name, when the residents gathered one Christmas Eve to decide upon its permanent moniker, they went with the seasonally appropriate Santa Claus. Now, the city calls itself “America’s Christmas Hometown” and boasts Yuletide attractions like the Santa Claus Museum and Village, a hotel called Santa’s Lodge, the Santa Claus Christmas Store, and Santa’s Candy Castle, which claims the title of the first themed attraction in the U.S. Not to mention all the letters to Santa its post office receives each December.

2. BARRA DE NAVIDAD, MEXICO

A view from offshore of a beach in Barra de Navidad, Mexico.
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Barra de Navidad, Jalisco, a beach town on Mexico’s Pacific coast, is located along a sandbar—hence its name, which means Christmas Sandbar. The mellow town of about 5000 people was once a hub for Spanish ships. It was originally named Puerto de Navidad because the first Spanish explorers who landed there in the 1500s arrived on Christmas Day. The name was changed to Barra de Navidad once the town on the sandbar was built. Now, it's a fishing village and popular tourist destination whose picturesque beaches make it a perfect late-December getaway for those trying to flee cold weather.

3. CHRISTMAS, MICHIGAN

A sign reads ‘Welcome to Christmas, Michigan.’
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Christmas, Michigan, home to just 400 residents, was named for the holiday gift factory once located there. The town in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula is now a popular recreation area for snowmobile aficionados, and it takes full advantage of its Christmas legacy. With roadside Santa statues and its Santa-themed stores and signs, Christmas will never let you forget which holiday it’s named after.

4. NATAL, BRAZIL

A view across the skyline of Natal, Brazil
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Natal, which means Christmas in Portuguese, is a state capital on the easternmost tip of Brazil, and serves as South America’s closest point to Africa. Built just outside a 16th-century Portuguese fort called the Fortress of the Three Wise Men (also called the Three Kings Fortress), the city was founded on December 25, 1599. It has since become a popular beach destination for Brazilian tourists.

5. NORTH POLE, OKLAHOMA

An evelope that reads 'North Pole' sticks out from a red mailbox.
iStock

Of all the places to name after the North Pole, you wouldn’t necessarily pick a tiny town in southeastern Oklahoma. Residents of the rural region aren’t sure how an Oklahoma town got an Arctic name. According to NewsOK, the late owner of the local North Pole Grocery thought it might have to do with the area being colder than other parts of the county, while other residents speculate that it could have been named for its out-of-the-way location, which might seem as far away as the North Pole for travelers.

6. SINT-NIKLAAS, BELGIUM

The town hall of Sint-Niklaas, Belgium seen from afar
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The East Flanders city of Sint-Niklaas gets its name from the church founded there in the early 13th century, not the jolly bearer of Christmas presents, but the town definitely knows how to appreciate Santa Claus—or rather, his predecessor, Sinterklaas (Saint Nicholas). There’s a statue of the holiday figure posted outside the city hall year-round, and between November 12 and December 6 (Saint Nicholas’s Day), the city’s fine arts museum turns into the Huis van de Sint, or the “House of the Saint,” where kids can tour Sinterklaas’s house and meet the big guy himself. Sinterklaas comes to visit the children of Sint-Niklaas on the weekend prior to December 6, and local elementary schools get a three-day weekend so that kids can play with their new toys afterward.

7. NOEL, MISSOURI

A vintage postcard shows a highway leading into the town of Noel, Missouri.
OZARK POSTCARD PUBLISHERS, Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

The town of Noel wasn’t named after Christmas—the designation originally referred to local sawmill owners C.W. and W.J. Noel—but it has certainly embraced the association. In the 1930s, Noel’s post office began offering a Christmas postmark service, stamping cards and letters sent through the town with a Christmas-themed postmark that says “The Christmas City in the Ozark Vacation Land.” Each year, the post office receives around 50,000 pieces of mail from people all around the world asking for these stamps, and the local postmaster has to employ a team of volunteers to process them all in time for the holiday.

8. BETHLEHEM, PENNSYLVANIA

This Pennsylvania town owes the origin of its name to Christmas Eve. In 1741, a group of Moravians—a Protestant denomination founded in the 1400s—settled near the banks of Pennsylvania’s Lehigh River. These settlers had a patron, the German count Nicholas Ludwig von Zinzendorf, and when he visited on Christmas Eve, 1741, he proclaimed that the town would be named Bethlehem. In 1937, Bethlehem’s chamber of commerce decided to make the most of the name, declaring it America’s Christmas City. It’s now known for its extensive annual Christmas market.

9. BETHLEHEM, WALES

A sign welcomes visitors to Bethlehem, Wales in both English and Welsh.

JOHN FINCH, Geograph // CC BY-SA 2.0

Pennsylvania isn’t the only place to lay claim to the Bethlehem name. Its Welsh compatriot, though, owes even more to the Christmas spirit. Bethlehem, Wales is a tiny village that boasted just 150 people in 2012. It’s so small, in fact, that in the 1980s, its only post office got shut down by budget cuts. But the high demand for the Bethlehem postmark forced it to reopen in 2002. Though it’s typically only open a few hours a week, in order to cope with the high volume of mail people send in during the Christmas season the post office has longer hours during the holidays.

This Travel Mug Lets You Alternate Between Sipping Cold Water and Hot Coffee

H2Joe, Kickstarter

You no longer have to choose between your health and your sanity when deciding what to drink in the morning. H2Joe, a water bottle-travel mug hybrid currently raising funds on Kickstarter, lets you drink water and coffee from the same bottle while keeping both liquids separate at their ideal temperatures all day.

A cross-section of the H2Joe water/coffee bottle
H2Joe

Though it looks like a single container, H2Joe is really two vessels in one. The bottom portion is a double-walled, stainless steel travel mug designed for 12 ounces of hot coffee or tea. The top is the 12-ounce reusable water bottle. The H2Joe's triple-insulated design keeps water cool for up to eight hours at a time and the coffee hot for up to six hours, even when these liquids are stored just a few centimeters away from each other at vastly different temperatures.

The lid has one opening for each container: a spout with a screw cap for water and a flip top for hot liquids like coffee and tea. The lid and bottom mug twist off, making each vessel east to refill, and all the components are dishwasher-safe.

Water and coffee pour out of the H2Joe's lid
H2Joe

After launching a crowdfunding campaign on February 12, H2Joe reached its goal of $20,000 in just two hours. Hikers, commuters, and anyone else who's looking to consolidate the travel containers in their life have until March 15 to reserve a bottle on Kickstarter. H2Joe bottles are available for pledges of $36 or more, with shipping set for October 2019.

All Aboard! Mexico Is Now Home to an All-You-Can-Drink Tequila Train

iStock.com/Clicknique
iStock.com/Clicknique

If you like the idea of taking a booze cruise or imbibing while flying (on a craft beer flight, that is), then you may enjoy the hooch caboose. As Delish reports, the latest in luxury, alcohol-packed travel comes from Jose Cuervo, which is now operating an all-you-can-drink tequila train.

That’s right: You can now hop aboard the Jose Cuervo Express and slam shots or sip tequila sunrises while traveling in style from Guadalajara in western Mexico to—where else?—the city of Tequila. The deal includes round-trip train transportation and bottomless drinks at the open tequila bar, plus snacks. Guests will also get to join a separate tequila tasting with experts, take a tour of the Jose Cuervo distillery in Tequila (the oldest one in the Americas), and take in a Mexican cultural show.

The Jose Cuervo Express has been around a while, but the round-trip, all-you-can-drink tequila experience is new. Since 2012, the train has been operating regular “sunrise” and “sunset” hours, offering guests a morning train ride to Tequila with an evening bus ride back to Guadalajara, and vice versa.

Prices for the new experience start from $111 on the Travel Pirates website, but the cost depends on the exact package you choose. If tequila isn’t your cup of tea, you might prefer the Mayan train line that’s slated to connect some of Mexico’s most famous pyramids and sites. Those plans are still a work in progress, though.

[h/t Delish]

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