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How to Walk Across Hot Coals

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People have been scampering across hot coals for thousands of years. A bed of embers can exceed 1000°F, and the world’s hottest firewalk in 1997 actually topped 1750°F—the same temperature used for cremations. But with the right preparation, experts prance across them with barely a blister. Here’s how they do it.

1) Get Wood

A safe walk requires the right coals, usually cherry or maple wood. Hardwoods are excellent insulators, and they’ll protect feet from some of the heat—even when they’re aflame. (That’s why the wooden handle on a saucepan stays cool when you’re cooking.) Cherry or maple embers also glow a daunting red-orange, but they actually don’t burn as hot as other charcoals, like olive or locust woods.

2) Build a Runway

Once the fire has burnt down, rake the coals. This step makes the red-hot landing strip of doom look even more terrifying, but it will actually spread cold charcoal to the surface, adding insulation. Firewalkers also flatten the coals. Patting down a path keeps them from sinking into the sizzling embers, protecting the sensitive tops of your feet.

3) Break Out a Good Book

After making the fire, firewalkers need to kill time for about 20 minutes. Embers that still hold water can transfer heat to feet faster. Letting the coals dry means they won’t sear any soles. Then they sprinkle a thin layer of ash on top. Ash is a terrible heat conductor, and it can block some warmth radiating from the coals.

4) Just Add Water

After waiting for the bed to cool to a balmy 1000°F walkers dip their feet in some water. When liquid meets intense heat, it can form an insulating layer of steam. It’s called the leidenfrost effect, and it’s why you can snuff out a candle’s flame with two wet fingers. The moisture may act as a protective glove for feet.

5) Walk, Don’t Run

Once experts step onto the coals, they walk briskly and don’t stop. Their feet would sink into the ashpit if they run or hard-step. The lighter the stride, the less chance scorching cinders will wedge between their toes. Each step should last half a second or less.

6) Believe in Physics.

Coals may be hot, but they’re terrible at transferring heat. They have a “low thermal capacity.” That is, it takes them relatively long time to bake a walker. (It’s like sticking your hand in an oven set to 400°F. The air feels hot, but it won’t burn you instantly.) As long as they keep moving, each step will absorb very little heat from the embers.

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11-Headed Buddha Statue to Be Revealed in Japan for First Time in 33 Years
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Buddha statues come in all sorts of shapes and sizes. The various poses and hand gestures of the Buddha represent different virtues, and any items he happens to be holding—say, a lotus flower or a bowl—have some religious significance.

But not all Buddha relics are created equal, as evidenced by the reverence paid to one particularly holy statue in Japan. The 11-headed figure is so sacred that it has been hidden away for 33 years—until now. Lonely Planet reports that the Buddha statue will be revealed on April 23 during the Onsen Festival in Kinosaki Onsen, a coastal town along the Sea of Japan that’s famous for its hot springs. The statue is kept inside Onsen-ji Temple, a religious site which dates back to 738 CE.

Al altar inside Onsen-ji temple

Patrick Vierthaler, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0

The big Buddha reveal, however, will be held elsewhere. For that, festivalgoers will need to ride a cable car to the top of Mount Taishi, where they’ll catch a glimpse of Juichimen Kanzeon Bosatsu, a name which means “11-faced goddess of compassion and mercy.” It will be hard to miss—at 7 feet tall, the statue would tower over most NBA players. Considered a natural treasure, it’s displayed in three-year blocks once every 33 years. So if you miss the initial reveal, you have until 2021 to catch a glimpse.

“The people of Kinosaki are very excited about this event, especially the younger generation," Jade Nunez, an international relations coordinator for the neighboring city of Toyooka, told Lonely Planet Travel News. "Those who are under 30 years old have never seen the statue in its entirety, so the event is especially important to them."

After paying their respects to the Buddha, festival attendees can take a dip in one of three hot spring bathhouses that will be free to use during the Onsen Festival.

[h/t Lonely Planet]

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All National Parks Are Offering Free Admission on April 21
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Looking for something to do this weekend that's both outdoorsy and free? To kick off National Park Week, you can visit any one of the National Park Service's more than 400 parks on April 21, 2018 for free.

While the majority of the NPS's parks are free year-round, they'll be waiving admission fees to the more than 100 parks that normally require an entrance fee. Which means that you can pay a visit to the Grand Canyon, Death Valley, Yosemite, or Yellowstone National Parks without reaching for your wallet. The timing couldn't be better, as many of the country's most popular parks will be increasing their entrance fees beginning in June.

The National Park Service, which celebrated its 100th birthday in 2016, maintains 417 designated NPS areas that span more than 84 million acres across every state, plus Washington, D.C., American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands.

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