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The World’s Longest Yard Sale Is This Week

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Every August, a quiet country road transforms into a bustling trail of attic knickknacks—a 690-mile-long yard sale. 

U.S. Route 127 is a modest two lane highway snaking through Kentucky’s rural backcountry. You can drive miles on it without ever seeing another car. But for four days each year, the highway can clog with bumper-to-bumper traffic. It becomes host to the super bowl of scavenging, a massive rummage-fest that stretches across six states from Gadsden, Alabama to Addison, Michigan.

Welcome to the World’s Longest Yard Sale.

The annual sale was started in 1987 to peel drivers off the main drag and onto Tennessee and Kentucky’s scenic back roads. Now in its 26th year, it attracts hundreds of thousands of shoppers, pickers, and junkyard anthropologists. You can find just about anything there: Antiques and Americana, bargains and bric-a-brac, trinkets, treasures, and second-hand souvenirs. 

And did we mention all the fried dough?

If you’re not interested in the six state shopping spree, the drive is still worth it. The sale’s southern end glides along the Lookout Mountain Parkway, rated one of the most scenic rural roads in the United States.

So if you have a hankering for a multi-state flea market or are just hungry for a weekend road trip, check out the World’s Largest Yard Sale this week. It officially starts Thursday, August 1, and runs until Sunday.

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In Pursuit of Guinness Fame, Two Men Ride the Entire Boston Subway System in Record-Setting Time
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Two intrepid commuters may have ridden the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) all the way into the Guinness World Records, according to The Boston Globe. On Friday, August 18, locals Alex Cox and Dominic DiLuzio visited every single stop in the city's subway system (more than 125 stations) in a little under 7.5 hours. The record they hope to snag—completing the journey in the fastest time possible— is both unofficial and brand-new, but the two hope to make it an official Guinness World Record category once they submit photos, videos, a log book, and other documentation.

DiLuzio conceived the stunt more than two years ago, after learning of another Beantown resident who completed the challenge in about 8 hours, simply for bragging rights. Cox, who works for the Massachusetts Department of Transportation, was fair game for the project, so DiLuzio recruited him as a partner after submitting an application to Guinness.

On August 18, after months of planning, DiLuzio and Cox woke up bright and early to board a 5:24 a.m. Red Line train at Alewife Station. Amid much jostling, running, bladder-holding, and live-tweeting, the duo finished the entire Red Line in just 90 minutes, before tackling the Mattapan, Orange, Green, and Blue lines. During the final stretch of the trip, the record-seekers were joined by some MBTA officials, according to New England Cable News.

Right before 1 p.m., DiLuzio and Cox reached the Blue Line’s Wonderland stop, signaling the end of their journey. There, they celebrated the ride—which was reportedly around 15 minutes shorter than their predecessor's attempt—with friends, MBTA officials, and media.

“I think everything went incredibly smoothly. We didn’t have any major delays, any breakdowns,” Cox said, according to CBS Boston. "A couple of hiccups here and there, but we stuck exactly to our plan and I can’t believe we did it in the time that we did."

In a few months, DiLuzio and Cox will find out if their subway hustle scored them a Guinness Record, placing them among company like lawyer Matthew Ahn, who rode all 469 New York City subway stops in under 22 hours. In the meantime, the MBTA—which didn’t sponsor or help plan the effort—is cheering the duo on.

[h/t The Boston Globe]

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Adult-Sized Little Tikes-Inspired Car Spotted in UK
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Remember scooting around town in your red and yellow Little Tikes toy car? The fun plastic vehicle offered accessible mobility like a tricycle, but with the sophistication of a real car. It was never meant to be driven outside of the cul-de-sac, but what if there was a grown-up version that could be taken out on the road?

Mechanic John Bitmead and his brother Geoff of Attitude Autos created just that back in 2015, with an oversized spin on the classic kid wheels. It's road-legal and fully functional, looking somewhat similar to a Smart Car (but way cooler). The car was adapted from a Daewoo Matiz and took 16 weeks to make. Despite its small size, it can go up to 70 miles per hour.

This nostalgic creation eventually wound up on eBay for bids of at least £21,500 (roughly $33,000). It only had 5000 miles on it. Sadly, it seems the vehicle went unsold. But Bitmead doesn't appear to be finished with his unique customs. His Instagram page features a post-apocalyptic roadster with a bright pink Hello Kitty paint job. If you live in the UK, perhaps one day you'll see the two racing during your morning commute.

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