For the First Time Ever, Rome's Barberini Tomb is Now Open to the Public

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In addition to the Coliseum and the Roman Forum, tourists exploring Rome and Italy’s greater Lazio region can now be among the first public visitors to ever step inside an important ancient tomb. As Lonely Planet reports, the two-story vault, known as the Barberini Tomb, dates back to the 2nd century BCE. After receiving a much-needed facelift, it’s now open to history lovers for the very first time.

During the mid-19th century, scholars excavated a group of elaborate Roman tombs at the ancient Italian city of Praeneste, also known as Palestrina. Situated along the Via Latina, an important Roman road, they contained fine furniture, golden jewelry, and other luxurious items. These structures included the Barberini Tomb, which is also referred to as the Corneli Tomb. Today, it’s the only one among this group that's still largely intact.

The Barberini Tomb received its name from the princely Barberini family, who were the last known landowners of the surrounding estate. (Today, this land is part of a public archaeological park.) It’s well preserved “because through the centuries it was always used as a shelter for agriculture and sheep-farming purposes, up through the 1800s," said Francesca Montella, the archaeologist in charge of the Barberini Tomb’s restoration, according to the Agenzia Nazionale Stampa Associata.

In addition to its two stories, the Barberini Tomb contains an underground funerary chamber with a mosaic floor, which once contained a stunning Roman sarcophagus. (It was moved to the Vatican Museums during the 1700s.) There are also frescoes portraying animals, plants, and mythological figures.

Conservators spent two years restoring the Barberini Tomb, a process that included installing a lighting system and rebuilding its staircase and collapsed ground floor. The nearly $300,000 project will be completed sometime in 2018, but in November the tomb opened to visitors, who can now make reservations to take a guided tour of the building.

[h/t Lonely Planet]

Want to Get a Free Hotel Room? Plan a Stopover

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A stopover isn't the first choice of most travelers. Instead of getting you to your final destination as quickly as possible, a stopover flight can delay your vacation by anywhere from one to five nights. But there's a good reason to reconsider this common airline annoyance: Booking a stopover—a layover lasting 24 hours or more—is one of the easiest ways to snag a heavily discounted hotel room, according to Thrillist.

When planning your next plane trip, see what stopover options are available on the route. Many airlines offer detours to major tourist destinations: Tokyo, Dubai, and Singapore are just a few examples.

After you've booked the flight, just make sure you go through the airline to book your hotel to receive a generous discount. The discount often adds up to hundreds of dollars. If you reserve the flight and hotel as a packaged deal through a travel booking site, the savings can be the equivalent of free airfare or accommodations.

Flyers end up saving big on stopover flights, but the airline's hubs can benefit as well. The stopover itself brings new tourists into a city where the airline is based, and the hotel discounts encourage them to leave the airport and spend money on local attractions.

If you're planning a vacation and want to add an extra destination that won't blow your budget, check to see if the airline you're using has a page dedicated to stopover deals.

[h/t Thrillist]

Wasps Are Getting Drunk and Terrorizing People in England

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Go home, wasps. You’re drunk.

Thousands of “boozy wasps” are terrorizing the UK after imbibing the nectar of fermented fruit and cider left behind at pub gardens, Travel + Leisure reports. Experts warn that there’s a greater risk of getting stung at this time of year, especially while boozing outdoors or eating sweet foods.

The sudden change in diet highlights an issue with the insects' food supply: Wasps typically drink a kind of sugar-spit produced by larvae, but the hive queens have already stopped laying larvae by this time of year, and wasps have been unable to get their fill. They also carry a genetic trait that makes them go crazy for sugary foods and alcohol, and other factors have escalated the problem. For one, last year's cold winter translated to an early wasp season, which allowed them to build larger-than-normal nests.

"Wasps have built absolutely massive nests and, now that all the larvae have grown up and the queen has stopped laying eggs, the colonies have a workforce with nothing to do—and nothing to eat," pest control expert Shane Jones told the Daily Mail. "So they go down to the pub, obviously."

What they really want is sugar, which can be found in fermented fruit, cider, and fruity beers. Because wasps are lightweights, just one sip will get them drunk—and you don’t want to see them when they’re tipsy. "Wasps can't handle their booze, so they get tanked-up and fighty—like lager louts,” Jones says. Alcohol can make the insects more irritable and more likely to sting people.

The best way to avoid the problem, according to Dee Ward-Thompson, technical manager at the British Pest Control Association, is to keep the sugary goodies they're craving out of sight. “Maybe the most influential factor on wasp numbers is when people do not dispose of their waste properly, especially food with a high sugar content, such as fruit," Ward-Thompson told the Nottingham Post. “We always advise waste to be securely bagged and held within a clean container, away from where young children might play.”

[h/t Travel + Leisure]

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