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Denny’s Beer Barrel Pub

7 Very Big Burgers

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Denny’s Beer Barrel Pub

What’s better than a big, juicy burger, piled high with all the fixings? An even bigger burger. Some restaurants have taken the “bigger is better” philosophy to heart, crafting monstrous lunch options that take special spatulas to flip, multiple servers to carry, and a whole team of people to consume. Take a deep breath, and let’s dive in to some of the most infamous heavyweight burger contenders. Burger King’s so-called “Whoppers” have nothing on these.

Vegans and vegetarians, turn back now. There’s nothing here for you.

1. The T-Rex – Wendy’s

That picture isn’t Photoshopped. A Reddit user took a picture of a genuine menu item that was sold at a single Canadian Wendy’s franchise, consisting of nine patties sitting neatly atop each other in a stack surely too large to fit into anyone’s mouth, no matter how hard they try. The T-Rex originated as a joke, fake-advertised in an old issue of Sports Illustrated (as recreated on the menu board pictured above), which inspired customers to try their luck at ordering it in real life. A Wendy’s in Canada’s Manitoba province readily complied—until abruptly pulling the 2-pound, 4-ounce behemoth, possibly due to pressure from the corporation after the burger went viral online. The T-Rex, now extinct, will nonetheless live on in burger history.

2. The 911 – Wiener and Still Champion

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Tucked away on the second page of a menu that also boasts country-fried bacon and deep-fried pickle chips, Chicago-area restaurant Wiener and Still Champion’s 911 burger is a three-pound behemoth with nine patties and eleven slices of cheese. It’s otherwise known as the “Triple Undisputed,” the largest of three “Undisputed” burgers, the smallest of which starts at a comparatively reasonable one pound—advertised as “only for the very hungry.” There’s no such suggestion for the double and triple varieties, probably because the owners couldn’t conceive of a single customer hungry enough to actually order them. Ironically, the restaurant isn’t even mainly a burger joint—as the name suggests, they’re hot dog people.

3. Mount Olympus – Clinton Station Diner

David Ciancio/Burger Conquest

Like Wiener and Still Champion, New Jersey’s Clinton Station Diner offers a range of burger sizes to accommodate customers of varying degrees of acute starvation, starting at a not-so-petite one pound, called the “Achilles.” The mythological reference is intentional, as the names of its larger burger brethren make clear: The next size up is the 2-pound Hercules, followed by the 3-pound Atlas. Zeus is a burger meant to be shared: The restaurant challenges diners to either finish the entire 7-pound thing in three hours or less, or to bring a friend to help get it down in an hour and a half.

As if a burger roughly the weight of a healthy newborn baby weren’t enough, Clinton Station Diner’s crowning glory is Mount Olympus (shown here), which isn’t pulling any punches with its name: At an even 50 pounds before the bun and assorted toppings, the restaurant’s flagship burger would incur overweight baggage fees on most airlines. It’s so big that if a team of five with big dreams and even bigger stomachs manage to suffer through it all in under three hours, the burger is free, and the restaurant will pay them $1000 on top of that. Start training, burger-lovers.

4. Beer Barrel Belly Bruiser – Denny’s Beer Barrel Pub

Denny’s Beer Barrel Pub

Not to be confused with the 24/7 restaurant chain, Denny’s Beer Barrel Pub is home to the most outrageous burger challenges in Pennsylvania. Their burgers come in varying degrees of difficulty, from the 2-pound Pub Challenger to the 25-pound Beer Barrel Burgenator, which requires the challenge participants to call ahead at least 72 hours in advance.

Their most ambitious menu offering, however, is another thing entirely: Their website warns that the 50-pound Belly Bruiser is “not a ‘challenge,’” instructing them to consult a server for further details—and probably a liability waiver just for letting the thought cross their mind. It sounds like Denny’s owners know that so much meat can only end in tears.

5. World’s Biggest Burger  – Black Bear Casino Resort

Black Bear Casino Resort

At what point is a burger no longer a burger, but simply an enormous pile of meat and bread? Apparently, no one has gotten that far yet, since the largest burger in the world currently tops out 2014 pounds and has remained uncontested since its victory in September 2012. The reigning champion was additionally topped with “60 pounds of bacon, 50 pounds of lettuce, 50 pounds of sliced onions, 40 pounds of pickles, and 40 pounds of cheese” and measured 10 feet across, from one end of the bun to the other. The burger was not only a culinary wonder, but an architectural one: the feat of flipping the immense patty required the assistance of a mechanical crane. The Guiness World Record adjudicator reported that the burger “actually taste[d] really good.”

6. Absolutely Ridiculous Burger – Mallie’s Sports Grill & Bar

Mallie’s Sports Grill & Bar

It’s no one-ton burger, but hometown favorite Mallie’s in Michigan has broken the record for largest commercially available burger three times, most recently in 2012 with its 1000-pound masterpiece, created in collaboration with Tom Pizzica, host of Food Network’s Outrageous Food (above). The Absolutely Ridiculous Burger was its first successful record-holder, way back in 2008, at a relatively modest 134 pounds post-cooking. All the records Mallie’s has broken since then have been the restaurant’s own.

7. 100 x 100 – In-N-Out Burger

What Up Willy

It’s an open secret that beloved West Coast burger chain In-N-Out will customize any order within the limits of what’s in the kitchen. A Double-Double is a standard customer order, comprised of two beef patties and two slices of cheese on a standard bun. Particularly hungry patrons can spring for a triple-triple, a quadruple-quadruple, etc. One group of friends decided that standard wasn’t going to be enough for them, and boldly ordered a 100 x 100: a full hundred beef patties with as many slices of cheese, to split between the eight of them. The In-N-Out workers on shift that night obliged, and thus the group’s stomach-churning, record-setting ordeal began.

After paying the $97.66 bill and not ordering fries with that, the burger warriors collectively tackled their enormous order. To their credit, they finished it all, but not without expressing horror at the disgusting pile of “sweaty-oily cheese” clinging to the patties. Some 19,490 total calories later, at least one member of the group said he hasn’t touched In-N-Out since. There’s such a thing as too much burger.

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iStock // Ekaterina Minaeva
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Man Buys Two Metric Tons of LEGO Bricks; Sorts Them Via Machine Learning
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iStock // Ekaterina Minaeva

Jacques Mattheij made a small, but awesome, mistake. He went on eBay one evening and bid on a bunch of bulk LEGO brick auctions, then went to sleep. Upon waking, he discovered that he was the high bidder on many, and was now the proud owner of two tons of LEGO bricks. (This is about 4400 pounds.) He wrote, "[L]esson 1: if you win almost all bids you are bidding too high."

Mattheij had noticed that bulk, unsorted bricks sell for something like €10/kilogram, whereas sets are roughly €40/kg and rare parts go for up to €100/kg. Much of the value of the bricks is in their sorting. If he could reduce the entropy of these bins of unsorted bricks, he could make a tidy profit. While many people do this work by hand, the problem is enormous—just the kind of challenge for a computer. Mattheij writes:

There are 38000+ shapes and there are 100+ possible shades of color (you can roughly tell how old someone is by asking them what lego colors they remember from their youth).

In the following months, Mattheij built a proof-of-concept sorting system using, of course, LEGO. He broke the problem down into a series of sub-problems (including "feeding LEGO reliably from a hopper is surprisingly hard," one of those facts of nature that will stymie even the best system design). After tinkering with the prototype at length, he expanded the system to a surprisingly complex system of conveyer belts (powered by a home treadmill), various pieces of cabinetry, and "copious quantities of crazy glue."

Here's a video showing the current system running at low speed:

The key part of the system was running the bricks past a camera paired with a computer running a neural net-based image classifier. That allows the computer (when sufficiently trained on brick images) to recognize bricks and thus categorize them by color, shape, or other parameters. Remember that as bricks pass by, they can be in any orientation, can be dirty, can even be stuck to other pieces. So having a flexible software system is key to recognizing—in a fraction of a second—what a given brick is, in order to sort it out. When a match is found, a jet of compressed air pops the piece off the conveyer belt and into a waiting bin.

After much experimentation, Mattheij rewrote the software (several times in fact) to accomplish a variety of basic tasks. At its core, the system takes images from a webcam and feeds them to a neural network to do the classification. Of course, the neural net needs to be "trained" by showing it lots of images, and telling it what those images represent. Mattheij's breakthrough was allowing the machine to effectively train itself, with guidance: Running pieces through allows the system to take its own photos, make a guess, and build on that guess. As long as Mattheij corrects the incorrect guesses, he ends up with a decent (and self-reinforcing) corpus of training data. As the machine continues running, it can rack up more training, allowing it to recognize a broad variety of pieces on the fly.

Here's another video, focusing on how the pieces move on conveyer belts (running at slow speed so puny humans can follow). You can also see the air jets in action:

In an email interview, Mattheij told Mental Floss that the system currently sorts LEGO bricks into more than 50 categories. It can also be run in a color-sorting mode to bin the parts across 12 color groups. (Thus at present you'd likely do a two-pass sort on the bricks: once for shape, then a separate pass for color.) He continues to refine the system, with a focus on making its recognition abilities faster. At some point down the line, he plans to make the software portion open source. You're on your own as far as building conveyer belts, bins, and so forth.

Check out Mattheij's writeup in two parts for more information. It starts with an overview of the story, followed up with a deep dive on the software. He's also tweeting about the project (among other things). And if you look around a bit, you'll find bulk LEGO brick auctions online—it's definitely a thing!

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Here's How to Change Your Name on Facebook
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Whether you want to change your legal name, adopt a new nickname, or simply reinvent your online persona, it's helpful to know the process of resetting your name on Facebook. The social media site isn't a fan of fake accounts, and as a result changing your name is a little more complicated than updating your profile picture or relationship status. Luckily, Daily Dot laid out the steps.

Start by going to the blue bar at the top of the page in desktop view and clicking the down arrow to the far right. From here, go to Settings. This should take you to the General Account Settings page. Find your name as it appears on your profile and click the Edit link to the right of it. Now, you can input your preferred first and last name, and if you’d like, your middle name.

The steps are similar in Facebook mobile. To find Settings, tap the More option in the bottom right corner. Go to Account Settings, then General, then hit your name to change it.

Whatever you type should adhere to Facebook's guidelines, which prohibit symbols, numbers, unusual capitalization, and honorifics like Mr., Ms., and Dr. Before landing on a name, make sure you’re ready to commit to it: Facebook won’t let you update it again for 60 days. If you aren’t happy with these restrictions, adding a secondary name or a name pronunciation might better suit your needs. You can do this by going to the Details About You heading under the About page of your profile.

[h/t Daily Dot]

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