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Danica Johnson

11 Random Things From Our YouTube Set

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Danica Johnson

A modern re-imagining of the old-timey curiosity cabinet. That's the concept I had the pleasure of running with as the set designer for the Mental Floss on YouTube channel. My interpretation of the challenge was that it needed to be visually action-packed, but also engaging enough for our host, John Green, to interact with freely. My job (obsession and joy) then became drafting that panorama and procuring the pieces to what has since become a singular spectacle of geekery, vintage oddities, and relics of pop culture present and past. But without question, the ongoing highlight of working on this assemblage has been tucking in a bevy of special staff-loaned pieces, visual jokes, and gallery wall of rotating art to keep things ever more interesting with each episode.

From this varied and peculiar collection, the following 11 things are some of my favorites from the set we call "The Salon."

1. Model of Anatomical Male


Conceptually, this anatomy model is just really cool: Half musculature, half vascular, visible skeleton. What puts him over the top is that he's posed in way that suggests either vintage muscle mag or that he's dramatically shaking his fist at whoever it was that ganked his skin suit. Regardless, this guy is pure swag.

2. Wooden Fandom Dolls


The Venn diagram of John and Hank Green's fanbase and the energetic participation of those people in various other fandoms is basically a circle. We love fandoms. When I found the John and Hank, Dr. Who, and Sherlock wooden doll sets, I had to have them immediately. What makes these guys special is the amount of character conveyed just through simple brushwork: The hairlines, clothing detail, and sonic screwdriver props are amazing. The icing on this nerd cake is that by request, artist Kimmy Fiorentino was happy to fanboy my Hank Green doll in a C.G.P. Grey logo shirt. Purchased from Etsy shop: Maddasahatterr.

3. Super Mario Bros. Potted Piranha Plant


Chosen because potted things are welcoming as well as a basic decor move, but we also like to keep a loose grip on the element of danger as much as possible. This classic 8bit fire-spitter is the perfect combination. Purchased at Etsy shop: Geekapalooza.

4. Circus Sideshow Nesting Dolls


This beautifully hand-painted set specifically appealed to me because of John Green's previous work specializing in genetic anomalies. I nearly passed on it having convinced myself there was no way they looked as good as they did online. Instead, they’re even more stunning in-hand. Purchased at Etsy shop: Gravlax.

5. Resin-Encased Bat

This little fella is in no way a standard-definition favorite. Initially I thought the bat would help temper the potential Daycare Effect from the inclusion of a lot of toys and action figures. However, when it arrived I found myself unable to even remove him from his little box. He's on both the set and this list because the one person this thing squicks more than me is John Green, something I find mischievously enjoyable.

6. Special Edition Wonder Woman Action Figure

Another fantastic thing this project has allowed for is the indulgence of my own geekery. I'm a Wonder Woman fangirl and this 1941 replica is the best doll ever produced of my all-time favorite pop culture heroine. While that is a pretty glowing endorsement, unless Neko Case is ever made into a proper action figure of this caliber, the title will likely hold strong.

7. Hello Kitty Specimen Jar

I think of this jar as a handcrafted request for a scientific case study. Why? Because Hello Kitty doesn’t have a mouth, is British not Japanese, and a purported grade schooler who in reality is pushing 40. (Again, am I really the only one that finds her lack of a mouth incredibly disturbing?) Regardless, her global popularity is only growing stronger and stronger with time and nothing is more suspicious than cuteness. 

8. Bust of Ron Swanson

On the show we deal in facts. Nothing says Certified Authority Beyond Reproach quite like this nicely detailed official bust of Ron Swanson from television’s Parks & Recreation. Purchased from official NBC Universal store.

9. Medieval Portrait of The Family Green

This painting is my all-time favorite work of Vlogbrothers fan art. It features John throwing our home fandom’s (a.k.a. Nerdfighteria, for the uninitiated) salute, alongside his wife, Sarah, known as "The Yeti" for her policy of on-camera avoidance, and their son, Henry, whose likeness is so adorably captured that it hits right in the feels with every glance. Painted by artist Brie Lee.

10. Captain Picard's Inferno

A great example of my reveling the role of Puppet Master. For those who've longed to see Ensign Wesley Crusher—or his alter ego, Sparks McGee—finally flip the script on Jean Luc, this endless Wet Wil-y is for you. The expression on Captain Picard’s face = perfection. Enjoy. (And you’re welcome, Wil Wheaton.)

11. Bow Tie Sculpture Guy

At first glance the bow tie, jacket and hairdo all suggest that it must be the Eleventh Doctor Who, Matt Smith. Wrong. Both the subject of this sculpture and the sculptor himself is none other than Mr. Raoul Meyer, a character ever so slightly less epic than Dr. Who. Meyer was John Green's high school history teacher and most recently the writer of both U.S. and World History courses for yet another show in the Vlogbrothers YouTube Empire, Crash Course. This very special piece is on loan. I’m only hoping to have the strength of character to see to its return as promised.

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fun
Can You Figure Out How Many Triangles Are in This Picture?

Time for another brain teaser. How many triangles do you see here? A Quora user posted the image above (which we spotted on MSN) for fellow brainiacs to chew on. See if you can figure it out. We’ll wait.

Ready?

So, as you can see, all the smaller triangles can combine to become bigger triangles, which is where the trick lies. If you count up every different triangle formed by the lines, you should get 24. (Don’t forget the big triangle!)

Some pedantic Quora users thought it through and realized there are even more triangles, if you really want to go there. There’s a triangle formed by the “A” in the signature in the right-hand corner, and if we’re counting the concept of triangles, the word “triangle” counts, too.

As math expert Martin Silvertant writes on Quora, “A triangle is a mathematical idea rather than something real; physical triangles are by definition not geometrically perfect, but approximations of triangles. In other words, both the pictorial triangles and the words referring to triangles are referents to the concept of a triangle.” So yes, you could technically count the word “triangle.”  (Silvertant also includes a useful graphic explaining how to find all the pictorial triangles.)

Check out the whole Quora discussion for in-depth explainers from users about their methods of figuring it out.

[h/t MSN]

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Food
This Couple Has Spent the Past 30 Years Visiting Every Cracker Barrel in the U.S.
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Ray and Wilma Yoder are probably America's foremost amateur experts on Cracker Barrel restaurants. As Eater reports, the Indiana couple is on a 30-year quest to eat at every single Cracker Barrel in the U.S. And they’ve almost completed it.

Ray Yoder of Goshen, Indiana, first started going to Cracker Barrel regularly when he worked delivering RVs across the country. Soon, Wilma was coming along, too, and the couple began hunting down Cracker Barrel locations in earnest, a pastime they’ve pursued for the past three decades.

Cracker Barrel got its start in Lebanon, Tennessee, in 1969, and according to Ray, visiting the restaurants while on the road felt like being at home. “It has a down-home spirit, and everybody is friendly,” he told the Lebanon Democrat. He told the paper that stopping at Cracker Barrels helped relieve boredom when he was on the road.

Ray and Wilma Yoder stand in front of two RVs outside a Cracker Barrel.
Now, he and Wilma are celebrities to those in the Cracker Barrel know. Cracker Barrel’s corporate leadership invites them to opening day at new stores. Employees know of them, and sometimes they receive gift baskets when they come in to cross a new Cracker Barrel off their list. People ask to take their picture when they visit.

The 80-year-olds have just two rules for their visits: At each location, they always buy something, even if it’s just a cup of coffee, and leave a tip. There’s no limit on how many Cracker Barrels they’ll go to in a single day, though. They once visited 10 different locations on a drive along the East Coast. Overall, their Cracker Barrel adventure has taken them more than 5 million miles across 44 states.

The Yoders recently visited their 644th Cracker Barrel, attending a ribbon-cutting ceremony for a new location in Lavonia, Georgia, in early July. They’re hoping to hit up the last Cracker Barrel on their list—until the next one opens, that is—by heading to Tualatin, Oregon, sometime later this year.

[h/t Eater]

All images courtesy Cracker Barrel

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