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21 Band Names Based on TV Shows

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Getty Images/Simpsons Wikia/Erin McCarthy

You know how you occasionally hear an awesome turn of phrase and immediately think, “That would make the best band name? These people did the same thing, but the difference between us and them is that they actually went on to name a band. Check out these 21 band names inspired by a little quality time flipping channels from the couch.

1. Evergreen Terrace

Alex Meagher, Flickr // CC BY NC-2.0

A metalcore band named after the street on which everyone’s favorite Springfieldian family lives. Homer, Marge, Bart, Lisa and Maggie live at 742 Evergreen Terrace.

2. Fall Out Boy

via Getty Images

The “Sugar We’re Goin’ Down” band is named after—yes—Fallout Boy, a minor character in The Simpsons. But it’s not because the guys in the band were such Matt Groening fans; they didn’t even get the reference when they adopted the name. The nameless band was in the middle of their second show when they decided to poll the audience for name ideas. A Simpsons fan shouted the name of Radioactive Man’s sidekick, and the band liked it.

3. I Voted For Kodos

Bridget Maniaci, Flickr // CC BY ND-2.0

OK, one last Simpsons reference. A now-defunct ska band named themselves after a quote in Treehouse of Horror VII. Aliens Kang and Kodos take over Earth and declare themselves the new presidential candidates. Kang wins and immediately enslaves the human race. Here's how that ends:

4. The Anti-Dentites

This Connecticut-based band pays tribute to the famous Bryan Cranston episode of Seinfeld.

5. Betty's Not a Vitamin

Named after one of the biggest marketing oversights in history, Paste magazine called these guys one of the best-named bands of all time

6. Eve’s Plum

Before she was Vitamin C (and Amber Von Tussle, for that matter), Colleen Fitzpatrick was in a band called Eve’s Plum, a tip of the hat to Ms. Jan Brady herself, Eve Plumb.

7. Marsha Brady

Mike McCall, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

Of course, Marcia’s always there to steal Jan’s spotlight—although this Cincinnati cover band either wasn’t interested in exact spelling or wanted to sidestep pesky copyright laws.

8. Johnny Bravo

But wait, there’s more Brady Bunch! Remember the episode where Greg moonlights as a teen idol named Johnny Bravo? So does this Ohio cover band.

9. The Banana Convention

Greg Brady sure had a lot of near-misses in the music industry. He also had a garage band called “The Banana Convention,” which sounded pretty good to this group from Saginaw, MI. They are, self-described, “a happy sounding Paramore meets No Doubt, with a splash of Weezer.”

10. Ned’s Atomic Dustbin

cormac70, Flickr // CC BY NC-ND-2.0

Here’s one for the Brits. An episode of The Goon Show, a British radio comedy show, is what inspired the name of Ned’s Atomic Dustbin. You may have heard their version of the Bay City Rollers’ “Saturday Night” in So I Married an Axe Murderer.

11. Does It Offend You, Yeah?

Sounds like a controversial statement, but the lead singer of the band says the name was actually just a quote from the ever-offensive David Brent on the British version of The Office:

Everybody thinks the name is some kind of statement but it's a quote from David Brent in an episode of The Office. When me and James [Rushent] first started writing music together we decided to put it up on MySpace. We needed a name to put as our profile name so just put what was the first thing that was said on TV, we switched it on and Ricky Gervais said 'Does it offend you, yeah? My drinking?' so we just went with that. No thought went into it whatsoever.

12. Chigliak Records

OK, technically this one isn’t a band, but still worth a mention. Justin Vernon of Bon Iver is such a fan of Northern Exposure that they honored the film buff character Ed Chigliak with a namesake record label. Vernon said,

Honestly, before I settled on a name for the Bon Iver project in general, Chigliak was in the running for what I was going to name the band, just because I love him so much. He’s my favorite in the pantheon of characters in the history of the world. So I was, like, "Well, that’s the best name for the label.’"He just represents the best of art. In the show, he’s penpals with Martin Scorsese, he’s a big film buff and he’s sort of a representation of what we’re trying to do at the label: like good music that may not be box office-smashing. We want to try to spread some of the music that maybe didn’t get out enough the first time around.

13. Eve 6

Joshua Smelser, Flickr // CC BY NC-ND-2.0

More sci-fi fans in the music business. The band’s name refers to an episode of The X-Files where genetically engineered woman are named “Eves” and genetically engineered men are called “Adams.” One of the Eves was named Eve 6, which drummer Tony Fagenson thought would make for a pretty cool band name.

14. Killswitch Engage

Andreh Santo, Flickr // CC BY ND-2.0

Eve 6 isn’t the only band inspired by Mulder and Scully. The metalcore band chose their name after watching an X-Files episode called “Kill Switch” written by cyberpunk novelist William Gibson. (He’s the guy who coined the term “cyberspace,” by the way.)

15. The Bloodhound Gang

Children of the ‘80s may remember that “The Bloodhound Gang” was the name of a skit on the PBS show 3-2-1 Contact. “They were a group of nerdy kids that solved crimes with math puzzles,” the band's guitarist, Lupus Thunder, explained in 2000. “It just made sense. We were a rap band so we needed to have a cool ‘tough’ sounding name, hence the ‘gang’. But deep down inside we're a bunch of nerds who should be doing math puzzles and playing Dungeons and Dragons or something similar. So the name just fits. Plus, the reference to the old ‘80s TV show shows what we're all about.”

16. Frodus

Nicole Kibert, Flickr // CC BY NC-ND-2.0

This "spazzcore band" took its name from last episode of The Monkees, “The Frodis Caper.” The Frodis, apparently, was a being from another planet that resembles a one-eyed philodendron with a football-shaped eye.

17. Ookla the Mok

Michael Pereckas, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

Who remembers Thundarr the Barbarian? It was a Saturday morning cartoon that ran in the early ‘80s, and while it may not have had a profound effect on most of us, it definitely influenced Ookla the Mok. Ookla the Mok was a Wookiee-like character who traveled the world with Thundarr, battling evil sorcerers. “But what do they sing?” you’re probably wondering. Here’s a little sample: “Tantric Yoda” was the #1 requested song on the Dr. Demento radio show in 2012. If you’ve ever wondered what it would be like to be seduced by Yoda, wonder no more

18. Das Racist

Dave Lichterman, Flickr // CC BY NC-ND-2.0

The irreverent rappers named themselves after a clip on a now-defunct show on MTV2 called Wonder Showzen. According to MC Himanshu Suri,

I think being minorities at a liberal arts college and that type of environment had an impact on both the way we view race and our sense of humor, which people often use as a tool to deal with race. I always felt like Wonder Showzen was a television show that captured that type of thing perfectly. When I saw the little kid yelling "THAT'S RACIST" it blew my mind. And then it became a game...to take all the seriousness out of making legitimate commentary on race, because that can get very annoying. So when something veering on racially insensitive would pop off in a commercial on television or something it would be like, who could yell "That's Racist" first. And then we thought it would be a cool name.

19. Minus the Bear

Nicole Kibert, Flickr // CC BY NC-ND-2.0

An indie band from Seattle, Minus the Bear was inspired by a sitcom from the ‘70s that featured a truck driver and his escapades with his pet chimp named Bear. Someone who was friends with the band had gone on a date, and when asked how the date went, he said, “You know 'You know that TV show from the 70s, B.J. and The Bear? It was like that, minus the bear.” And someone in the band probably said, “That would make an awesome band name,” and then it was so.

20. The Number 12 Looks Like You

Ervin, Flickr // CC BY ND-2.0

This grindcore/progressive metal/hardcore punk/jazz band was named after a Twilight Zone episode. In the episode, the members of a future (ahem, the year 2000, cue Conan) society undergo an operation at the age of 18 to become beautiful and can choose from just a handful of various models.

21. Crystal Castles

The Canadian duo took their name from She-Ra, although technically it was inspired by a commercial for a She-Ra toy. The ad was hawking She-Ra’s Crystal Castle and, the band says, said that “The Crystal Castle is the source of all power,” and “The fate of the world is safe in Crystal Castle.” I wonder if it was this one:

Who'd we leave out besides Toad the Wet Sprocket?

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8 Gonzo Facts About Hunter S. Thompson
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Hunter S. Thompson in Gonzo: The Life and Work of Hunter S. Thompson (2008)
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Like any real-life legend, there are many myths surrounding the life and work of Hunter S. Thompson. But in Thompson’s case, most of those stories—particularly the more outlandish ones—are absolutely true. The founder of the “Gonzo journalism” movement is one of the most fascinating figures of the 20th century. In celebration of what would have been his 80th birthday, here are some things you might not have known about the eccentric writer.

1. HE WAS NAMED AFTER A FAMOUS SCOTTISH SURGEON.

Hunter S. Thompson was reportedly named after one of his mother’s ancestors, a Scottish surgeon named Nigel John Hunter. But Hunter wasn't just your run-of-the-mill surgeon. In a 2004 interview with the Independent, Thompson brought along a copy of The Reluctant Surgeon, a Biography of Nigel John Hunter, a biography of his namesake, which read: "A gruff Scotsman, Hunter has been described as the most important naturalist between Aristotle and Darwin, the Shakespeare of medicine and the greatest man the British ever produced. He was the first to trace the lymphatic system. He performed the first human artificial insemination. He was the greatest collector of anatomical specimens in history. He prescribed the orthopaedic shoe that allowed Lord Byron to walk."

When pressed about what that description had to do with him, Thompson responded: "Well, I guess that might be the secret of my survival. Good genes."

2. HE MISSED HIS HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION … BECAUSE HE WAS IN JAIL.

Just a few weeks before he was set to graduate from high school, at the age of 17, Thompson was charged as an accessory to robbery and sentenced to 60 days in jail. 

“One night Ralston Steenrod, who was in the Athenaeum with Hunter, was driving, and Hunter and another guy he knew were in the car,” Thompson’s childhood friend Neville Blakemore recalled of the incident. “As they were driv­ing through Cherokee Park, the other guy said, ‘Stop. I want to bum a ciga­rette from that car.’ People used to go park and neck at this spot. And the guy got out and apparently went back and mugged them. The guy who was mugged got their license number and traced the car, and within a very short time they were all three arrested.

“Just before this Hunter had been blamed for a nighttime gas-station rob­bery,” Blakemore added, “and before that he and some friends got arrested for buying booze under­age at Abe's Liquor Store on Frankfort Avenue by the tracks. So Hunter had a record, and he was already on probation. He was given an ultimatum: jail or the military. And Hunter took the Air Force. He didn't graduate with his class.”

3. IT WAS A FELLOW JOURNALIST WHO COINED THE TERM “GONZO.”

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While covering the 1968 New Hampshire primary, Thompson met fellow writer and editor Bill Carodoso, editor of The Boston Globe Sunday Magazine, which is where Thompson first heard him use the word “Gonzo.” “It meant sort of ‘crazy’ or ‘off-the-wall,’” Thompson said in Anita Thompson’s Ancient Gonzo Wisdom: Interviews with Hunter S. Thompson. Two years later, in June 1970, Thompson wrote an article for Scanlan’s Monthly entitled “The Kentucky Derby Is Decadent and Depraved,” which became a game-changing moment in journalism because of its offbeat, slightly manic style that was written with first-person subjectivity.

Among the many fellow journalists who praised Thompson for the piece was Cardoso, who sent a letter to Thompson that “said something like, ‘Forget all the sh*t you’ve been writing, this is it; this is pure Gonzo.’ Gonzo. Yeah, of course. That’s what I was doing all the time. Of course, I might be crazy.” Thompson ran with the word, and would use it himself for the first time a year later, in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas.

4. HE TYPED OUT FAMOUS NOVELS TO LEARN THE ART OF WRITING.

In order to get the “feel” of being a writer, Thompson used to retype his favorite novels in full. “[H]is true model and hero was F. Scott Fitzgerald,” Louis Menand wrote in The New Yorker. “He used to type out pages from The Great Gatsby, just to get the feeling, he said, of what it was like to write that way, and Fitzgerald’s novel was continually on his mind while he was working on Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, which was published, after a prolonged and agonizing compositional nightmare, in 1972.”

"If you type out somebody's work, you learn a lot about it,” Thompson told Charlie Rose in 1997. “Amazingly it's like music. And from typing out parts of Faulkner, Hemingway, Fitzgerald—these were writers that were very big in my life and the lives of the people around me—so yeah, I wanted to learn from the best I guess."

5. HE RAN FOR SHERIFF IN COLORADO.

In 1970, Thompson ran for sheriff of Pitkin County, Colorado on what he called the Freak Power ticket. Among his political tactics: shaving his head so that he could refer to his opponent as his “long-haired opponent,” promising to eat mescaline while on duty, and campaigning to rename Aspen “Fat City” to deter "greed heads, land-rapers, and other human jackals from capitalizing on the name 'Aspen.'" Unfortunately, he lost.

6. HE STOLE A MEMENTO FROM ERNEST HEMINGWAY.

In 1964, three years after Ernest Hemingway committed suicide at his cabin in Ketchum, Idaho, Thompson traveled to the late author’s home in order to write “What Lured Hemingway to Ketchum?” While there, according to his widow, Hunter “got caught up in the moment” and took “a big pair of elk horns over the front door.” Last year, more than a decade after Thompson’s death, Anita returned the antlers to the Hemingway family—which is something she and Hunter had always planned to do. “They were warm and kind of tickled … they were so open and grateful, there was no weirdness,” Anita said.

7. HE ONCE USED THE INSIDE OF MUSICIAN JOHN OATES’ COLORADO CABIN AS HIS PERSONAL PARKING SPACE.

Magnolia Pictures

Earlier this month, musician John Oates—the latter half of Hall & Oates—shared a story about his ranch in Woody Creek, Colorado, just outside of Aspen, which is currently on the market for $6 million. In an interview with Colorado Public Radio, Oates recalled how when he first purchased the cabin, there was a red convertible parked inside. “I happened to ask the real estate agent who owned the convertible, and he said ‘your neighbor Hunter Thompson,’” Oates said. “Why is he keeping his car in a piece of property he doesn’t own? The real estate agent looked at me and said ‘It’s Woody Creek, you’ll figure this out. It’s a different kind of place.’” After sending several letters to his neighbor to retrieve his vehicle, Oates took matters into his own hands and deposited the car on Thompson’s lawn. Oates said that the two became friends, but never mentioned the incident.

8. AT HIS FUNERAL, HIS ASHES WERE SHOT OUT OF A CANNON.

On February 20, 2005—at the age of 67—Thompson committed suicide. But Thompson wasn’t about to leave this world quietly. In August of that year, in accordance with his wishes, Thompson's ashes were shot into the air from a cannon while fireworks filled the sky.

“He loved explosions," his widow, Anita, told ESPN, which wrote that, “The private celebration included actors Bill Murray and Johnny Depp, rock bands, blowup dolls and plenty of liquor to honor Thompson, who killed himself six months ago at the age of 67.”

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15 Memorable Quotes from George A. Romero
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Hollywood has lost one of its most iconic horror innovators with the death of George A. Romero, who passed away on Sunday at the age of 77. “He died peacefully in his sleep, following a brief but aggressive battle with lung cancer, and leaves behind a loving family, many friends, and a filmmaking legacy that has endured, and will continue to endure, the test of time,” his manager, Chris Roe, said in a statement.

Though he rose to prominence as the master of zombie flicks, beginning with Night of the Living Dead, Romero honed his filmmaking skills on a far less frightening set: shooting bits for Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood.

“I still joke that 'Mr. Rogers Gets a Tonsillectomy' is the scariest film I’ve ever made,” Romero once said. “What I really mean is that I was scared sh*tless while I was trying to pull it off.” (Rogers returned the favor by being a longtime champion of Romero’s work—and even called Dawn of the Dead “a lot of fun.”)

It’s that high-spirited sense of fun that made Romero’s work so iconic—and kept the New York City native busy for nearly 50 years. To celebrate his life and career, here are 15 of his most memorable quotes on everything from the humanity of zombies to the horror of Hollywood producers.

ON THE IMPORTANCE OF HAVING A SENSE OF HUMOR

“For a Catholic kid in parochial school, the only way to survive the beatings—by classmates, not the nuns—was to be the funny guy.”

ON THE HOLLYWOOD WAY

“If I fail, the film industry writes me off as another statistic. If I succeed, they pay me a million bucks to fly out to Hollywood and fart.”

ON BEING PIGEONHOLED

“As a filmmaker you get typecast just as much as an actor does, so I'm trapped in a genre that I love, but I'm trapped in it!”

ON ZOMBIES AS A METAPHOR

“I also have always liked the monster within idea. I like the zombies being us. Zombies are the blue-collar monsters.”

ON FINDING OBJECTIVITY AS A FILMMAKER

“There are so many factors when you think of your own films. You think of the people you worked on it with, and somehow forget the movie. You can't forgive the movie for a long time. It takes a few years to look at it with any objectivity and forgive its flaws.”

ON THE REAL VALUE OF THE INTERNET

“What the Internet's value is that you have access to information but you also have access to every lunatic that's out there that wants to throw up a blog.”

ON THE HORROR OF DEALING WITH PRODUCERS

“I'll never get sick of zombies. I just get sick of producers.”

ON THE IMPORTANCE OF COLLABORATION

“Collaborate, don’t dictate.”

ON THE BEAUTY OF LOW-BUDGET MOVIEMAKING

“I don't think you need to spend $40 million to be creepy. The best horror films are the ones that are much less endowed.”

ON HUMANS BEING THE REAL VILLAINS

“My zombies will never take over the world because I need the humans. The humans are the ones I dislike the most, and they're where the trouble really lies.”

ON BEING IMMUNE TO TRENDS

“Somehow I've been able to keep standing and stay in my little corner and do my little stuff and I'm not particularly affected by trends or I'm not dying to make a 3-D movie or anything like that. I'm just sort of happy to still be around.”

ON THE HUMANITY OF HORROR

“My stories are about humans and how they react, or fail to react, or react stupidly. I'm pointing the finger at us, not at the zombies. I try to respect and sympathize with the zombies as much as possible.”

ON THE ENDURING APPEAL OF HORROR

“If one horror film hits, everyone says, 'Let's go make a horror film.' It's the genre that never dies.”

ON THE IMPORTANCE OF SURROUNDING ZOMBIES WITH STUPID PEOPLE

“A zombie film is not fun without a bunch of stupid people running around and observing how they fail to handle the situation.”

ON LIFE AFTER DEATH

“I'm like my zombies. I won't stay dead!”

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